Long-term Immersion in the DMT Realm Through Controlled Intravenous Injection

Collective Vision, by Alex Grey

In recent decades usage of the psychedelic substance N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) has grown considerably, and its intriguing effects have even been the subject of a study by Dr. Rick Strassman. In his book DMT: The Spirit Molecule, Strassman recounted many of the strange 'entity encounters' experienced by participants in his scientific trial, but noted that it was difficult for the experiences to be studied in depth due to the speed of the 'trip' (sometimes described as being 'shot out of a cannon' into a parallel universe before being quickly pulled back into reality).

Strassman's interest in the topic has not waned over the years, and in a new paper - co-authored with Andrew Gallimore - he has suggested a new method of delivering DMT that might sustain the experience for a longer period - effectively immersing study participants in the DMT realm, in much the same way that the application of general anaesthesia keeps medical patients immersed in unconsciousness.

"[DMT] users consistently report the complete replacement of normal subjective experience with a novel 'alternate universe,' often densely populated with a variety of strange objects and other highly complex visual content, including what appear to be sentient 'beings'," Strassman and Gallimore note. "The phenomenology of the DMT state is of great interest to psychology and calls for rigorous academic enquiry":

The extremely short duration of DMT effects—less than 20 minutes—militates against single dose administration as the ideal model for such enquiry. Using pharmacokinetic modelling and DMT blood sampling data, we demonstrate that the unique pharmacological characteristics of DMT, which also include a rapid onset and lack of acute tolerance to its subjective effects, make it amenable to administration by target-controlled intravenous infusion. This is a technology developed to maintain a stable brain concentration of anaesthetic drugs during surgery. Simulations of our model demonstrate that this approach will allow research subjects to be induced into a stable and prolonged DMT experience, making it possible to carefully observe its psychological contents, and provide more extensive accounts for subsequent analyses.

Link: "A Model for the Application of Target-Controlled Intravenous Infusion for a Prolonged Immersive DMT Psychedelic Experience

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News Briefs 05-07-2016

Juno insertion? Sounds like the worst movie prequel ever...

Quote of the Day:

From out there on the Moon, international politics look so petty. You want to grab a politician by the scruff of the neck and drag him a quarter of a million miles out and say, ‘Look at that, you son of a bitch.’

Edgar Mitchell (Apollo 14 astronaut)

The Power of Ritual

The Power of Ritual

The following is a modified excerpt of the Preface to The Power of Ritual, by Robbie Davis-Floyd and Charles Laughlin. The Power of Ritual is available now from both Amazon US and Amazon UK.

Preface to The Power of Ritual

by Robbie Davis-Floyd

The Power of Ritual has grown out of my thirty years of research on ritual and technology in American childbirth, and in particular, out of a workshop I have often presented on “The Power of Ritual” to diverse groups around the country. Audiences for this workshop have included priests, psychotherapists, physicists, female professionals, social scientists, health care practitioners (nurses, midwives, physicians, childbirth educators), men’s movement participants and workshop leaders, business managers, New Agers, university students, drug and alcohol addicts, members (or former members) of cults, and aerospace engineers. During the course of these workshops, I have often noted a high level of confusion among people who are designing and performing rituals on a regular basis as a part of, for example, religious or spiritual retreats, psychotherapy intensives, men’s movement weekends-in-the-woods (popular in recent past decades), and self-help seminars. They tell me that they “intuit” what ritual is all about, but their sense of it is vague, unformed. They come to my workshops to find out what they themselves are actually up to! I am always delighted when such people show up in my audiences, as one of the major reasons why I started teaching these workshops was my concern about the uncritical use of ritual that has characterized the explosion of interest in the new spirituality, alternative healing, and self-help movements, to name only a few. Ritual is an extraordinarily powerful socializing tool that can be just as easily manipulated for ill as used for good. The naiveté of many contemporary ritual practitioners has worried me for a long time, and these workshops—and now this book—serve as my way of combating that naiveté. I often receive letters of thanks from such practitioners for “raising their consciousness” about precisely how ritual works, about its very real benefits, and about its equally real dangers. This information enables them to be more conscious and more responsible about the way they use the rituals they create.

My interest in ritual developed both from personal experience and from my anthropological studies of American childbirth, midwifery, and obstetrics. My childhood in Casper, Wyoming was punctuated with ritual events, many of which focused around the local rodeos that happened during the summers, and the seasonal celebrations of Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. But my deepest ritual imprinting came from growing up in the Presbyterian Church. Although I moved away from that religion in later years, the hymns we sang in church every Sunday, the vivid memory of the light streaming through the stained glass window showing Jesus’ ascension, the feeling of peace and completion that would descend over me as the minister raised his arms to give the final blessing—all these still resonate in my being and provide me with a sense of stability. In particular the words of the Doxology, which I must have sung at least 500 times during my childhood churchgoing years, still give me the goose bumps I used to get as I rose as one with the whole congregation, to sing joyously:

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost
As it was in the beginning, it is now and ever shall be
World without end, Amen, Amen

As I typed those words just now, singing as my fingers moved over the computer keys, that same uplifting feeling surged inside of me, goose bumps popped out on my arms once again, and I was right back in memory inside that beautiful church staring at the light shining through that stained glass window. Such is the power of ritual to affect our emotions, even decades after the fact.

But now as I reread the words of the Doxology, my critical faculties come into play: that song, which purports to be so timeless and so universal, does not encompass certain facts that I accept as reality. Things are not as they were in the beginning—in fact, change is the one constant of both human and universal experience. Our world is not “without end” —one day, billions of years from now, the Earth will be swallowed up in flames when its sun turns into a red giant. And there are no females and no “female principle” in that song, only a father, a son, and an androgynous spirit which is the closest the Presbyterianism of my youth could get to acknowledging that males are not the only gender. So I can’t even find myself in its words—they do not charter my existence, like a good myth should. As an experiment, I sing the song once more and note that in spite of my intellectual objections, the goosebumps and uplifting sensation return. As we shall see throughout this book, rituals primarily affect our emotions—through triggering a powerful emotional response, ritual can get people to believe or at least resonate deeply with ideologies that they might intellectually reject.

In my early years as an anthropology student during the 1970s, I studied shamanism and ritual healing in Mexico, and worked for a time with two Mexican shamans, one traditional and one thoroughly cosmopolitan. Those experiences, which involved both anthropological observation and personal participation in rituals of various sorts, taught me a great deal about ritual’s flexibility as I saw it stretch to encompass the contrasting realities of the pre- and postmodern worlds. I watched with amazement as the people participating in the rituals that the traditional shaman had been performing for decades suddenly began to include American New Agers seeking connection with the earth and with traditional cultures—in Don Lucio, the traditional shaman I worked with, I guess these seekers found at least a facsimile of Castaneda’s Don Juan. And I was equally fascinated by the postmodern shaman, Edgardo Vasquez Gomez. A wealthy upper class Mexican gentleman, he had studied traditional shamanic techniques all over Mexico, and was eclectically combining them with a European esoteric spiritual system based on the works of Gurdjieff, which invited individuals to “wake up” to a greater awareness of everyday life. His use of ritual to stimulate this kind of awareness in his followers was masterful; watching him manipulate people’s states of consciousness was a lesson to me in the intentional use of ritual to achieve instrumental (practical) ends. (Both Don Lucio and Edgardo are now deceased.)

Perhaps my deepest engagements with ritual came during my participation, in later years, with a New Age healing group that evolved, over time, into a cult. I got involved in part because I wanted to do an anthropological study of that group. I watched and participated and took notes as their at-first tenuous belief system crystallized into an intensely tight and cohesive worldview. For the first two years, I didn’t believe a word of it—it was just a story, albeit a fascinating one, and my anthropological detachment remained intact. But the ritual process, as we will demonstrate in this book, can be overwhelming. Embarrassing as it is to admit, against my will I eventually got fully converted to that worldview. The moment of conversion was a devastating experience (described ... Read More »

News Briefs 04-07-2016

Go commando? Boxers? Nah, I wear briefs. OH! I still got it!

Thanks to Hayley Stevens, Rich Reynolds, and viewers like you.

"The fool who persists in his folly will become wise."
- William Blake

Jupiter Crowned By Giant Auroras

NASA Jupiter Hubble aurora

UPDATE: SUCCESS!

Named after the king of the gods, Jupiter is living up to its name. NASA's Hubble space telescope has captured images showing the planet crowned by auroras. Using Hubble's ultraviolet capabilities, the space agency's science boffins were able to film the auroras and snap some very pretty pics.

It's exciting times for our big neighbour, with NASA's Juno spacecraft set to orbit around Jupiter tonight, after a five year voyage. The main event will be a 35-minute engine burn at 11:18pm EDT. You can watch the mission live via NASA TV.

Juno Jupiter NASA spacecraft awesome

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News Briefs 01-07-2016

Weekend groove: Buffalo Daughter, Oui Oui.

Quote of the Day:

If voting made any difference they wouldn't let us do it.

~ Mark Twain

News Briefs 30-06-2016

I'll be brief. Hehe, get it? Brief? 'Cause they're news briefs. Get me, I'm a reg'lar comedian here!

Thanks to viewers like you.

"Every day's a gift. It's just... does it have to be a pair of socks?"
- Tony Soprano

Quantum Mind: Can Experienced Meditators Influence the Movement of Atomic Particles?

Quantum Mind

One of the key mysteries in the realm of quantum physics is the role of the observer, or more precisely, consciousness. As Nobel laureate Eugene Wigner once explained, when this relatively new branch of physics came into being, it was found that "it was not possible to formulate the laws of quantum mechanics in a fully consistent way without reference to the consciousness."

Very few physicists, however, give this mystery much thought (at least publicly). Bruce Rosenbaum and Fred Kuttner, in their book The Quantum Enigma, note that many of their colleagues "are under the impression that it has been resolved by one or another of the 'interpretations' of quantum theory." Even though, they point out, "most developers of those interpretations...still see a mystery."

In a recent talk at the 'Science of Consciousness' conference in Tucson, Arizona, parapsychologist Dean Radin noted that when it comes to the (quantum physics) 'measurement problem', "everyone offers theories about consciousness, but nobody does anything about it." So Radin and his team decided to see if they could find experimental evidence of consciousness influencing quantum effects.

Radin's project was a fairly simple, though left-field, extension of the well-known double-slit experiment:

The only new element in this experiment, is that we asked people - in this case, a meditator - to keep the double-slit in mind, and to imagine in their minds eye, that they could see which of the two slits the photon went through. This is, as far as we could tell, the only way of directly testing whether consciousness is collapsing the wave function.

In the experiment, 137 test subjects - consisting of both experienced meditators and non-meditators - took part in sessions lasting 20 minutes each, made up of alternating sets of 30 seconds of observation with roughly 30 seconds of rest (the 'roughly' was intentional, to avoid any artifacts on strict 30 second cycles of repetition). And, after analysing the data from this pilot study of 250 sessions with 137 people - Radin and his team found a significant effect size...and especially so with the meditators in the group.

Encouraged by these results, the researchers ran a number of further experiments, including an internet-based version which ran for 3 years, with over 5000 sessions completed by human subjects, and over 7000 done by a 'Linux' robot as a control. Again, they found a substantial effect.

No independent replications have yet been carried out to their conclusion, although Radin did note in his talk that shortly before his presentation he had been contacted by a physicist at the University of Sao Paulo who is currently carrying out an independent replication, who explained that the results so far have led to "an intense mixture of feelings... I'm oscillating between OH MY GOD and wait, something must be wrong."

For those interested in listening to Dean Radin's complete talk on these 'quantum consciousness' experiments, I've embedded it below.

For another look at the 2016 'Science of Consciousness' conference, take a read of this four-part article by attendee (and speaker), science journalist John Horgan. Note: Horgan comes at nearly all topics from a skeptical viewpoint, including skepticism itelf (his critique of organised skepticism recently got plenty of attention), so much of the article feels rather negative in tone - and his mention of Dean Radin's presentation is no different. Unfairly so, in my opinion: making statements such as "[Radin] is like a caricature of an old-fashioned scientist, an image no doubt cultivated to boost his credibility" is an accusation that I find difficult to square with my own interactions with Dean, and a rather crude way to write off what is, I think, an interesting presentation of some fascinating research.

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News Briefs 29-06-2016

*Pops head out of reality tunnel*
*Ducks back in*

Thanks to @catvincent

Quote of the Day:

Intelligence is the capacity to receive, decode and transmit information efficiently. Stupidity is blockage of this process at any point. Bigotry, ideologies etc. block the ability to receive; robotic reality-tunnels block the ability to decode or integrate new signals; censorship blocks transmission.

Robert Anton Wilson

News Briefs 28-06-2016

Dogpocalypse now...

Quote of the Day:

Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.

George Carlin