News, news and more news. We don't just fill your Xmas stocking, we're here for the duration.

News Briefs 07-09-2004

Today's menu includes plenty of space and a hot serving of french flies. No, that's not a typo...

  • Forget flying cars...just get some wings and a pair of jet engines, and fly like this French rocketeer. Some video of this flight would rock.
  • Fact-checking Dan Brown's research. No, not the Davinci book - space.com takes a look at his astrobiology novel Deception Point (Amazon US only).
  • More background on the controversial SETI signal. And just to fill in the empty corners of your brain, revisit the original Wow signal from around thirty years ago.
  • The question is: is there anybody out there? I prefer to be comfortably numb.
  • Linda Moulton Howe finds high strangeness in soil and plants at an Ohio crop formation.
  • Mysterious cattle mutilations - do they still happen? Apparently so. I wouldn't be a cow for quids.
  • Explanation of an alleged UFO video.
  • Conversely, what about the failure of UFO skepticism.
  • It may be required, when we start talking about photographs of orbs.
  • Struggling farmers note - forget the crops and cattle and just build yourself a UFO watchtower.
  • Mystery sky sausages were probably just a school project.
  • NASA's Starship 2040 may be coming to your town soon.
  • Speaking of, instellar travel is just an antimatter of time.
  • Get a grip on the distances involved in space travel with this website.
  • Genesis 'sun-catcher' spacecraft on schedule for a Wednesday re-entry.
  • Space News celebrates its 15th anniversary by compiling a Top 10 of the most influential people in space over the last decade and a half.
  • A replica of the Kon-Tiki is set to sail and study the Pacific in 2005.
  • New study finds that European gypsies came out of India around 1000 years ago.
  • If that sounds like big news, what about the first Americans coming from Australia? I claim dominion on behalf of my country.
  • French 'amateur' archaeologists defend their secret chamber theory. With requisite Hawass hyperbole. I'd say the smart money would be on an exclusive National Geographic 'discovery' in about 2006.
  • Gordon Rugg, the apparent cracker of the Voynich Manuscript, is the scientific method man.
  • How did hundreds of bronze coins end up at the bottom of the Dead Sea?
  • King Solomon persists at Armageddon dig site.
  • Honolulu businessman's bid to search for Noah's Ark foiled by Turkish authorities.
  • Phaistos disk is a menu? Probably doubled as a lazy susan as well.
  • More British ghost-busters wise up and go to the local hotel to check for ghosts. A good rort that one.
  • Miracles draw crowds to the Lady of Beshwat.
  • Humans and parrots may share sharp tongues.
  • Hair analysis could reveal your recent travels. Expect a wave of bald terrorists.
  • The deep sea visionary who opened the world's eyes to the strange world beneath the water.
  • Images of hurricanes from space look impressive, but at least we don't live on Saturn.
  • Historians plead case for Tacoma's 'little Stonehenge'.
  • North Korea 'bred spies using former US soldiers'.
  • Ireland's first floating church explodes, then sinks. Bishop heard yelling "Ah, to the shore, to the shore".
  • 1st Space Elevator competition set for mid-2005. Let's hope it fares better than the floating Irish church.

Thanks Pam and Bill.



Quote of the Day:



Truth and technology will triumph over bullshit and bureaucracy

Rene Anselmo

News Briefs 06-09-2004

People ask me if aliens exist, how come they haven't said hello to us yet? I point to examples like the tragedy in Beslin, Russia, and man's ability to slaughter several hundred children just to make a political point. I wouldn't want to visit this planet either, people make me sick.

Quote of the Day:



The majority of people dismiss those things that lie beyond the bounds of their own understanding as absurd and not worth thinking about.

from the novel The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami

News Briefs 03-09-2004

Friday at last with a long weekend (American Labor Day) at hand. Life is good.

  • Our human ancestors quickly found their feet.
  • Response to our most ancient instinct is hardwired into the human brain and there’s nothing we can do about it.
  • Contrary to popular belief, Northern European men living during the early Middle Ages were nearly as tall as their modern-day American descendants.
  • 160-million years ago Nessie's mamma, an Ichthyosaurs, a fish-like reptile with big teeth, swam happily in what is now the Arctic ocean.
  • A student went on a Mexican adventure, an anthropological dig over the summer. Learn what he learned.
  • Hungry? Here's the recipe for tamales, food of early Incan and Mayan cultures, found in records as early as 5000, possibly even 7000, BC. Make an extra dozen for me, okay?
  • Zahi Hawass, the director of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, has found a hidden tomb between the Sphinx and the pyramid of Khafre. Interesting location.
  • Alaska's Totem Poles, a new guide, brings the truth of the emblem of Alaska to light. Alaska's Totem Poles is available from Amazon US and UK.
  • The Stonehenge tunnel faces a tough road ahead. Cernig will be delighted.
  • Stonehenge in Russia?
  • Italian scientists use 3-D scan to reconstruct the face of a mummy.
  • Japanese scientists have discovered the remains of the world’s largest lava flow, more than 11,000 feet (3,400 meters) below sea level off the coast of Peru.
  • If you're in London you don't want to miss one of the world's most bizarre scientific collections from the storerooms of London's Science Museum. How can you go wrong with drills made to let the demons out of people's heads and poisonous aphrodisiacs? The man who found the world's oldest condoms needs to donate them here.
  • Every fifth man has women's brains. The great punch lines to this are innumerable.
  • Chinese and American scientists have discovered a huge glacier spread over a 20 sq km in the Himalayas. We thought it was all melting.
  • Pig transplants may be safer than thought.
  • Attention Jameske. Cats can spread deadly bird flu.
  • Lord of The Rings director Peter Jackson will revive the 1933 classic, King Kong.
  • Don't get mad - get even. A pleasure center in your brain appreciates the sweetness of revenge.
  • The Olympics came to a close and everyone parted as friends. BTW, Greece still wants those statues back.
  • Home Depot and the Storm God conspire to hit Florida with the second category-four hurricane of the season. Trailer parks are scheduled to receive no mercy. Would you like to track it?
  • Mysterious fires still threaten Kuku Kakaya.
  • As India prepares to fast-track GM crops to feed its growing population, Thailand retreats from field trials after a public outcry. Now the debate over GMOs (genetically modified organisms) spreads to Asia.
  • As the age of oil wanes, what will take its place? A little bit of everything awaits us in the hybrid future. A hybrid electrical grid could accommodate every available power source.
  • Get ready for the mass-produced, meltdown-proof future of nuclear energy.
  • Cold fusion may be staging a comeback.
  • The Mahabharata tells of ancient nuclear blasts and levitating stones of Shivapur. But what did they know? ;o)
  • Jon Downes tracks King Arthur at Phenomena.
  • Animal mutilations are accompanied by loud, unidentified aerial sound.
  • Flying Triangle sightings on the rise.
  • Bigfoot may be visiting the beaches of the Lone Star state.
  • Virtual humans are proposed as space travelers.
  • Scientists begin mapping the known universe. That will probably take a while. Mapping the unknown part will take longer.
  • The NASA Hubble Space Telescope captures the explosion of a massive star blazing with the light of 200-million Suns in a spectacular supernova.
  • NASA's Cassini reveals Saturn's cool rings.

Thanks Kat. Take care, Rich.

Quote of the Day:

People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

George Orwell

News Briefs 1-09-2004

So, the War on Terror cannot be won? Depends on the purpose of it in the first place. If it was to increase domestic government powers, increase taxes and reduce civil liberties then it has been an unqualified success.

  • War on terror cannot be won.
  • Curious circle: Retiree seeks explanation for mysterious ring
  • Sceptic spots UFO.
  • Why an orgasm really is all in the mind.
  • Humans march to a faster genetic drummer than other primates.
  • Scan as damaging as atomic bomb.
  • Brain may produce its own antipsychotic drug.
  • The flying triangle enigma.
  • Sitting in front of a screen for hours can do irreparable harm to a child's eyesight.
  • Questions in Qumran.
  • Jedi Academy opens in Romania.
  • Toothpaste, water and sunshine equals energy for the future.
  • A catalogue of false terror warnings.
  • Enron boss pleads guilty to conspiracy. So who else did he implicate to make it a conspiracy?
  • Adam and his eves. There's nothing so certain than the story born of unjustified axioms.
  • Fred Whipple passes on at 97.
  • Egyptian mummy unwrapped by scanning.
  • Portable atomic clock is the size of a grain of rice.
  • Life on Mars: a definite possiblility.
  • Planet madness continues with two new discoveries.
  • Neolithic homes unearthed at roadside.
  • Ancient Pasargadae threatened by construction of dam.
  • A sleeping giant lies under Afghan sands.

Quote of the Day:

When war is declared, truth is the first casualty.

Arthur Ponsonby

News Briefs 1-09-2004

So, the War on Terror cannot be won? Depends on the purpose of it in the first place. If it was to increase domestic government powers, increase taxes and reduce civil liberties then it has been an unqualified success.

  • War on terror cannot be won.
  • Curious circle: Retiree seeks explanation for mysterious ring
  • Sceptic spots UFO.
  • Why an orgasm really is all in the mind.
  • Humans march to a faster genetic drummer than other primates.
  • Scan as damaging as atomic bomb.
  • Brain may produce its own antipsychotic drug.
  • The flying triangle enigma.
  • Sitting in front of a screen for hours can do irreparable harm to a child's eyesight.
  • Questions in Qumran.
  • Jedi Academy opens in Romania.
  • Toothpaste, water and sunshine equals energy for the future.
  • A catalogue of false terror warnings.
  • Enron boss pleads guilty to conspiracy. So who else did he implicate to make it a conspiracy?
  • Adam and his eves. There's nothing so certain than the story born of unjustified axioms.
  • Fred Whipple passes on at 97.
  • Egyptian mummy unwrapped by scanning.
  • Portable atomic clock is the size of a grain of rice.
  • Life on Mars: a definite possiblility.
  • Planet madness continues with two new discoveries.
  • Neolithic homes unearthed at roadside.
  • Ancient Pasargadae threatened by construction of dam.
  • A sleeping giant lies under Afghan sands.

Quote of the Day:

When war is declared, truth is the first casualty.

Arthur Ponsonby

News Briefs 31-08-2004

The seasons are changing, but the news keeps rolling in. Make sure your cuppa is a big one, there's plenty to read about today...

  • Amateur archaeologists track lost tomb of Cheops inside Great Pyramid.
  • A wooden carving of the bisexual Viking god Odin was part of Seahenge.
  • Unearthing the Bible: the hunt for treasure and truth grows ever wilder.
  • Technology unravels new views of mummies.
  • Sudan's ancient treasures reveal the mighty culture that humbled Egypt's pharaohs.
  • Analysing the firestorm that has erupted over the Qumran community.
  • 'Lucy' may be going on show, after all these years.
  • Catch a ray of falling sunshine - NASA's daring "catch" of the Genesis spacecraft bearing solar samples is coming soon. No doubt you'll see this one on the television news (success or failure, it's all good TV). More at space.com.
  • Life on Mars a definite possibility.
  • Geobiologists create novel method for studying ancient life forms.
  • ESA space technology may yield house designs that can withstand earthquakes, hurricanes, fires, flooding.
  • Expedition to seek 50-million-year record of Earth's climate in underwater mountain chain.
  • Brain scans reveal that revenge is sweet.
  • Forget planes and skyscrapers - protect the cows and chickens from Al Qaeda!
  • To learn about the Earth at the time of life's origin, just look for footprints on the Moon.
  • Shock and awe - author Linda Simon chronicles history of electric inventions in Dark Light (Amazon US and UK).
  • Lining up charged particles called free radicals, British scientists have developed the first practical plastic magnet. That's going to cut the weight of my fridge in half.
  • Could a single dark matter particle be light-years wide?
  • Quark study breaks logjam between theory and experiment.
  • Plumbing the nature of nature comes natural at the University of California, as leeches, moss, microbes, and worms make the cut for genome sequencing.
  • Scientists may use drugs to stop addiction.
  • Viagra helps climbers deal with high altitudes. I'm biting my tongue on this one, the punchline possibilities are endless...
  • Study finds that children from tidy homes grow up more intelligent. I better stop neglecting my kids and wash the dishes.
  • Carrie-Anne Moss bullet times her way from the Matrix trilogy into a new thriller about remote viewing.
  • Farmer baffled by Wisconsin crop circle.
  • A circle with a difference: this one has been evolving for three years.
  • Manager of Dryden Airport wants to get to the bottom of recent UFO sightings in the area.
  • New Zealand man plans expedition to find Noah's Ark. Maybe he should concentrate on the One Ring.
  • Scorpion Queen eyes record, despite being stung twice (you'd have to expect that, living with 6000 scorpions).
  • Is there something to the Mothman death list, as more tragic deaths are added?
  • New Age magazines are ready to enlighten you.
  • Fiction is stranger than truth, at least when you talk about the Bear Lake monster and the Kelly Green Men.
  • Meet the man who studies alien abductees and ritual abuse victims.
  • Computer maker in an alien world.
  • The latest rant from Randi. Speaking of which, where have all the skeptical websites gone? Skepticweb is blank (perhaps hacked), Dangerous Ideas has definitely been hacked, and the Hall of Ma'at has disappeared (hacked as well?). Fill us in if you know the answer.
  • Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, pioneer thanatologist and NDE spokesperson, has passed away. Bon voyage!

Thanks Kat, Vincent and Rico.



Quote of the Day:



I've told my children that when I die, to release balloons in the sky to celebrate that I graduated. For me, death is a graduation.

Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

News Briefs 30-08-2004

If news was slow last week, it went away for a holiday over the weekend. So today's news is a mix of this and that and everything in between.

  • Some guy named Greg Taylor has new articles posted on Graham Hancock's website. Remember the name, one day he's going to be famous.
  • Michael Hayes has a new book, High Priests, Quantum Genes. He's discussing his work over at Graham Hancock's Mysteries Forum as the Author of the Month. Subscriber response has been disappointing so I highly recommend everyone give his books a read and plague him with questions.
  • The discovery of a 1300-year-old handwritten copy of the Qur'an has been made public.
  • NASA plans rescue shuttles. Thunderbirds are go!
  • Innovative technology may help clean up pollution.
  • Only in Australia: bananas will generate electricity for homes of the future. In related news, monkeys in Australian zoos protest the confiscation of their bananas. Being a Queenslander, Greg Taylor rejoices and throws out his old solar panels.
  • North Korea has an environmental crisis.
  • This could be linked to the Asian continent's water crisis. This is the perfect example why a big population isn't necessarily better.
  • Do you enjoy telling people off? According to a study, many people do. Now get back to work, you lazy good-for-nothing TDG readers!
  • A US White House report says people are the cause of global warming. Duh. People are the cause of all the world's problems.
  • El Nino won't go away, according to U.N. agency.
  • A mystery beast in Texas ate 35 chickens in one day.
  • The remains of 3000-year-old Pacific Islanders had their skulls removed and replaced with shell bracelets.
  • Artifacts found in Nicaragua could shake up Central American history. Aye carumba.
  • A deceased man's family find a solid gold Viking arm ring in his attic. In related news, grandparents across the UK have their attics raided by gold-hungry relatives.
  • Flying cars are still decades away. I'm so disappointed, when I was a kid 20 years ago I thought we'd all be driving hover cars and wearing tight-fitting silver suits by the year 2004.
  • Psychologists in Stockholm think that if your boss is a charming, well-educated and polished leader intent on climbing the career ladder, then he/she could be a psychopath.
  • A friendly killer whale is damaging boats. This headline should read: Idiots in boats are damaging killer whale.
  • Dinosaur kangaroos are spotted in Chile. Perhaps eyewitnesses were hallucinating after eating kangaroo chili hotpot that was out-of-date and older than the dinosaurs?
  • Queen Victoria's underwear secret. Hrmm, I wonder if the founder of Victoria's Secret lingerie knew about this?
  • A Kentucky Presbytarian studies paranormal phenomena.
  • Scientists say full moons have no influence on earthly events. Oh yeah? Then explain why Bill turned into a werewolf and ate 35 Texan chickens!
  • From Fortean Times, an intriguing tale about a mysterious object photographed on the ocean floor in 1964.
  • The planet Venus may once have been habitable?
  • Ford is destroying its stock of TH!NK electric cars, saying they're economically unviable.
  • Japanese Salarymen swelter in business suits during summer. Could air-conditioned jackets be the answer? Or society could be a little more lenient and allow for business people to dress practically in the hot summer months, but no, the complicated option is much better, the Salaryman must wear a shirt and tie at all costs! My heartfelt sympathies go out to the very sweaty and forever suffering Salaryman -- may you get to crack open an ice-cold Asahi after work my friends!
  • There's a new book called Bigfoot The Musical. Not to be confused with a broadway production of Jerry Springer the Opera.
  • Are you an American and can't decide between Bush, Kerry or Nader? Then vote Bono for President (with Tool's leadsinger James Maynard Keenan as Vice-President). When asked if he'd like to enter politics, Bono replied, "I don't think I could live with the pay cut or moving to a smaller house."

Arigato Mitch and Asahi.



Quote of the Day:



I'm sick and tired of party politics. You know, the left, the right - I'm sick of the left, I'm sick of the right. Even the liberals are giving me a pain in the ass. We need new solutions to old problems.

Bono

News Briefs 27-08-2004

I won't kid you - news is slow today. But I'll give you what I've got............

  • Historians of the Stone Age fear that they will have to rip up their theories about Neanderthal Man after doubt has been cast on the carbon dating of skeletons.
  • Textile fragments provide details of ancient lives.
  • The first toilet and sewer system of prehistoric period has been found.
  • Each day, more than 4,000-people visit the place where the mighty thunder god Zeus took the form of a great white bull and won the the love of a girl named Europa.
  • Crocs may have evolved their tough skull before they turned amphibious.
  • What secrets do the Masons hide, not even revealing them to most of their own members?
  • How do UFOs, aliens, and alien abductions find a home at the conservative Baptist Baylor University?
  • The Leaning Tower of Pisa has been stabilized. The Stabilized Tower of Pizza doesn't have a ring to it.
  • London's Natural History Museum welcomes flesh-eating bugs.
  • Do you want the truth about GM crops?
  • Greenpeace is leading the charge to introduce a GM-food fear factor to the Chinese.
  • An online bookmaker is taking bets on the outcome of 10 big scientific endeavors, including the search for life on other planets (10,000:1) and the quest to harness nuclear fusion (100:1) as a substitute for oil.
  • An Australian inventor claims to have made the world's first commercially-viable motor vehicle powered by compressed air.
  • Recreational fishing seriously harms threatened species.
  • From Southern Australia to Scotland to Northern California, entrepreneurs are seeking to generate electricity by channeling the energy of the Earth's oceans.
  • The Unknown Life of Lobsters: Sex, Robots, and Beyond.
  • Mother Nature may give you a toke. A cannabis-like substance is produced by the brain that may keep you from going nuts.
  • From concept to Megalon - everything you always wanted to know about Godzilla. This could be important if you are Japanese, a 9-year old boy, or both.
  • Tons of flying tomatoes streaked the streets red and left 20,000 visitors wallowing in a pond of pulped fruit as a tiny Spanish town celebrated the world's largest food fight.
  • Scientists vote Blade Runner best ever sci-fi film.
  • The United States is preparing for a global flu epidemic.
  • A Cuban woman shipped herself in a wooden crate to the United States.
  • A 16-year old girl was hanged for having a sharp tongue.
  • You can kiss your sovereignty goodbye. The European Union is rapidly descending into Soviet-style totalitarianism. The U.S. is right behind them.
  • You can blame NASA for the peculiar weather.
  • Doctors might soon ask, 'What's your sign?'
  • Scientists discount the full moon's influence on events.
  • Magnets may not really work for pain.
  • Chupacabra's cousin is found in Valparaiso.
  • Tunguska? If any people are more gullible about Unidentified Flying Objects than Americans, it’s the Russians.
  • Unexplainable phenomena have been said to happen at thousands of churches throughout time, but on an early December 2000 morning at San Juan Bautista Mission, even a scientist was astonished.
  • NIDS investigates the Flying Triangle enigma.
  • NASA’s redesigned space shuttle fuel tanks should no longer shed dangerous pieces of foam when launches resume next spring.
  • The ancient history of Venus may have included water and life.
  • The Beagle 2 mission team bites back.

Quote of the Day:

Being eaten by a crocodile is just like going to sleep... in a giant blender.

Homer Simpson

News Briefs 25-08-2004

Anyone seen F for Fake?

  • Noah's ark discovered?
  • Signs of life on Mars: Part 1. Part 2.
  • Lightning bolt kills Danish cows.
  • How can it rain fish?
  • Terrified of needles? Help is on the horizon.
  • Language may shape human thought. And vice versa?
  • Miracle on probability street.
  • A genetically modified survey.
  • When the body says no.
  • Sedna has invisible moon.
  • Pigs test positive for bird flu.
  • Mystery of Wales turtle solved.
  • Jolts of electricity reviving coral reef off Bali coast.
  • Deepest image of exploded star uncovers bipolar jets.
  • New species of shark uncovered in Germany.
  • Researchers are trying to predict how much rain to expect based on how often lightning strikes.
  • Remains of a prehistoric Berber town have been discovered in Western Sahara and are supposedly 15000 years old.
  • Painter jailed for committing masterpieces.
  • Allegations abound that the Holy Grail has been found.
  • Vast new energy source almost here. Wait for the rises in global temperature that will follow.
  • The bizarre evolution of male genitalia. As if the look of a butchered chicken covered in elbow skin weren't enough.
  • Sardine migration one of natures's great wonders. Getting in those tins was a master stroke.
  • Hebrews of the old testament were Arabs. Next it will be neither.
  • Genghis Khan was a contemplative chap.
  • Meteorites supplied Earth life with phosphorus. Earth life? Do they know something?
  • Russia on alert after double jet crash.
  • The Garden of Eden.
  • I'm not guilty, but my brain is.
  • Scientists debate methane on Mars.
  • Viking find extremely significant.

Quote of the Day:

I must believe that at least art is real.

Anon

News Briefs 24-08-2004

Does the internet have a pause button? I'd find that quite handy at times...

  • Ah the glamour of archaeology, sifting through the mud at the bottom of the Hudson River.
  • Across the Middle East, the quest for sacred artifacts and for the lessons they can teach us is taking on new urgency.
  • Was Genghis Khan's pen mightier than his sword? That would be a hell of a pen.
  • The 1400-tonne time bomb that lies at the bottom of the Thames could blow at any time.
  • Stem cell discovery may help diabetics.
  • US scientists genetically engineer mice with twice the endurance capability of normal mice. Say bye-bye to the Olympics folks.
  • Researchers find that fruit flies have sex longer when their body clock is impaired. The world is in turmoil, and science is improving the sex life of fruit flies.
  • We all might be capable of enjoying the pleasure of synesthesia. Shh, can you smell something?
  • Electric shock treatment revives coral reef.
  • God's fragrance descends upon Church two weeks after the prophetic proclamation "When you experience my fragrance, know that my glory is not far behind." Try that line out next time you break wind in an elevator.
  • Better the devil you know in Rennes-le-Chateau.
  • Pope condemns human cloning and arrogance of man. Not sure if he means one man in particular, or all of us in general.
  • Canadian film company releases full-length documentary about Aztec UFO crash.
  • Noah's Ark discovered?
  • Lightning bolt kills 31 Danish cows.
  • It's raining fish, hallelujah it's raining fish.
  • Dowsing: is it science or mysticism?
  • Randi rants about Roswell, Radin and reader queries. Damn, last week was alliteration week here at TDG, what a waste.
  • Hot meteorite found in backyard. Alternatively, it could be a cooked mushroom or fresh dog droppings. No wonder the guy picked it up with a paper towel...
  • Raelians hold public lecture to share their message, and insist they are not 'nuts'.
  • For some strange reason, scientists are unconvinced by the Tunguska UFO story.
  • Mars Odyssey mission gets a new lease on life.
  • Asteroid shaves past the Earth in the nearest miss so far recorded.
  • Exploded star detailed in new Chandra X-ray image.
  • Scientists puzzled by remnants of 1994 Jupiter comet collision.
  • In the loneliness of space, astronauts may one day count on the company of Robonaut. At least it doesn't have one of those funny round mouths.
  • New Moon Rising (Amazon US and UK) details the behind the scenes recent history of NASA, from the Columbia explosion to the release of the Presidential Commission's report on "Moon, Mars and Beyond".
  • Human hibernation being investigated by the European Space Agency (ESA).

Quote of the Day:



The things that will destroy us are: politics without principle; pleasure without conscience; wealth without work; knowledge without character; business without morality; science without humanity; and worship without sacrifice.

Mahatma Gandhi