Who Built the Moon? (Reviewed)

In my own research for "Twisted History: Genesis and the Cosmos", I came across very little in the way of a mythological/biblical explanation for the cosmology of our Moon, which is strange considering how important it is to life on Earth. As lucky and improbable as Planet Earth may be, it still required an equally improbable moon to make it complete. It does beg the question as to whether an already well-endowed Earth got further enhancements along the way. It's a great idea for a book and a great way for Knight and Butler to continue showcasing their fabulous work on ancient units of measure. However, I think they were resting on their laurels a bit in this book. Sadly, it didn't even come close to reaching its full potential.

1) The authors mention an early Russian theory related to a hollow moon, but dismiss it as space-race propaganda on the part of the communist regime. Discussion of subsequent English works on the subject would have been very helpful and appreciated.

2) An in-depth discussion on the artificiality of the Moon's cratering (rather than a passing mention) would have been extremely useful. For example, how could the Moon have maintained its incredibly long stabilizing role if it had been rocked by so many impacts over billions of years? Doesn't this imply the need for some type of regular adjustment/intervention rather than a "make it and forsake it" (Deist-esque) approach argued by the authors.

3) If the Universe is 14 billion years old (at the youngest), then was that enough time for intelligent life to already be established by the time our own solar system was forming? Or are there tell-tale signs that the emergence of "intelligent design/god's handiwork" began taking place sometime after the formation of our solar system? For example, the "Cambrian Explosion" of animal life on Earth around 540 million years ago. Or, if the Moon is primarily responsible for plate tectonics (as the authors agree), then that would be a significant clue in determining the date of the Moon's creation. Unfortunately, scientists do not have a clear idea as to when plate tectonics began or how many times that a super-continent has formed and then broke up. Pangaea existed around 300 million years ago, but it may have not been the first. Still, there is reason to think that this process began closer to a billion years ago than over four billion years ago. (Scientists are likely motivated to postulate crustal plate movement further back than is actually justified.)

4) The authors do not satisfactorily deal with the appearance of the very Megalithic measuring system that they have discovered? They don't like the idea of received knowledge from ET. Nor do they even suspect that this knowledge, once established, was transmitted from the Stone Age to Sumerian and Egyptian civilization and again to the more modern English and Metric systems through some type of cultural mechanism. They seem to think that it was reinvented from scratch each time. Strangely, the authors digress into a discussion on how extinct hominoid species probably interbred and passed on their genetic traits to their successors. However, the authors don't seem to fancy the idea of knowledge being transmitted from one time period down to the next, and even between representatives of the same species!

5) If the Moon is artificial, as the authors conclude, then why must we accept that it was created at the same time our solar system was forming? Wouldn't the sweeping up of solar system debris (and especially hazardous materials within Earth's gravity or orbital belt around the Sun) be something that could have been done at any time in the past 4 billion years? Wouldn't an artificial satellite make for an ideal waste dump for such materials? This makes more sense than the author's suggestion that the great oceanic trenches were scooped out and fashioned into the Moon.

6) If the oldest Moon rocks are a billion years older than the oldest Earth rocks, doesn't that tell us something potentially useful. Unfortunately, the authors don't explore that discrepancy.

7) The authors are enamored by the "message-in-a-bottle" meme, i.e., that when mankind became sophisticated enough they would recognized the creator's work. But, they also cling to a more pragmatic motivation for the Moon's existence, i.e., to simply make Earth conducive to life. There is no reason to think that mankind is the species to end all intelligent species on Earth. In fact, we are not even the best or brightest thus far!

8) The climax of the book occurs when the authors declare that Unidentified/Unknown Creative Agents (UCA's), which they had earlier introduced to the reader quite informally, were not responsible for building the Moon, but that we humans ourselves will in the future travel back billions of years in time and do it! Yet, if going back in time is in fact possible, we would only be able to seed some other early solar system and not bring about our very own. Even in a recursive Universe there must be some sense of causality!