Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 5:26pm
Astronomers have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the center of the distant galaxy 3C 186. The black hole was most likely ejected by the power of gravitational waves.
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New study resolves the structure of the human protein that causes cystic fibrosis

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 5:25pm
In order to better understand how genetic mutations give rise to cystic fibrosis, researchers need to map the protein responsible for the disorder. The new structure has led to new insights on how this molecular channel functions.
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Scientists reveal hidden structures in bacterial DNA

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 5:25pm
Researchers have described the 3D structure of the genome in the extremely small bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae. They discovered previously unknown arrangements of DNA within this tiny bacteria, which are also found in larger cells. Their findings suggest that this type of organization is a universal feature of living cells.
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Sleep deprivation impairs ability to interpret facial expressions

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 5:25pm
When you're tired, your ability to interpret subtle expressions of happiness and sadness can begin to deteriorate, researchers have found. However, the ability to read more primitive survival-based emotions, like anger and fear, remains intact.
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Australia Shelves Copyright Safe Harbor For Google, Facebook

Slashdot - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 5:20pm
In a surprise setback for companies such as Google and Facebook that leverage user-generated content, Australia has dropped plans to extend its copyright safe harbor provisions. From a report: In a blow to Google, Facebook and others, the government dropped the amendments before they were due to be introduced to parliament yesterday. That came as a big surprise, particularly as Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull had given the proposals his seal of approval just last week. "Provisions relating to safe harbor were removed from the bill before its introduction to enable the government to further consider feedback received on this proposal whilst not delaying the passage of other important reforms," Communications Minister Mitch Fifield said in a statement. There can be little doubt that intense lobbying from entertainment industry groups played their part, with a series of articles published in News Corp-owned The Australian piling on the pressure in favor of rightsholders.

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Statins may provide treatment alternative for chronic liver disease

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 5:03pm
Statin drugs are widely used to manage high cholesterol and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. But in a new review of more than 50 studies, researchers cite reductions in liver inflammation and improvements in other related factors as reasons why statins make good candidates for treating chronic liver disease.
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New study shows circular RNA can encode for proteins

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:55pm
Scientists have discovered a protein-encoding function for circular RNA, a form of RNA until now considered non-coding. This kind of RNA molecule is highly active in brain cells. By identifying the function of circRNAs, the research helps advance our understanding of molecular biology, and can be helpful in understanding aging or neuro-degenerative diseases.
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New stem cell method produces millions of human brain and muscle cells in days

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:55pm
Scientists have created a new technique that simplifies the production of human brain and muscle cells -- allowing millions of functional cells to be generated in just a few days. The results open the door to producing a diversity of new cell types that could not be made before in order to study disease.
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Limiting protein reduces post-heart attack injury in mice

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:55pm
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 735,000 Americans experience a heart attack each year. Opening a blocked coronary artery to restore blood flow to the heart prevents sudden cardiac death. However, doing so also triggers cardiac damage through oxidative stress and inflammation, which eventually can lead to heart failure. Researchers have identified a protein that can be targeted to decrease post-heart attack injury and prevent heart failure in a mouse model.
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Climate change and an 'overlooked' nutrient: Silica

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:55pm
Sugar maples may have far greater silica pumping power than expected, and also may be more profoundly affected by climate change as warmer winters damage their vulnerable roots.
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Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:54pm
Pushing the limits of the largest single-aperture millimeter telescope in the world, and coupling it with gravitational lensing, astronomers report that they have detected a surprising rate of star formation, four times higher than previously detected, in a dust-obscured galaxy behind a Frontier Fields cluster.
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Virtual environment education reduces anxiety prior to radiation therapy

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:54pm
Radiation therapists and physicians know that education can reduce anxiety before radiation treatment but lack a standardized tool. In an effort to solve this problem, a multidisciplinary team conducted a pilot study to see if a virtual environment education program could reduce some of the anxiety their patients face.
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Studios Flirt With Offering Movies Early in Home for $30

Slashdot - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:40pm
It looks like Hollywood studios are not kidding around the concept of making the movies available in the home mere weeks after their theatrical debuts. Variety has a new report this week that claims that six out of seven Hollywood studios are in discussions. From the report: However, the companies, particularly Fox and Warner Bros., are showing greater flexibility about timing. Initially, Warner Bros. CEO Kevin Tsujihara had kicked off negotiations with exhibitors by offering to cut them in on a percentage of digital revenues if they agreed to let them debut films on-demand for $50 a rental some 17 days after they opened. Currently, most major movies are only made available to rent some 90 days after their release. Some studios offer films for sale electronically roughly 70 days after their bow in theaters. Other studios, particularly Fox and Universal, felt that $50 was too steep a price to ask consumers to pay. They are now trying to get exhibitors to agree to a plan that would involve a lower priced premium on-demand option that was made available at a slightly later date, according to three studio insiders and two exhibition insiders. Fox and Warner Bros., for instance, are considering making films available between 30 to 45 days after their opening, but at $30 a rental, a price they believe won't give customers sticker shock. Universal, which is seen as being the most aggressive negotiator in these talks, would like the home entertainment debut to remain in the 20-day range.

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Somebody Just Buy the ISS Already

Wired News - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:00pm
An argument for a big investment from some billionaire space lover. The post Somebody Just Buy the ISS Already appeared first on WIRED.
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5 YouTube Gaming Channels That Haven’t Gone Full PewDiePie (Yet)

Wired News - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:00pm
The world of videogame-related YouTube content can be a minefield—so we've got some family-friendly (or at least not wildly problematic) suggestions. The post 5 YouTube Gaming Channels That Haven't Gone Full PewDiePie (Yet) appeared first on WIRED.
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WikiLeaks' New Dump Shows How The CIA Allegedly Hacked Macs and iPhones Almost a Decade Ago

Slashdot - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 4:00pm
WikiLeaks said on Thursday morning it will release new documents it claims are from the Central Intelligence Agency which show the CIA had the capability to bug iPhones and Macs even if their operating systems have been deleted and replaced. From a report on Motherboard: "These documents explain the techniques used by CIA to gain 'persistenc'' on Apple Mac devices, including Macs and iPhones and demonstrate their use of EFI/UEFI and firmware malware," WikiLeaks stated in a press release. EFI and UEFI is the core firmware for Macs, the Mac equivalent to the Bios for PCs. By targeting the UEFI, hackers can compromise Macs and the infection persists even after the operating system is re-installed. The documents are mostly from last decade, except a couple that are dated 2012 and 2013. While the documents are somewhat dated at this point, they show how the CIA was perhaps ahead of the curve in finding new ways to hacking and compromising Macs, according to Pedro Vilaca, a security researcher who's been studying Apple computers for years. Judging from the documents, Vilaca told Motherboard in an online chat, it "looks like CIA were very early adopters of attacks on EFI."

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The Clever ‘DoubleAgent’ Attack Turns Antivirus Into Malware

Wired News - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 3:33pm
The bug potentially puts every Windows antivirus program at risk, but also hints at more fundamental problems with relying on AV. The post The Clever 'DoubleAgent' Attack Turns Antivirus Into Malware appeared first on WIRED.
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Kirkin’ Overtime: The Weird Late-’90s Star Trek Mashup You Didn’t Know About

Wired News - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 3:30pm
Thank you, 1990s videogames and creative editors, for this gloriously terrible gift. The post Kirkin' Overtime: The Weird Late-’90s Star Trek Mashup You Didn't Know About appeared first on WIRED.
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Let There Be Light: Germans Switch on 'Largest Artificial Sun'

Slashdot - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 3:20pm
German scientists are switching on "the world's largest artificial sun" in the hope that intense light sources can be used to generate climate-friendly fuel. From a report: The Synlight experiment in Julich, about 19 miles west of Cologne, consists 149 souped-up film projector spotlights and produces light about 10,000 times the intensity of natural sunlight on Earth. When all the lamps are swivelled to concentrate light on a single spot, the instrument can generate temperatures of around 3,500C -- around two to three times the temperature of a blast furnace. "If you went in the room when it was switched on, you'd burn directly," said Prof Bernard Hoffschmidt, a research director at the German Aerospace Center, where the experiment is housed in a protective radiation chamber. The aim of the experiment is to come up with the optimal setup for concentrating natural sunlight to power a reaction to produce hydrogen fuel.

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The Battle for Top AI Talent Only Gets Tougher From Here

Wired News - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 3:00pm
The company has a new AI lab in the hope of becoming the chipmaker of choice for the world's smartest machines. The post The Battle for Top AI Talent Only Gets Tougher From Here appeared first on WIRED.
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