Quality of biopsy directly linked to survival in patients with bladder cancer

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 4:30pm
The quality of diagnostic staging using biopsy in patients with bladder cancer is directly linked with survival, meaning those that don’t get optimal biopsies are more likely to die from their disease, researchers have shown for the first time.
Categories: Science

Mathematical model shows how brain remains stable during learning

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 4:30pm
Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists. Neuronal networks form a learning machine that allows the brain to extract and store new information from its surroundings via the senses. Researchers have long puzzled over how the brain achieves sensitivity and stability to unexpected new experiences during learning -- two seemingly contradictory requirements.
Categories: Science

Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 4:30pm
Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington’s disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Unlike other techniques that turn one cell type into another, this new process does not pass through a stem cell phase, avoiding the production of multiple cell types, report researchers.
Categories: Science

How the Cloud Can Help Our Government Innovate

Wired News - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 4:27pm

“It’s all about the cloud.”  We hear or see that phrase in meetings, presentations, email pitches, articles — constantly. Aside from the trend, cloud in the federal government is fueled by three essential trends: Agencies are seeking a Cloud First approach in their new technology investments;  They need to do more with existing or fewer resources; and, Government leaders have a desire […]

The post How the Cloud Can Help Our Government Innovate appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

'Interstellar' Actors Quizzed on Space Trivia in New Video

Space.com - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 3:59pm
How much do the stars of the highly anticipated movie "Interstellar" really know about space? Entertainment Weekly attempted to find out in a newly released video that features three of the space film's stars answering a series of trivia questions.
Categories: Science

Shooting At Canadian Parliament

Slashdot - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 3:55pm
CBC reports that a man pulled up to the War Memorial in downtown Ottawa, got out of his car, and shot a soldier with a rifle. The Memorial is right next to the Canadian Parliament buildings. A shooter (reportedly the same one, but unconfirmed) also approached Parliament and got inside before he was shot and killed. "Scott Walsh, who was working on Parliament Hill, said ... the man hopped over the stone fence that surrounds Parliament Hill, with his gun forcing someone out of their car. He then drove to the front doors of Parliament and fired at least two shots, Walsh said." Canadian government officials were quickly evacuated from the building, while the search continues for further suspects. This comes a day after Canada raised its domestic terrorism threat level. Most details of the situation are still unconfirmed -- CBC has live video coverage here. They have confirmed that there was a second shooting at the Rideau Center, a shopping mall nearby.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Categories: Science

Shooting At Canadian Parliament

Slashdot - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 3:55pm
CBC reports that a man pulled up to the War Memorial in downtown Ottawa, got out of his car, and shot a soldier with a rifle. The Memorial is right next to the Canadian Parliament buildings. A shooter (reportedly the same one, but unconfirmed) also approached Parliament and got inside before he was shot and killed. "Scott Walsh, who was working on Parliament Hill, said ... the man hopped over the stone fence that surrounds Parliament Hill, with his gun forcing someone out of their car. He then drove to the front doors of Parliament and fired at least two shots, Walsh said." Canadian government officials were quickly evacuated from the building, while the search continues for further suspects. This comes a day after Canada raised its domestic terrorism threat level. Most details of the situation are still unconfirmed -- CBC has live video coverage here. They have confirmed that there was a second shooting at the Rideau Center, a shopping mall nearby.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

What It Took For SpaceX To Become a Serious Space Company

Slashdot - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 3:47pm
An anonymous reader writes: The Atlantic has a nice profile of SpaceX's rise to prominence — how a private startup managed to successfully compete with industry giants like Boeing in just a decade of existence. "Regardless of its inspirations, the company was forced to adopt a prosaic initial goal: Make a rocket at least 10 times cheaper than is possible today. Until it can do that, neither flowers nor people can go to Mars with any economy. With rocket technology, Musk has said, "you're really left with one key parameter against which technology improvements must be judged, and that's cost." SpaceX currently charges $61.2 million per launch. Its cost-per-kilogram of cargo to low-earth orbit, $4,653, is far less than the $14,000 to $39,000 offered by its chief American competitor, the United Launch Alliance. Other providers often charge $250 to $400 million per launch; NASA pays Russia $70 million per astronaut to hitch a ride on its three-person Soyuz spacecraft. SpaceX's costs are still nowhere near low enough to change the economics of space as Musk and his investors envision, but they have a plan to do so (of which more later)."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Where Is Your Homework Grade Now?

Wired News - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 3:23pm

This app solves math equations just by looking at them. And no, it's probably not going to make us dumber.

The post Where Is Your Homework Grade Now? appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Ebolanoia: The Only Thing We Have to Fear is Ebola Fear Itself

Wired News - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 3:06pm

The Ebola epidemic in Africa looks likely to continue for months more, and it's possible that another traveler might make it to the United States, either covertly or innocently. If so, let's try to keep our Ebolanoia under control.

The post Ebolanoia: The Only Thing We Have to Fear is Ebola Fear Itself appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

Slashdot - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 3:05pm
HughPickens.com writes: Brian Fung reports at the Washington Post that earlier this year emergency services went dark for over six hours for more than 11 million people across seven states. "The outage may have gone unnoticed by some, but for the more than 6,000 people trying to reach help, April 9 may well have been the scariest time of their lives." In a 40-page report (PDF), the FCC found that an entirely preventable software error was responsible for causing 911 service to drop. "It could have been prevented. But it was not," the FCC's report reads. "The causes of this outage highlight vulnerabilities of networks as they transition from the long-familiar methods of reaching 911 to [Internet Protocol]-supported technologies." On April 9, the software responsible for assigning the identifying code to each incoming 911 call maxed out at a pre-set limit; the counter literally stopped counting at 40 million calls. As a result, the routing system stopped accepting new calls, leading to a bottleneck and a series of cascading failures elsewhere in the 911 infrastructure. Adm. David Simpson, the FCC's chief of public safety and homeland security, says having a single backup does not provide the kind of reliability that is ideal for 911. "Miami is kind of prone to hurricanes. Had a hurricane come at the same time [as the multi-state outage], we would not have had that failover, perhaps. So I think there needs to be more [distribution of 911 capabilities]."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

An effective, cost-saving way to detect natural gas pipeline leaks

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 2:35pm
Major leaks from oil and gas pipelines have led to home evacuations, explosions, millions of dollars in lawsuit payouts and valuable natural resources escaping into the air, ground and water. Scientists say they have now developed a new software-based method that finds leaks even when they're small, which could help prevent serious incidents -- and save money for customers and industry.
Categories: Science

A 'Star Wars' laser bullet -- this is what it really looks like

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 2:35pm
Action-packed science-fiction movies often feature colourful laser bolts. But what would a real laser missile look like during flight, if we could only make it out? How would it illuminate its surroundings?
Categories: Science

Skin patch could replace the syringe for disease diagnosis

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 2:35pm
Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could one day replace the syringe. Scientists now they have designed and successfully tested, for the first time, a small skin patch that detected malaria proteins in live mice. It could someday be adapted for use in humans to diagnose other diseases, too.
Categories: Science

Olive oil more stable and healthful than seed oils for frying food

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 2:35pm
Frying is one of the world's most popular ways to prepare food -- think fried chicken and french fries. Even candy bars and whole turkeys have joined the list. But before dunking your favorite food in a vat of just any old oil, consider using olive. Scientists report that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils to yield more healthful food.
Categories: Science

Automated tracking increases compliance of flu vaccination for health-care personnel

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 2:35pm
Tracking influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel through an automated system increased vaccination compliance and reduced workload burden on human resources and occupational health staff, a study shows.
Categories: Science

Proper dental care linked to reduced risk of respiratory infections in ICU patients

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 2:35pm
Vulnerable patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who received enhanced oral care from a dentist were at significantly less risk for developing a lower respiratory tract infection, like ventilator-associated pneumonia, during their stay, research shows.
Categories: Science

Association between air toxics, childhood autism

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 2:35pm
Children with autism spectrum disorder were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers' pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to the preliminary findings of an investigation of American children.
Categories: Science

Aphthous ulcers: Causes of mucosal inflammation unclear

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 2:34pm
A painful inflamed lesion on the oral mucosa, which often seems to be burning at the periphery: every third individual has at one point had such a lesion -- an aphthous ulcer. Often they resolve after a brief period of time. In 2 to 10 percent of patients these lesions are recurrent and require medical treatment.
Categories: Science

Sopping up proteins with thermosponges

Science Daily - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 2:34pm
A research team has developed and tested a novel nanoparticle platform that efficiently delivers clinically important proteins in vivo in initial proof-of-concept tests.
Categories: Science