UK Police Warn Sharing James Foley Killing Video Is a Crime

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 7:04am
An anonymous reader points out that UK authorities have warned that sharing the video of the James Foley murder could lead to prosecution under anti-terror laws. Scotland Yard has warned internet users they could be arrested under terrorism legislation if they viewed or shared the video of James Foley's murder, as Twitter and YouTube attempted to remove all trace of the footage from the web. Twitter suspended dozens of accounts that published the graphic footage while YouTube tried to remove several copies of the video, which was first uploaded on Tuesday night. Twitter CEO Dick Costolo tweeted: "We have been and are actively suspending accounts as we discover them related to this graphic imagery. Thank you." The unprecedented social media clampdown came as the Metropolitan police warned that even viewing the video could constitute a criminal offence in the UK. The force said in a statement: "The MPS counter-terrorism command (SO15) is investigating the contents of the video that was posted online in relation to the alleged murder of James Foley. We would like to remind the public that viewing, downloading or disseminating extremist material within the UK may constitute an offence under terrorism legislation."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK Police Warn Sharing James Foley Killing Video Is a Crime

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 7:04am
An anonymous reader points out that UK authorities have warned that sharing the video of the James Foley murder could lead to prosecution under anti-terror laws. Scotland Yard has warned internet users they could be arrested under terrorism legislation if they viewed or shared the video of James Foley's murder, as Twitter and YouTube attempted to remove all trace of the footage from the web. Twitter suspended dozens of accounts that published the graphic footage while YouTube tried to remove several copies of the video, which was first uploaded on Tuesday night. Twitter CEO Dick Costolo tweeted: "We have been and are actively suspending accounts as we discover them related to this graphic imagery. Thank you." The unprecedented social media clampdown came as the Metropolitan police warned that even viewing the video could constitute a criminal offence in the UK. The force said in a statement: "The MPS counter-terrorism command (SO15) is investigating the contents of the video that was posted online in relation to the alleged murder of James Foley. We would like to remind the public that viewing, downloading or disseminating extremist material within the UK may constitute an offence under terrorism legislation."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Delivery by drone: will it work?

Kurzweil AI - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 6:09am

(Credit: Christine Daniloff/MIT – photograph of quadrotor courtesy of the researchers)

MIT researchers have devised computational solutions to reduce the chances that Amazon’s planned delivery drones will crash and burn — along with your stuff.

It’s complicated. Drones have to deal with iffy factors like high winds, low fuel/power level, component failures, and even possible shooters in some locations.

So with Boeing support, the researchers developed two fixes.

  • An algorithm enables a drone to monitor aspects of its “health” in real time.
  • An efficient way to compute possible future locations and routes to reach a destination without colliding with obstacles, using a Markov Decision Process (MDP), a sequential decision-making framework that resembles a “tree” of possible actions.

Meanwhile, it looks like India, not the U.S. (with its restrictive aviation laws), will be Amazon’s launch pad for its ts Prime Air drone, with trials planned in Mumbai and Bangalore (cities where Amazon has warehouses) this fall, according to The Economic Times.

Abstract of IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems presentation

In persistent missions, taking system’s health and capability degradation into account is an essential factor to predict and avoid failures. The state space in health-aware planning problems is often a mixture of continuous vehicle-level and discrete mission-level states. This in particular poses a challenge when the mission domain is partially observable and restricts the use of computationally expensive forward search methods. This paper presents a method that exploits a structure that exists in many health-aware planning problems and performs a two-layer planning scheme. The lower layer exploits the local linearization and Gaussian distribution assumption over vehicle-level states while the higher layer maintains a non-Gaussian distribution over discrete mission-level variables. This two-layer planning scheme allows us to limit the expensive online forward search to the mission-level states, and thus predict system’s behavior over longer horizons in the future. We demonstrate the performance of the method on a long duration package delivery mission using a quadrotor in a partially-observable domain in the presence of constraints and health/capability degradation.

Categories: Science

The Star That Exploded At the Dawn of Time

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 4:26am
sciencehabit writes To probe the dawn of time, astronomers usually peer far away; but now they've made a notable discovery close to home. An ancient star a mere thousand light-years from Earth bears chemical elements that may have been forged by the death of a star that was both extremely massive and one of the first to arise after the big bang. If confirmed, the finding means that some of the universe's first stars were so massive they died in exceptionally violent explosions that altered the growth of early galaxies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Cause of Global Warming 'Hiatus' Found Deep In the Atlantic

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 2:02am
vinces99 writes with news about a study that may account for a slowdown in air temperature rises. Following rapid warming in the late 20th century, this century has so far seen surprisingly little increase in the average temperature at the Earth's surface. More than a dozen theories have now been proposed for the so-called global warming hiatus, ranging from air pollution to volcanoes to sunspots. New research from the University of Washington shows the heat absent from the surface is plunging deep in the north and south Atlantic Ocean, and is part of a naturally occurring cycle. The study is published in Science. Subsurface ocean warming explains why global average air temperatures have flatlined since 1999, despite greenhouse gases trapping more solar heat at the Earth's surface. "Every week there's a new explanation of the hiatus," said corresponding author Ka-Kit Tung, a UW professor of applied mathematics and adjunct faculty member in atmospheric sciences. "Many of the earlier papers had necessarily focused on symptoms at the surface of the Earth, where we see many different and related phenomena. We looked at observations in the ocean to try to find the underlying cause." What they found is that a slow-moving current in the Atlantic, which carries heat between the two poles, sped up earlier this century to draw heat down almost a mile (1,500 meters). Most previous studies focused on shorter-term variability or particles that could block incoming sunlight, but they could not explain the massive amount of heat missing for more than a decade.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Scientists Developing Remote-Control Cyborg Moths

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 12:30am
Zothecula writes We've been hearing a lot about the development of tiny flying sensor-equipped robots, that could be sent into areas such as disaster sites to seek out survivors or survey the damage. However, why go to the trouble of designing those robots from scratch, when there are already ready-made insects that are about the right size? That's the thinking behind research being conducted at North Carolina State University, which is aimed at converting moths into "biobots".

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Facebook’s Plan to Make Apps Work Like Webpages Gathers Momentum

Wired News - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 12:27am
Facebook says that hundreds of online companies have adopted its plan to let mobile apps operate more like the world wide web, seamlessly linking together in much the same way that pages do inside your web browser. According to Facebook’s Vijay Shankar, these companies have published over 3 billion “App Links” to the net, exposing […]






Categories: Science

How Does Tesla Build a Supercharger Charging Site?

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:51pm
cartechboy writes Tesla's Superchargers are the talk of the electric car community. These charging stations can take a Model S battery pack from nearly empty to about 150 miles of range in around 30 minutes. That's crazy fast, and it's nothing short of impressive. But what does it take to actually build a Tesla Supercharger site? Apparently a lot of digging. A massive trench is created to run high-capacity electric cables before the charging stations themselves are even installed. A diagram and photos of the Electric Conduit Construction build out have surfaced on the Internet. The conduits connect the charging stations to a power distribution center, which in turn is connected to a transformer that provides the power for charging cars. It took 11 days to install the six charging stalls in Goodland, Kansas. If you thought it was a quick process to build a Supercharger station, you were clearly wrong.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Slashdot - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 11:08pm
tlhIngan writes Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Voyager 2's 'Hair-Raising' Fly-By Of Triton Animated

Space.com - Thu, 21/08/2014 - 10:41pm
The probe passed within 25,000 miles (40,000 km) of the Neptune moon in August 1989. Highly detailed maps from Voyager were used to recreate the surface colors. Full Story: http://goo.gl/FdROmX
Categories: Science