Lap band surgery benefits very obese adolescents

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:41pm
Lap band surgery has significant benefits for severely obese teenagers and, despite its controversial nature, should still be considered as a first option to manage obesity during adolescence, a new study has found.
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Public reporting of lung cancer surgery outcomes provides valuable information about quality of patient care

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:40pm
The first publicly accessible national report of outcomes from lobectomy has now been released by experts.
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Chip-sized, high-speed terahertz modulator raises possibility of faster data transmission

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:40pm
Engineers have invented a chip-sized, high-speed modulator that operates at terahertz (THz) frequencies and at room temperature at low voltages without consuming DC power. The discovery could help fill the “THz gap” that is limiting development of new and more powerful wireless devices that could transmit data at significantly higher speeds than currently possible.
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Trapped by the game: Why professional soccer players don't talk about their mental health

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:39pm
Professional soccer players do not feel it is safe to show vulnerability or admit to experiencing emotional struggles, suggests a new report.
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Mars and Venus on the therapist's couch

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:39pm
Generally speaking, men want a quick fix from psychological therapy and women want to talk about their feelings, concludes a new study.
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Great differences in the view of withdrawing futile intensive care

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:38pm
The views among physicians and the general public when it comes to deciding whether to withhold or withdraw treatment of terminally ill patients differ greatly. However, in a hypothetical case study of a clearly hopeless medical case, great unanimity among physicians’ and the public’s assessments could be seen with regards to cancelling treatment or offering relief at the final stages of life.
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New study will help find the best locations for thermal power stations in Iceland

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:38pm
A new research article gives indications of the best places in Iceland to build thermal power stations.
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Employee wages not just linked to skills, but quality of co-workers

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:38pm
The presence of high-performing co-workers can improve an individual’s earnings, research has shown.
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Major Viking Age manor discovered at Birka, Sweden

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:38pm
For centuries it has been speculated where the manor of the royal bailiff of Birka, Herigar, might have been located. New geophysical results provide evidence of its location at Korshamn, outside the town rampart of the Viking Age proto-town Birka in Sweden.
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New theory may explain mystery of Fairy Circles of Namibia

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:38pm
One of nature's greatest mysteries -- the 'Fairy Circles' of Namibia -- may have been unraveled by researchers. The study suggests that the interaction between termite engineering and the self-organization of vegetation could be jointly responsible for the phenomenon.
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Eco-HAB: New quality in research on neuronal basis of social behavior

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:35pm
How the brain controls social behaviors and what exactly the neuronal impairments causing its pathologies are, is yet to be determined. To better understand mechanisms in play, scientists perform thousands of tests of social interactions, usually conducted in mice. However, such assays are highly irreproducible, which significantly impedes making new discoveries. To address this issue scientists have built a murine “Big Brother”: a computerized system called Eco-HAB, designed to screen mice for impairments of social behavior.
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More than half of atrial fibrillation patients become asymptomatic after catheter ablation

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:35pm
More than half of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) become asymptomatic after catheter ablation, reports the largest study of the procedure.
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School curricula are a reflection of society's expectations

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:35pm
In a pioneering project, researchers studied the development of school curricula in Switzerland’s three main language regions. This project clearly showed that ever since the Swiss school system was created in 1830 the importance and content of every subject in the curriculum, whether language, history, handicraft or physical education, has been in flux.
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Protein complex prevents genome instability

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:35pm
An international research collaboration is investigating the repair process of a serious form of DNA damage that can lead to instability of genetic material and tumor formation. The researchers are studying the roles of groups of proteins that control the repair of double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA that occur from internal or external sources, such as UV irradiation.
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Raw materials for meatballs, falafel from mealworms and crickets

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:35pm
A research team has developed food ingredients from mealworms and crickets which, due to their promising structure and flavor, have the potential to be used in the manufacture of foods such as meatballs and falafel. EU legislation will change in the coming years, and the farming of insects and their processing for consumption will become a business activity also in Europe, they say.
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Molecule flash mob

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:35pm
Neurotransmitter transporters are some of the most popular transport proteins in research as they play a major role in the processing of signals in the brain. A new study has now successfully demonstrated for the first time the structural impact of membrane lipids on medically relevant serotonin transporters.
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Pluto 'Landing' In Color Created From New Horizons' Imagery | Video

Space.com - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:16pm
Over 100 images from NASA New Horizons mission, which flew within 7,800 miles (12,500 km) of the icy dwarf, were used to simulate the descent seen here.
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Slovakia’s Hyperloop Moves a Step Closer to Not Being a Joke

Wired News - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:00pm
Hyperloop Transportation Technologies strikes a deal to explore extending its plans to the Czech Republic. The post Slovakia's Hyperloop Moves a Step Closer to Not Being a Joke appeared first on WIRED.
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Fighting Cancer’s Crisis of Confidence, One Study at a Time

Wired News - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:00pm
The Reproducibility Project announces its initial cancer study results today. The post Fighting Cancer's Crisis of Confidence, One Study at a Time appeared first on WIRED.
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How the Human Brain Decides What Is Important and What's Not

Slashdot - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 1:00pm
New submitter baalcat writes: A new study reported by Neuroscience News sheds light on how we learn to pay attention in order to make the most of our life experiences. From the report: "The Wizard of Oz told Dorothy to 'pay no attention to that man behind the curtain' in an effort to distract her, but a new Princeton University study sheds light on how people learn and make decisions in real-world situations. The findings could eventually contribute to improved teaching and learning and the treatment of mental and addiction disorders in which people's perspectives are dysfunctional or fractured. Participants in the study performed a multidimensional trial-and-error learning task, while researchers scanned their brains using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The researchers found that selective attention is used to determine the value of different options. The results also showed that selective attention shapes what we learn when something unexpected happens. For example, if your pizza is better or worse than expected, you attribute the learning to whatever your attention was focused on and not to features you decided to ignore. Finally, the researchers found that what we learn through this process teaches us what to pay attention to, creating a feedback cycle -- we learn about what we attend to, and we attend to what we learned high values for. 'If we want to understand learning, we can't ignore the fact that learning is almost always done in a multidimensional 'cluttered' environment,' says senior author Yael Niv, an associate professor in psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute. 'We want kids to listen to the teacher, but a lot is going on in the classroom -- there is so much to look at inside it and out the window. So, it's important to understand how exactly attention and learning interact and how they shape each other.'" The study has been published in the journal Neuron.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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