Luck affects how we judge reckless actions

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:12am
A person, who acts immorally or recklessly but is “lucky” by escaping dire consequences, is judged less harshly than an “unlucky” person, even when both have committed the same act. "Moral luck" is a term used in philosophy that describes situations in which a person is subjected to moral judgments by others despite the fact that the assessment is based on factors beyond his or her control, i.e. "luck."
Categories: Science

Vitamin D supplements have little effect on risk of falls in older people

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:12am
A new meta-analysis concludes that there is no evidence to suggest that vitamin D supplements prevent falls, and that ongoing trials to test this theory are unlikely to change this result. Falls can be devastating for older people, and strategies to reduce fall risk are urgently needed as the global population ages. The results of trials that have investigated the ability of vitamin D to prevent falls -- and those of previous meta-analyses -- have been mixed. It is unclear how vitamin D supplements might prevent falls but, until now.
Categories: Science

Recurrent violence linked to substantially higher rates of mental disorders in post-conflict communities

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:12am
In the aftermath of war, communities who continue to experience repeated violence could have a major escalation in rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and severe distress, suggests new research. Investigators conducted a survey in 2004 to estimate the prevalence of common mental disorders among 1022 adults in Timor Leste four years after the end of a long-running and violent war against Indonesian occupation, and again in 2010–11, following a period of prolonged internal conflict.
Categories: Science

Death rates from pancreatic cancer rising; rates for all other cancers, except female lung cancer, continue to fall in Europe

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:12am
Pancreatic cancer is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in men and women rather than decrease in 2014 and beyond, according to a comprehensive study. The study looked at cancer rates in the whole of the EU (27 member states as at 2007) and also in the six largest countries – France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain and the UK – for all cancers, and, individually, for stomach, intestines, pancreas, lung, prostate, breast, uterus (including cervix) and leukaemias.
Categories: Science

New shape discovered using rubber bands

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:12am
While setting out to fabricate new springs to support a cephalopod-inspired imaging project, a group of researchers stumbled upon a surprising discovery: the hemihelix, a shape rarely seen in nature. This made the researchers wonder: Were the three-dimensional structures they observed randomly occurring, or are there specific factors that control their formation? The scientists answered that question by performing experiments in which they stretched, joined, and then released rubber strips.
Categories: Science

Stem cells in circulating blood affect cardiovascular health

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:11am
New research suggests that attempts to isolate an elusive adult stem cell from blood to understand and potentially improve cardiovascular health -- a task considered possible but very difficult -- might not be necessary. Instead, scientists have found that multiple types of cells with primitive characteristics circulating in the blood appear to provide the same benefits expected from a stem cell, including the endothelial progenitor cell that is the subject of hot pursuit.
Categories: Science

Band Releases Album As Linux Kernel Module

Slashdot - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:08am
netbuzz (955038) writes "A band called netcat is generating buzz in software circles by releasing its debut album as a Linux kernel module (among other more typical formats.) 'Are you ever listening to an album, and thinking "man, this sounds good, but I wish it crossed from user-space to kernel-space more often!" We got you covered,' the band says on its Facebook page. 'Our album is now fully playable as a loadable Linux kernel module.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

WhatsApp Is Well On Its Way To A Billion Users

Slashdot - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 12:52am
redletterdave (2493036) writes "In just two months since Facebook dropped $19 billion to buy WhatsApp, the five-year-old mobile messaging app on Tuesday announced its its active user base has grown to more than half a billion people. This is not the first time that an app has seen a major pop in users after it was acquired by Facebook: When Facebook bought Instagram in April 2012, the service boasted some 30 million users. In one month after the deal, Instagram gained 20 million new users. By July, Instagram grew to 80 million active users. WhatsApp seems to be having a similar growth spurt, gaining roughly 25 million users each month since the Facebook deal was announced."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

NYPD's Twitter Campaign Backfires

Slashdot - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 12:03am
An anonymous reader writes "A NYPD community outreach campaign designed to show images of citizens with cops turned ugly quickly when a deluge of images depicting police brutality came in. From the article: 'The responses soon turned ugly when Occupy Wall Street tweeted a photograph of cops battling protesters with the caption "changing hearts and minds one baton at a time." Other photos included an elderly man bloodied after being arrested for jaywalking.' Police Commissioner Bill Bratton says, 'I kind of welcome the attention,' of the #myNYPD project."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

F.C.C., In Net Neutrality Turnaround, Plans To Allow Fast Lane

Slashdot - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 11:17pm
Dega704 (1454673) writes in with news of the latest FCC plan which seems to put another dagger in the heart of net neutrality. "The Federal Communications Commission will propose new rules that allow Internet service providers to offer a faster lane through which to send video and other content to consumers, as long as a content company is willing to pay for it, according to people briefed on the proposals. The proposed rules are a complete turnaround for the F.C.C. on the subject of so-called net neutrality, the principle that Internet users should have equal ability to see any content they choose, and that no content providers should be discriminated against in providing their offerings to consumers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Mobile Game Attempts To Diagnose Alzheimer's

Slashdot - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 10:50pm
the_newsbeagle writes "Currently, the best way to check if a person has a high likelihood of developing Alzheimer's is to perform a PET scan to measure the amount of amyloid plaque in his or her brain. That's an expensive procedure. But a startup called Akili Interactive says it has developed a mobile game that can identify likely Alzheimer's patients just by their gameplay and game results. The game is based on a neuroscience study which showed that multitasking is one of the first brain functions to take a hit in Alzheimer's patients. Therefore the game requires players to perform two tasks at the same time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Apple Sales Numbers Show iPad Fever Is Officially Cooling

Wired News - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 10:43pm
For the first time, analysts, investors, and the public widely expected Apple to post a drop in iPad sales numbers during its second quarter earnings today. And the numbers didn't lie: The public is not gobbling up iPads like they used to.






Categories: Science

OpenSSL: the New Face of Technology Monoculture

Slashdot - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 10:30pm
chicksdaddy writes: "In a now-famous 2003 essay, 'Cyberinsecurity: The Cost of Monopoly,' Dr. Dan Geer argued, persuasively, that Microsoft's operating system monopoly constituted a grave risk to the security of the United States and international security, as well. It was in the interest of the U.S. government and others to break Redmond's monopoly, or at least to lessen Microsoft's ability to 'lock in' customers and limit choice. The essay cost Geer his job at the security consulting firm AtStake, which then counted Microsoft as a major customer. These days Geer is the Chief Security Officer at In-Q-Tel, the CIA's venture capital arm. But he's no less vigilant of the dangers of software monocultures. In a post at the Lawfare blog, Geer is again warning about the dangers that come from an over-reliance on common platforms and code. His concern this time isn't proprietary software managed by Redmond, however, it's common, oft-reused hardware and software packages like the OpenSSL software at the heart (pun intended) of Heartbleed. 'The critical infrastructure's monoculture question was once centered on Microsoft Windows,' he writes. 'No more. The critical infrastructure's monoculture problem, and hence its exposure to common mode risk, is now small devices and the chips which run them.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Pulp Hero Flash Gordon May Be Headed Back to the Big Screen

Wired News - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 10:11pm
Fox has reportedly snagged the rights to pulp hero Flash Gordon. Adapting the character has been popular for decades, with varying results. Here's what it needs to succeed.






Categories: Science

Feds Beg Supreme Court to Let Them Search Phones Without a Warrant

Wired News - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 9:56pm
American law enforcement has long advocated for universal "kill switches" in cellphones to cut down on mobile device thefts. Now the Department of Justice argues that the same remote locking and data-wiping technology represents a threat to police investigations--one that means they should be free to search phones without a warrant.






Categories: Science

Implant Injects DNA Into Ear, Improves Hearing

Slashdot - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 9:47pm
sciencehabit writes "Many people with profound hearing loss have been helped by devices called cochlear implants, but their hearing is still far from perfect. They often have trouble distinguishing different musical pitches, for example, or hearing a conversation in a noisy room. Now, researchers have found a clever way of using cochlear implants to deliver new genes into the ear — a therapy that, in guinea pigs, dramatically improves hearing (abstract)."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Witcher 3</em> and Projekt Red's DRM-Free Stand

Slashdot - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 9:26pm
An anonymous reader writes "This article goes into the making of upcoming fantasy title The Witcher 3. The studio, CD Projekt Red, reveals that, unusually, it'll be releasing the game as a DRM-free download. 'We believe that DRM does more harm to legit gamers than good for the gaming industry, that's why the game will also be completely DRM-free,' says the game's level designer, Miles Tost. The game will build on the strengths of The Witcher 2 while attempting to broaden its scope. 'We want to combine the strong pull of closed-world RPGs story-wise, with a world where you can go anywhere and do anything you want.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Solar Eclipse Will Transform Sun into 'Ring of Fire' Next Week

Space.com - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 9:23pm
The sun will look like a ring of fire above some remote parts of the world next Tuesday (April 29) during a solar eclipse, but most people around the world won't get a chance to see it.
Categories: Science

Innovation improves drowsy driver detection

Science Daily - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 9:09pm
A new way to detect when drivers are about to nod off behind the wheel has been developed. "Video-based systems that use cameras to detect when a car is drifting out of its lane are cumbersome and expensive. They don't work well on snow-covered or curvy roads, in darkness or when lane markers are faded or missing. Our invention provides an inexpensive and user-friendly technology that overcomes these limitations and can help catch fatigue earlier, well before accidents are likely to happen," said a developer of the device.
Categories: Science

Drought may take toll on Congo rainforest, NASA satellites show

Science Daily - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 9:09pm
A new analysis of NASA satellite data shows Africa's Congo rainforest, the second-largest tropical rainforest in the world, has undergone a large-scale decline in greenness over the past decade. Scientists use the satellite-derived "greenness" of forest regions as one indicator of a forest's health. While this study looks specifically at the impact of a persistent drought in the Congo region since 2000, researchers say that a continued drying trend might alter the composition and structure of the Congo rainforest, affecting its biodiversity and carbon storage.
Categories: Science