Tidal forces gave moon its shape early in its history, new analysis finds

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:31pm
The shape of the moon deviates from a simple sphere in ways that scientists have struggled to explain. A new study shows that most of the moon's overall shape can be explained by taking into account tidal effects acting early in the moon's history. The results provide insights into the moon's early history, its orbital evolution, and its current orientation in the sky.
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Scientists call for new strategy in pursuit of HIV-free generation

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:31pm
In light of the recent news that HIV has been detected in the Mississippi baby previously thought to have been cured of the disease, researchers are assessing how to help those born to HIV-infected mothers. These infants around the world are in need of new immune-based protective strategies, including vaccines delivered to mothers and babies and the means to boost potentially protective maternal antibodies, say researchers.
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Double star with weird and wild planet-forming discs

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:29pm
Astronomers have found wildly misaligned planet-forming gas discs around the two young stars in the binary system HK Tauri. These new observations provide the clearest picture ever of protoplanetary discs in a double star. The new result also helps to explain why so many exoplanets — unlike the planets in the Solar System — came to have strange, eccentric or inclined orbits.
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Birthweight and breastfeeding have implications for children's health decades later

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:24pm
Young adults who were breastfed for three months or more as babies have a significantly lower risk of chronic inflammation associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, according to new research.
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Dissolvable fabric loaded with medicine might offer faster protection against HIV

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:24pm
Bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other topical materials.
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Appreciation for fat jokes, belief in obese stereotypes linked

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:24pm
From movies to television, obesity is still considered “fair game” for jokes and ridicule. A new study took a closer look at weight-related humor to see if anti-fat attitudes played into a person’s appreciation or distaste for fat humor in the media.
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Finding quantum 'lines of desire': Physicists track quantum system's wanderings through quantum state space

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:24pm
What paths do quantum particles, such as atoms or photons, follow through quantum state space? Scientists have used an "artificial atom" to continuously and repeatedly record the paths through quantum state space. From the cobweb of a million paths, a most likely path between two quantum states emerged, much as social trails emerge as people round off corners or cut across lawns between buildings.
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Quiet Cooling With a Copper Foam Heatsink

Slashdot - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:13pm
Zothecula writes: The Silent Power PC is claimed to be the first high-end PC able to ditch noisy electric fans in favor of fully passive cooling. In place of a conventional fan, the unit uses an open-air metal foam heatsink that boasts an enormous surface area thanks to the open-weave copper filaments of which it's composed. The Silent Power creators claim that the circulation of air through the foam is so efficient in dissipating heat that the exterior surface temperature never rises above 50 C (122 F) in normal use.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Weird Orbits of Alien Planets May Be Due to Twin Stars

Space.com - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:04pm
Some of the oddly skewed orbits of many alien worlds may be due to the twin stars they are often found circling, a new study suggests.
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Early Earth: A Battered, Hellish World with Water Oases for Life

Space.com - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:03pm
Cosmic bombardment of the early Earth repeatedly covered the planet's surface with molten rock during its earliest days, but still may have left oases of water that could have supported the evolution of life, scientists say.
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Double Star Is Forming Planets At Funky Angles | Video

Space.com - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:03pm
The binary system HK Tauri's ‘wildly misaligned’ discs of dust and gas may help explain why some exoplanets have eccentric orbits around their Suns. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) imaged the system. More: http://goo.gl/XMR3Hz
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How the Moon Got Its Lemon Shape

Space.com - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 5:03pm
Tidal forces exerted during the solar system's youth can explain most of the moon's large-scale topography, including its slight lemon shape, reports the study, which was published online today (July 30) in the journal Nature.
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Dark Data, Amber, and Attenborough

Wired News - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 4:45pm
A new pygmy grasshopper found in amber is named for Sir David Attenborough. Featuring a video explainer narrated by Sir David himself!






Categories: Science

UK To Allow Driverless Cars By January

Slashdot - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 4:29pm
rtoz sends this news from the BBC: The UK government has announced that driverless cars will be allowed on public roads starting in January next year. It also invited cities to compete to host one of three trials of the tech, which would start at the same time. In addition, ministers ordered a review of the UK's road regulations to provide appropriate guidelines. ... The debate now is whether to allow cars, like the prototype unveiled by Google in May, to abandon controls including a steering wheel and pedals and rely on the vehicle's computer. Or whether, instead, to allow the machine to drive, but insist a passenger be ready to wrest back control at a moment's notice.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Supportive moms and sisters boost female baboon's rank

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 4:02pm
A study of dominance in female baboons suggests that the route to a higher rank is to maintain close ties with mom, and to have lots of supportive sisters.
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Money talks when it comes to acceptability of 'sin' companies, study reveals

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 4:02pm
Companies who make their money in the 'sin' industries such as the tobacco, alcohol and gaming industries typically receive less attention from institutional investors and financial analysts. But new research shows social norms and attitudes towards these types of businesses are subject to compromise when their share price looks to be on the rise.
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Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 4:02pm
Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks or botanical gardens in hopes of preserving some genetic diversity. For decades, these seed collections have been guided by simple models that offer a one-size-fits-all approach for how many seeds to gather. A new study, however, has found that more careful tailoring of seed collections to specific species and situations is critical to preserving plant diversity.
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Dimly lit working environments: Correcting body clock is possible

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 4:02pm
Researchers have, for the first time, conducted a study under real conditions on the body clocks of members of an international polar research station. The researchers have shown that a particular kind of artificial light is capable of ensuring that their biological rhythms are correctly synchronized despite the absence of sunlight.
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Naltrexone may be effective in diminishing impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease patients

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 4:01pm
Parkinson's disease (PD) patients may confront a common but largely unrecognized challenge: the occurrence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) such as compulsive gambling, sexual behavior, eating, or spending. A team of investigators conducted a pilot study and found that the opioid antagonist naltrexone may be an effective treatment for diminishing ICD symptoms in PD patients.
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Many depressed preschoolers still suffer in later school years

Science Daily - Wed, 30/07/2014 - 4:01pm
Children diagnosed with depression as preschoolers are likely to suffer from depression as school-age children and young adolescents, new research shows. The investigators followed 246 children, now ages 9 to 12, who were enrolled in the study as preschoolers when they were 3 to 5 years old. The children and their primary caregivers participated in up to six annual and four semiannual assessments. They were screened using a tool called the Preschool Feelings Checklist and evaluated using an age-appropriate diagnostic interview.
Categories: Science