YouTube's $1 Billion Royalties Are Not Enough, Says Music Industry

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:40pm
YouTube said Tuesday that it has paid the music industry over one billion dollars in advertising revenue in the past 12 months. The music industry thinks that sum is not enough. From a report on BBC: "Google has issued more unexplained numbers on what it claims YouTube pays the music industry," said a spokesperson for the global music body, the IFPI. "The announcement gives little reason to celebrate, however. With 800 million music users worldwide, YouTube is generating revenues of just over $1 per user for the entire year. "This pales in comparison to the revenue generated by other services, ranging from Apple to Deezer to Spotify. For example, in 2015 Spotify alone paid record labels some $2bn, equivalent to an estimated $18 per user." In his blog post, Mr Kyncl conceded that the current model was not perfect, arguing: "There is a lot of work that must be done by YouTube and the industry as a whole. "But we are excited to see the momentum," he added.

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Conservation effort spreads seeds of destruction across the Midwest

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:36pm
Weed scientists in at least two Midwestern states have been reporting for years that a conservation program meant to provide habitat for pollinating insects is sowing bad seeds -- including seeds of the potentially devastating agricultural weed Palmer amaranth -- along with the good. Now, researchers have traced the weed seeds to at least one source: pollinator habitat seed sold by a company in the Midwest.
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Novel label-free microscopy enables dynamic, high-resolution imaging of cell interactions

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:36pm
Researchers have invented a novel live-cell imaging method that could someday help biologists better understand how stem cells transform into specialized cells and how diseases like cancer spread. The Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscope (PCEM) is capable of monitoring and quantitatively measuring cell adhesion, a critical process involved cell migration, cell differentiation, cell division, and cell death.
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Knowing one's place in a social hierarchy

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:35pm
When you start a new job, it's normal to spend the first day working out who's who in the pecking order, information that will come in handy for making connections in the future. In an fMRI study, researchers now provide insights into how we acquire knowledge about social hierarchies, and reveal the specific mechanisms at play when that hierarchy is our own (as compared to that of another person).
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Unique visual stimulation may be new treatment for Alzheimer's

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:35pm
Using LED lights flickering at a specific frequency, researchers have shown that they can significantly reduce the beta amyloid plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease in the visual cortex of mice. This treatment appears to work by stimulating brain waves known as gamma oscillations, which the researchers discovered help the brain suppress beta amyloid production and invigorate cells responsible for destroying the plaques.
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Most of Greenland ice melted to bedrock in recent geologic past, says study

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:34pm
Scientists have found evidence in a chunk of bedrock drilled from nearly two miles below the summit of the Greenland ice sheet that the sheet nearly disappeared for an extended time in the last million years or so. The finding casts doubt on assumptions that Greenland has been relatively stable during the recent geological past, and implies that global warming could tip it into decline more precipitously than previously thought.
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Greenland on thin ice?

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:34pm
First-of-their-kind studies provide new insight into the deep history of the Greenland Ice Sheet, looking back millions of years farther than previous techniques allowed. However, the two studies present some strongly contrasting evidence about how Greenland's ice sheet may have responded to past climate change.
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Russia’s Space Program Is Blowing Up. So Are Its Rockets

Wired News - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:27pm
The state of space science over there is nyet good. The post Russia's Space Program Is Blowing Up. So Are Its Rockets appeared first on WIRED.
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Saturn's bulging core implies moons younger than thought

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:23pm
Freshly harvested data from NASA's Cassini mission reveals that the ringed planet's moons may be younger than previously thought.
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Scientists shed new light on how the brain processes, maintains what we don't see

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:23pm
A team of scientists has mapped out how our brains process visuals we don’t even know we’ve seen, indicating that the neuronal encoding and maintenance of subliminal images is more substantial than previously thought.
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Stem cell-based test predicts leukemia patients' response to therapy to help tailor treatment

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:23pm
Leukemia researchers have developed a 17-gene signature derived from leukemia stem cells that can predict at diagnosis if patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will respond to standard treatment.
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Cancer spread is increased by a high fat diet, ground-breaking evidence shows

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:21pm
New research shows that the metastatic process (cancer spread) is enhanced by fat intake. Mice given a high fat diet, including palmitic acid (a major component of palm oil which is found in lots of household products) developed the most aggressive cancer spread. The study identifies for the first time a protein called CD36 which has an essential role in cancer spreading.
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Falsely Accused Movie Pirate Deserves $17K Compensation, Court Says

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:00pm
An Oregon District Court has sided with a wrongfully accused man who was sued for allegedly downloading a pirated copy of the Adam Sandler movie "The Cobbler." According to the court's recommendations, reports TorrentFreak, the man is entitled to more than $17,000 in compensation as the result of the filmmakers "overaggressive" and "unreasonable" tactics. From the article: The defendant in question, Thomas Gonzales, operates an adult foster care home where several people had access to the Internet. The filmmakers were aware of this and during a hearing their counsel admitted that any guest could have downloaded the film. [...] "The Court finds that once Plaintiff learned that the alleged infringement was taking place at an adult group care home at which Gonzales did not reside, Plaintiff's continued pursuit of Gonzales for copyright infringement was objectively unreasonable," Judge Beckerman ruled. "The Court shares Gonzales' concern that Plaintiff is motivated, at least in large part, by extracting large settlements from individual consumers prior to any meaningful litigation. "On balance, the Court has concerns about the motivation behind Plaintiff's overaggressive litigation of this case and other cases, and that factor weighs in favor of fee shifting."

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Beware: Children can passively 'smoke' marijuana, too

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 5:41pm
Relaxing with a joint around children is not very wise. Not only do youngsters inhale harmful secondary smoke in the process, but the psychoactive chemicals in the drug are taken up by their bodies as well.
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Substance present in ayahuasca brew stimulates generation of human neural cells

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 5:41pm
Human neural progenitors exposed to harmine, an alkaloid presented at the psychotropic plant decoction ayahuasca, led to a 70 percent increase in proliferation of these cells. The effect of generating new human neural cells involves the inhibition of DYRK1A, a gene that is over activated in patients with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease. Thus harmine could have a potential neurogenesis role and possibly a therapeutic one over cognitive deficits.
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Partnership at a distance: Deep-frozen helium molecules illuminate quantum-mechanical tunnelling

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 5:41pm
As atomic physicists have now been able to confirm, over 75 percent of the time helium atoms are so far apart that their bond can be explained only by the quantum-mechanical tunnel effect.
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New catalyst for capture and conversion of atmospheric carbon dioxide

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 5:41pm
New research has focused on developing a new catalyst that would lead to large-scale implementation of capture and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
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Taking a Second Look at Coral Bleaching Culprit

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 5:41pm
When it comes to coral health, superoxide -- a natural toxin all oxygen-breathing organisms produce -- gets a bad rap.
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Enzyme that digests vitamin A also may regulate testosterone levels

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 5:40pm
Bco1, an enzyme that metabolizes beta carotene, may play a vital role in testosterone metabolism as well, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Backdoor Accounts Found in 80 Sony IP Security Camera Models

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 5:20pm
Many network security cameras made by Sony could be taken over by hackers and infected with botnet malware if their firmware is not updated to the latest version. Researchers from SEC Consult have found two backdoor accounts that exist in 80 models of professional Sony security cameras, mainly used by companies and government agencies given their high price, PCWorld reports. From the article: One set of hard-coded credentials is in the Web interface and allows a remote attacker to send requests that would enable the Telnet service on the camera, the SEC Consult researchers said in an advisory Tuesday. The second hard-coded password is for the root account that could be used to take full control of the camera over Telnet. The researchers established that the password is static based on its cryptographic hash and, while they haven't actually cracked it, they believe it's only a matter of time until someone does. Sony released a patch to the affected camera models last week.

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