GasBuddy Has a New Privacy Policy (Spoiler: Not As Customer Friendly)

Slashdot - Sat, 01/08/2015 - 12:54am
An anonymous reader writes: GasBuddy has been a popular iOS and Android app for the last 5 years used to find the cheapest place to get gas. According to the Google Play store, there are over 10 million installs (in additions to the installs from Apple and Amazon's appstores). Now that they have a large enough number of users, GasBuddy has updated their privacy policy to allow them to collect more information. Some highlights of the privacy policy changes include: only 10 days for new terms to take effect (previously users were given 30 days to review the changes); collection of "signal strength related to Wifi or Bluetooth functionality, temperature, battery level, and similar technical data"; and [a warning that the company] will not honor a web browser's "do not track" setting.

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Categories: Science

GoPro Spherical Gives You Eyes All Over

Wired News - Sat, 01/08/2015 - 12:46am

Look around---there's video everywhere.

The post GoPro Spherical Gives You Eyes All Over appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Questioning the Dispute Over Key Escrow

Slashdot - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 11:38pm
Nicola Hahn writes: The topic of key escrow encryption has once again taken center stage as former Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff has spoken out against key escrow both at this year's Aspen Security Forum and in an op-ed published recently by the Washington Post. However, the debate over cryptographic back doors has a glaring blind spot. As the trove of leaks from Hacking Team highlights, most back doors are implemented using zero-day exploits. Keep in mind that the Snowden documents reveal cooperation across the tech industry, on behalf of the NSA, to make products that were "exploitable." Hence, there are people who suggest the whole discussion over key escrow includes an element of theater. Is it, among other things, a public relations gambit, in the wake of the PRISM scandal, intended to cast Silicon Valley companies as defenders of privacy?

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Categories: Science

Tor Project Pilots Exit Nodes In Libraries

Slashdot - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:56pm
An anonymous reader writes: The Tor Project has announced a new initiative to open exit relays in public libraries. "This is an idea whose time has come; libraries are our most democratic public spaces, protecting our intellectual freedom, privacy, and unfettered access to information, and Tor Project creates software that allows all people to have these rights on the internet." They point out that this is both an excellent way to educate people on the value of private internet browsing while also being a practical way to expand the Tor network. A test for this initiative is underway at the Kilton Library in Lebanon, New Hampshire, which already has a computing environment full of GNU/Linux machines.

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Categories: Science

Yahoo Snags Social Commerce Site Polyvore

Wired News - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:44pm

Yahoo’s acquisition of Polyvore points to an expansion of the scope of commerce via digital marketplaces.

The post Yahoo Snags Social Commerce Site Polyvore appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Is Our Universe a Fake?

Space.com - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:30pm
Could we actually be living in the Matrix? You might be surprised.
Categories: Science

Key gene found to drive kidney disease severity

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:28pm
Patients with higher levels of a key protein are at greater risk for severe kidney disease, experts report.
Categories: Science

How to encourage healthy dental habits away from home

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:28pm
School is just around the corner, which means backpacks and packed lunches await your children. One expert offers tips for parents to promote healthy dental habits while away from home.
Categories: Science

Ocean currents offer insights into MH370

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:27pm
Preliminary insights into the potential pathway of the plane wreckage that washed up on Reunion Island, thought to be from the missing MH370 flight, is provided by American researchers.
Categories: Science

Crystal clear images uncover secrets of hormone receptors

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:27pm
Scientists used atomic level images to show how the neuropeptide hormone neurotensin might activate its receptors. Their description is the first of its kind for a neuropeptide-binding G protein-coupled receptor, a class of receptors involved in a wide range of disorders and the target of many drugs.
Categories: Science

Tool helps public health agencies prioritize health risks

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:26pm
Public health agencies across the globe are challenged with preventing the spread of chronic diseases while dealing with limited funds and devastating budget cuts. Now, a researcher has applied the Public Health Index model, a tool he designed that has been adopted by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, to help the Brazilian government identify and prioritize health risks affecting its population.
Categories: Science

Gout medications might be useful in treating alcohol-induced liver disease

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:26pm
Two commonly used gout medications, which target uric acid and adenosine triphosphate, may offer protection from alcohol-induced liver disease and inflammation, new research suggests. These findings suggest that clinical trials in humans with alcoholic liver disease should be considered.
Categories: Science

Half of the most popular news on Twitter is not covered by traditional news media sources

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:26pm
Half of the news that appears on Twitter as 'trending topics' goes unmentioned in the traditional news media, and when both sources carry it, 60 percent of the stories appear first on the social network. Those are some of the conclusions of a study which analyzes the dissemination of news on Twitter compared with the traditional media.
Categories: Science

How bees naturally vaccinate their babies

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:26pm
When it comes to vaccinating their babies, bees don't have a choice -- they naturally immunize their offspring against specific diseases found in their environments. Now for the first time, scientists have discovered how they do it. This opens the door for researchers to develop the first-ever vaccine for insects. This is particularly important for bees since they help keep fruit, nuts and vegetables in our diets and have been declining in numbers for six decades.
Categories: Science

Agrarian settlements drive severe tropical deforestation across the Amazon

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:26pm
Resettlement projects in the Amazon are driving severe tropical deforestation, according to new research. Widely hailed as a socially responsible and 'innocuous' strategy of land redistribution, agrarian reform settlements have been created throughout the Brazilian Amazon since the early 1970s at an unprecedented scale. But a new study reveals that these farmer resettlement projects are far from environmentally friendly or socio-economically beneficial.
Categories: Science

Critical BIND Denial-of-Service Flaw Could Take Down DNS Servers

Slashdot - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 10:14pm
alphadogg writes: Attackers could exploit a new vulnerability in BIND, the most popular Domain Name System (DNS) server software, to disrupt the Internet for many users. The vulnerability affects all versions of BIND 9, from BIND 9.1.0 to BIND 9.10.2-P2, and can be exploited to crash DNS servers that are powered by the software. The vulnerability announced and patched by the Internet Systems Consortium is critical because it can be used to crash both authoritative and recursive DNS servers with a single packet.

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Categories: Science

Show Your Support For Cecil The Lion… With a $2,500 Phone?

Wired News - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 9:36pm

It's the hip new way to say you care.

The post Show Your Support For Cecil The Lion… With a $2,500 Phone? appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Urthecast Brings You Earth Images and Videos from the ISS (Video)

Slashdot - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 9:31pm
Most of us probably won't ever visit the International Space Station (ISS) and look down at the Earth (motto: "The only planet we know has beer, so let's not ruin it"). Looking at pictures and videos made by cameras mounted on the ISS is about as close as we're going to get. There's already an ISS HD Earth Viewing Experiment on Ustream, but Urthecast is putting out higher-definition images than what you see on Ustream, and has plans to put out even clearer images and video before long. While Urthecast is likely to accumulate plenty of "oohs" and "aahhs" as it rolls along, according to CEO Scott Larson their real objective is to sell imagery -- and not necessarily just from the visible light band of the overall spectrum -- to industrial and government users. People like us are still invited to look at (and marvel at) lovely images of our planetary home. NOTE: Today's video is about 4:30 long. If you want to watch and listen to more of Mr. Larson, we have a second "bonus" (Flash) video for you. Or you can read the transcript, which covers both videos.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

16-Year-Old's DNA Experiment Will Fly in Space

Space.com - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 9:29pm
A 16-year-old New York City-area student will one day see her DNA experiment launched to the International Space Station. The experiment was designed by Anna-Sophia Boguraev of Bedford, New York.
Categories: Science

Ebola vaccine found 100% effective in initial trial

Kurzweil AI - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 9:19pm

The Ebola vaccine being prepared for injection (credit: WHO/S. Hawkey)

An Ebola vaccine known as VSV-EBOV, provided by Merck, Sharp & Dohme, has shown 100% efficacy in individuals, according to results from an interim analysis published (open access) today (July 31) in the British journal The Lancet.

“This is an extremely promising development,” said Margaret Chan, M.D., Director-General of the World Health Organization. “The credit goes to the Guinean Government, the people living in the communities and our partners in this project. An effective vaccine will be another very important tool for both current and future Ebola outbreaks.”

An independent body of international experts — the Data and Safety Monitoring Board — conducted the review.

Based on the results, the Guinean national regulatory authority and ethics review committee have approved continuation of the trial to acquire conclusive evidence for the vaccine’s capacity to protect populations through what is called “herd immunity.”

“The ‘ring’ vaccination method adopted for the vaccine trial is based on the smallpox eradication strategy,” said John-Arne Røttingen, Director of the Division of Infectious Disease Control at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and Chair of the Study Steering Group.

“The premise is that by vaccinating all people who have come into contact with an infected person you create a protective ‘ring’ and stop the virus from spreading further. This strategy has helped us to follow the dispersed epidemic in Guinea, and will provide a way to continue this as a public health intervention in trial mode.”

“This record-breaking work marks a turning point in the history of health R&D,” said Assistant Director-General Marie-Paule Kieny, who leads the Ebola Research and Development effort at WHO. “We now know that the urgency of saving lives can accelerate R&D. We will harness this positive experience to develop a global R&D preparedness framework so that if another major disease outbreak ever happens again, for any disease, the world can act quickly and efficiently to develop and use medical tools and prevent a large-scale tragedy.”

VSV-EBOV was developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Categories: Science