Hints of Salty Water on Mars Raises Planetary Protection Concerns

Space.com - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 6:05pm
Orbiting spacecraft of Mars have imaged over the past several years dark, finger-like features – now called 'recurring slope lineae' - or RSL for Martian short-hand. These dark flows have been observed at low and middle latitudes on Mars.
Categories: Science

Prospects and Limits For the LHC's Capabilities To Test String Theory

Slashdot - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 6:00pm
StartsWithABang writes: The Large Hadron Collider has just been upgraded, and is now making the highest energy collisions of any human-made machine ever. But even at 13 TeV, what are the prospects for testing String Theory, considering that the string energy scale should be up at around 10^19 GeV or so? Surprisingly, there are a number of phenomenological consequences that should emerge, and looking at what we've seen so far, they may disfavor String Theory after all.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Dying Star May Have Torn Alien Planet Apart (Video)

Space.com - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:44pm
Scientists using several telescopes, including NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, found evidence that a planet in an ancient cluster of stars on the edge of the Milky Way drifted too close to a white dwarf star and was ripped apart.
Categories: Science

Congressional action needed to optimize regulation of genomic tests

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:40pm
Latest generation genomic testing offers a chance for improvements in patient care, disease prevention and healthcare cost-effectiveness. A new report recommends that Congress incentivize development of massive data systems that doctors and regulators will need to make these tests safe and effective for patients. Existing regulatory oversight should be bolstered with ongoing postmarket data collection to study tests after they are in use and resolve lingering questions about health impacts of as-yet-poorly-understood genetic variants, experts argue.
Categories: Science

Scientists one step closer to mimicking gamma-ray bursts

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:40pm
Using ever more energetic lasers, researchers have produced a record high number of electron-positron pairs, opening exciting opportunities to study extreme astrophysical processes, such as black holes and gamma-ray bursts.
Categories: Science

Brain signals contain the code for your next move

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:40pm
Is it possible to tap into the signalling in the brain to figure out what you will choose to do next? Researchers can now say yes, and have published a description of how this happens.
Categories: Science

Study could explain why ovarian cancer treatments fail

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:40pm
Ovarian cancer cells can lock into survival mode and avoid being destroyed by chemotherapy, an international study reports. The research used whole genome sequencing to analyse tumor DNA samples from 91 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC).
Categories: Science

New human ancestor species from Ethiopia lived alongside Lucy's species

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:40pm
A new relative joins 'Lucy' on the human family tree. Scientists have discovered a 3.3 to 3.5 million-year-old new human ancestor species. Upper and lower jaw fossils recovered from the Woranso-Mille area of the Afar region of Ethiopia have been assigned to the new species Australopithecus deyiremeda. This hominin lived alongside the famous 'Lucy's' species, Australopithecus afarensis.
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Invisible helpers of the sea: Marine bacteria boost growth of tiny ocean algae

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:40pm
A common diatom grows faster in the presence of bacteria that release a growth hormone known to benefit plants on land. The authors of a new report showed that these bacteria exchange material with the diatoms while in turn producing auxin, a well-known hormone made by microbes living around the roots of land plants.
Categories: Science

Researchers identify origin of chromosomal oddity in some cancer cells

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:40pm
Surveys of the genomic terrain of cancer have turned up a curious phenomenon in some tumor cells: a massive rearrangement of DNA in one or a few chromosomes, thought to be produced during a single cell cycle. In a new study, scientists demonstrate how this sudden, isolated shuffling of genetic material -- known as chromothripsis -- can occur.
Categories: Science

Robots can automatically recover from damage in minutes

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:40pm
Robots will one day provide tremendous benefits to society, such as in search and rescue missions and putting out forest fires -- but not until they can learn to keep working if they become damaged. A new article shows how to make robots automatically recover from injury in less than two minutes.
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Scientists identify key to preventing secondary cancers

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:39pm
Breast cancer is a disease that commonly spreads to other areas of the body; the most common site for the disease to spread is the bone. Leading scientists have identified a possible key to preventing secondary cancers in breast cancer patients, after discovering an enzyme that enhances the spread of the disease. They also report that an existing class of drugs for osteoporosis could stop the spread of the disease.
Categories: Science

Charcot foot, a crippling diabetes complication, is increasing

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:39pm
A growing number of diabetics are being diagnosed with a debilitating foot deformity called Charcot foot. Charcot foot often confines patients to wheelchairs, and in severe cases can require amputation. But a surgical technique that involves an external fixation device enables most patients to walk normally again.
Categories: Science

Spiraling laser pulses could change the nature of graphene

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:39pm
A new study predicts that researchers could use spiraling pulses of laser light to change the nature of graphene, turning it from a metal into an insulator and giving it other peculiar properties that might be used to encode information.
Categories: Science

Global climate on verge of multi-decadal change

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:39pm
The global climate is on the verge of broad-scale change that could last for a number of decades a new study implies. The change to the new set of climatic conditions is associated with a cooling of the Atlantic, and is likely to bring drier summers in Britain and Ireland, accelerated sea-level rise along the northeast coast of the United States, and drought in the developing countries of the Sahel region.
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Shock Collision Inside Black Hole Jet

Science Daily - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:39pm
Astronomers have discovered for the first time a rear-end collision between two high-speed knots of ejected matter from a supermassive black hole. This discovery was made while piecing together a time-lapse movie of a plasma jet blasted from a supermassive black hole inside galaxy 3C 264, located 260 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Leo.
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Hack Brief: There’s a New iPhone Text Message Attack

Wired News - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:28pm

It turns out pranksters can crash an iPhone merely by texting it the exact right string of English and Arabic characters.

The post Hack Brief: There’s a New iPhone Text Message Attack appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

Slashdot - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:17pm
Nerval's Lobster writes: How much C++ do you need to know to land an entry-level job that's heavy in C++? That's a question Dice posed to several developers. While the exact topic was C++, the broader question of "How much X do you actually need to know to make money off it?" could also apply to any number of programming languages. In the case of C++, basics to know include virtual methods, virtual destructors, operator overloading, how templates work, correct syntax, the standard library, and more. Anything less, and a senior developer will likely get furious; they have a job to do, and that job isn't teaching the ins and outs of programming. With all that in mind, what's a minimum level of knowledge for a programming language for entry-level developers?

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New Star Wars Wax Exhibit Captured With Periscope

Wired News - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:10pm

WIRED sent Peter Dench to document the Madame Tussauds' Star Wars exhibit in London using the livestreaming video app Periscope.

The post New Star Wars Wax Exhibit Captured With Periscope appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

‘Deep Learning’ Will Soon Give Us Super-Smart Robots

Wired News - Wed, 27/05/2015 - 5:00pm

The new breed of AI will extend beyond the internet, pushing into devices that can operate here in the physical world.

The post ‘Deep Learning’ Will Soon Give Us Super-Smart Robots appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science