Technique simplifies creation of high-tech crystals

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 5:07pm
Highly purified crystals that split light with uncanny precision are key parts of high-powered lenses, specialized optics and, potentially, computers that manipulate light instead of electricity. But producing these crystals by current techniques, such as etching them with a precise beam of electrons, is often extremely difficult and expensive. Now, researchers have proposed a new method that could allow scientists to customize and grow these specialized materials, known as photonic crystals, with relative ease.
Categories: Science

Quantum leap in lasers brightens future for quantum computing

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 5:07pm
Scientists have devised a breakthrough laser that uses a single artificial atom to generate and emit particles of light. The laser may play a crucial role in the development of quantum computers, which are predicted to eventually outperform today's most powerful supercomputers.
Categories: Science

Clients of violence interventional advocacy program find experience supportive

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 5:07pm
Participants who received care through a Violence Intervention Advocacy Program -- an interventional program targeting the physical, mental, emotional and social needs of violently injured youths -- were less likely to retaliate for their injuries and experienced life changing behaviors through connections to caring, steady, supportive adults who helped them feel trust and hope, researchers report.
Categories: Science

How children categorize living things

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 5:06pm
"Name everything you can think of that is alive." How would a child respond to this question? Would his or her list be full of relatives, animals from movies and books, or perhaps neighborhood pets? Would the poppies blooming on the front steps make the list or the oak tree towering over the backyard? The children's responses in a recent study revealed clear convergences among distinct communities but also illuminated differences among them.
Categories: Science

Radio frequency ID tags on honey bees reveal hive dynamics

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 5:06pm
Scientists attached radio-frequency identification tags to hundreds of individual honey bees and tracked them for several weeks. The effort yielded two discoveries: Some foraging bees are much busier than others; and if those busy bees disappear, others will take their place.
Categories: Science

Understanding how neuro cells turn cancerous

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 5:06pm
New research, for the first time, brings scientists nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous. The team studied a tumor suppressor called Merlin. Their results have identified a new mechanism whereby Merlin suppresses tumors, and that the mechanism operates within the nucleus. The research team has discovered that unsuppressed tumor cells increase via a core signalling system, the hippo pathway, and they have identified the route and method by which this signalling occurs.
Categories: Science

Communication between nostril/skin microbiome bacteria can influence pathogen behavior

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 5:06pm
Scientists have made an important discovery about the molecular interactions that occur between generally benign species of Propionibacterium bacteria and the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, the cause of most 'staph' infections.
Categories: Science

Report on viruses looks beyond disease

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 5:06pm
In contrast to their negative reputation as disease causing agents, some viruses can perform crucial biological and evolutionary functions that help to shape the world we live in today, according to a new report. "Viruses participate in essential Earth processes and influence all life forms on the planet, from contributing to biogeochemical cycles, shaping the atmospheric composition, and driving major speciation events," states one researcher.
Categories: Science

Shape-Shifting Wings, From Soviet War Planes to Top Gun’s Tomcat

Wired News - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 5:02pm
Take off. Rise. Soar. Bank. Turn. Stall. Swoop. Dive. Land. For each of the different kinds of flying an airplane has to do, there’s an ideal shape and configuration for its wings. Even though bird-like flappability isn’t feasible with struts and steel, engineers since the dawn of aviation have been trying to make wings that […]






Categories: Science

Retail pricing strategies: Do consumers prefer Deep Discounts or Everyday Low Prices?

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:57pm
Sometimes finding the best bang for your buck feels like a wild goose chase. It’s hard to know which stores offer the best prices at any given time. According to a new study, when trying to maximize savings, consumers will choose retailers they believe offer the lowest prices the majority of the time. 
Categories: Science

I’ll have what he's having? How consumers make choices about new products

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:57pm
Have you found yourself at a fancy restaurant trying to impress new friends or in a foreign country and unsure of what to order? Not wanting to appear foolish, you just go along with everyone else. According to a new study, we’re more likely to copy other people’s choices when we lack social acceptance or enough information to make an informed decision.
Categories: Science

Empathy or justice: What makes consumers donate more to charity?

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:57pm
Have you ever received a request for help and wondered how deserving the recipients are of your donation? This way of thinking may seem inconsistent with your moral values, especially if you consider yourself an otherwise compassionate and empathic person. A new study suggests that moral identity decreases donations when recipients are deemed to be responsible for their plight.
Categories: Science

Why do challenging tasks make consumers believe drugs wear off faster?

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:57pm
Imagine that you have a cup of coffee and sit down to read People magazine. How long do you think the energy boost will last before you reach for another cup? Would you need more caffeine if you tried to read War and Peace? A new study finds that consumers wrongly believe that pharmacological products such as coffee and aspirin lose their effectiveness when they engage in more strenuous activities.
Categories: Science

The heart of an astronaut, five years on

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:56pm
The heart of an astronaut is a much-studied thing. Scientists have analyzed its blood flow, rhythms, atrophy and, through journal studies, even matters of the heart. But for the first time, researchers are looking at how oxidative stress and inflammation caused by the conditions of space flight affect those hearts for up to five years after astronauts fly on the International Space Station. Lessons learned may help improve cardiovascular health on Earth as well.
Categories: Science

NASA's HS3 mission spotlight: The HIRAD instrument

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:53pm
The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, known as HIRAD, will fly aboard one of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft during NASA's Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinel or HS3 mission from Wallops beginning August 26 through September 29. One of the NASA Global Hawks will cover the storm environment and the other will analyze inner-storm conditions. HIRAD will fly aboard the inner-storm Global Hawk and will be positioned at the bottom, rear section of the aircraft.
Categories: Science

NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory celebrates 15th anniversary

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:48pm
Fifteen years ago, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched into space aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Since its deployment on July 23, 1999, Chandra has helped revolutionize our understanding of the universe through its unrivaled X-ray vision.
Categories: Science

Freezing blueberries improves antioxidant availability

Science Daily - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:48pm
Blueberries pack a powerful antioxidant punch, whether eaten fresh or from the freezer, according to a researcher. Anthocyanins, a group of antioxidant compounds, are responsible for the color in blueberries, and since most of the color is in the skin, freezing the blueberries actually improves the availability of the antioxidants.
Categories: Science

Exodus Intelligence Details Zero-Day Vulnerabilities In Tails OS

Slashdot - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:10pm
New submitter I Ate A Candle (3762149) writes Tails OS, the Tor-reliant privacy-focused operating system made famous by Edward Snowden, contains a number of zero-day vulnerabilities that could be used to take control of the OS and execute code remotely. At least that's according to zero-day exploit seller Exodus Intelligence, which counts DARPA amongst its customer base. The company plans to tell the Tails team about the issues "in due time", said Aaron Portnoy, co-founder and vice president of Exodus, but it isn't giving any information on a disclosure timeline. This means users of Tails are in danger of being de-anonymised. Even version 1.1, which hit public release today (22 July 2014), is affected. Snowden famously used Tails to manage the NSA files. The OS can be held on a USB stick and leaves no trace once removed from the drive. It uses the Tor network to avoid identification of the user, but such protections may be undone by the zero-day exploits Exodus holds.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Exodus Intelligence Details Zero-Day Vulnerabilities In Tails OS

Slashdot - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:10pm
New submitter I Ate A Candle (3762149) writes Tails OS, the Tor-reliant privacy-focused operating system made famous by Edward Snowden, contains a number of zero-day vulnerabilities that could be used to take control of the OS and execute code remotely. At least that's according to zero-day exploit seller Exodus Intelligence, which counts DARPA amongst its customer base. The company plans to tell the Tails team about the issues "in due time", said Aaron Portnoy, co-founder and vice president of Exodus, but it isn't giving any information on a disclosure timeline. This means users of Tails are in danger of being de-anonymised. Even version 1.1, which hit public release today (22 July 2014), is affected. Snowden famously used Tails to manage the NSA files. The OS can be held on a USB stick and leaves no trace once removed from the drive. It uses the Tor network to avoid identification of the user, but such protections may be undone by the zero-day exploits Exodus holds.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Exodus Intelligence Details Zero-Day Vulnerabilities In Tails OS

Slashdot - Tue, 22/07/2014 - 4:10pm
New submitter I Ate A Candle (3762149) writes Tails OS, the Tor-reliant privacy-focused operating system made famous by Edward Snowden, contains a number of zero-day vulnerabilities that could be used to take control of the OS and execute code remotely. At least that's according to zero-day exploit seller Exodus Intelligence, which counts DARPA amongst its customer base. The company plans to tell the Tails team about the issues "in due time", said Aaron Portnoy, co-founder and vice president of Exodus, but it isn't giving any information on a disclosure timeline. This means users of Tails are in danger of being de-anonymised. Even version 1.1, which hit public release today (22 July 2014), is affected. Snowden famously used Tails to manage the NSA files. The OS can be held on a USB stick and leaves no trace once removed from the drive. It uses the Tor network to avoid identification of the user, but such protections may be undone by the zero-day exploits Exodus holds.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science