Investigating how 'chemo brain' develops in cancer patients

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 4:12pm
During and after chemotherapy, many cancer patients describe feeling a mental fog, a condition that has been dubbed 'chemo brain.' Why this happens is unclear, but researchers have found a new clue to understanding this syndrome. A new study reports that chemotherapy in rats affects their chemical messengers dopamine and serotonin, which are associated with cognition.
Categories: Science

Many unknown chemicals in the Baltic Sea

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 4:12pm
New chemicals are often not recognized in analyses of fish in the Baltic Sea, shows a new study. The reason is that one chooses to search for chemicals that are already known, and much of those who are already regulated by law. Many toxic chemicals that are not yet regulated are often overlooked in the environmental monitoring.
Categories: Science

What can Pavlov's dogs tell us about drinking?

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 4:12pm
Pavlovian cues that predict alcohol can lead us toward addiction. And sometimes those cues can become desirable in and of themselves, as shown in a new study.
Categories: Science

No dessert for you! When it comes to diabetes, 'nagging is caring'

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 4:12pm
For men, an unhappy marriage may actually slow the development of diabetes and promote successful treatment once they do get the disease, finds an American study.
Categories: Science

Monitoring sun exposure with a portable paper sensor

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 4:11pm
Summer is around the corner -- time for cookouts and sunbathing. But too much sun can result in sunburn, which is the main cause of skin cancer. Because the time it takes to get burned depends on many factors, it is not easy to tell when to seek shade. To help people stay safe, researchers report the development of a paper-based sensor for monitoring sun exposure given different skin tones and sunscreen levels.
Categories: Science

Jam Band 'Moe.' Celebrate 'Star Wars', Poke Fun At Lucas | Video

Space.com - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 4:11pm
For over 25 years, one of the hardest working bands in the music business have traveled the globe to perform epic three-hour performances for their fans. On Halloween in 2015, they took them to the 'galaxy far, far, away' for the first time.
Categories: Science

Osmo Turns Blocks Into Code to Teach Kids Programming

Wired News - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 4:00pm
Osmo's latest iPad game lets kids use modular, magnetic blocks to create sets of executable instructions. The post Osmo Turns Blocks Into Code to Teach Kids Programming appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Foxconn Cuts 60,000 Jobs, Replaces With Robots

Slashdot - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:50pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a bid to accelerate growth and reduce labor costs, Apple supplier Foxconn cut 60,000 jobs at a single factory, work that is now being completed by robots. As many as 600 companies in the Chinese manufacturing hub of Kunshan may have similar plans to automate their workforce, according to a government survey. Foxconn spokesperson Xu Yulian said, "The Foxconn factory has reduced its employee strength from 110,000 to 50,000, thanks to the introduction of robots. It has tasted success in reduction of labor costs." He added, "More companies are likely to follow suit." These changes are spurred in part by a desire to reduce labor costs, but have also been made in response to an explosion at a Kunshan factory in 2014 that killed 146 people. The explosion was attributed to unsafe working conditions in the Taiwanese-owned metal polishing factory, which were recognized and documented. After the explosion, the local government pledged 2 billion yuan per year in subsidies to support companies that install industrial robots on their production lines.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Spring comes sooner to urban heat islands, with potential consequences for wildlife

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:41pm
With spring now fully sprung, a new study shows that buds burst earlier in dense urban areas than in their suburban and rural surroundings. This may be music to urban gardeners' ears, but that tune could be alarming to some native and migratory birds and bugs.
Categories: Science

Students design prosthetic foot for high heels

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:41pm
After losing a leg to injury or disease, women adjusting to life with a prosthetic limb face the same challenges as men, with perhaps one added complication: how to wear high-heels? Students have developed an early version of a potential solution.
Categories: Science

Fixing cystic fibrosis: In vitro studies show therapeutically robust correction of the most common CF gene mutation

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:41pm
In experiments with isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells, researchers have partially restored the lost function of those cells to therapeutic levels.
Categories: Science

Study examines suicide attempt risk factors, methods and timing, related to deployment among active duty soldiers

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:41pm
Suicide attempts, like suicides, have increased in the U.S. Army over the last decade. To better understand and prevent suicidal behavior, researchers examined timing and risk factors for suicide attempts among U.S. Army enlisted Soldiers. They found the highest risk was among those who never deployed, and those who never deployed were at greatest risk during their second month of service.
Categories: Science

Antiretroviral therapy may not be enough to reduce HIV-associated arterial inflammation

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:39pm
Initiating antiretroviral therapy soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients.
Categories: Science

Study finds elevated cancer risk among women with new-onset atrial fibrillation

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:39pm
Among nearly 35,000 initially healthy women who were followed-up for about 20 years, those with new-onset atrial fibrillation had an increased risk of cancer, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

'Star Wars' Jams - 'Moe.' Takes Audience To Galaxy Far, Far, Away - Gallery

Space.com - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:23pm
The jam Band Moe. delivered a Star Wars-themed set, with costumes props and all to a sold-out crowd at the Pilmore in Philadephia, PA on Oct. 31st. 2015.
Categories: Science

Scientists explore new concepts of plant behavior, interactions

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
While a lot is already known about plant perception, our ecological understanding of plants has largely focused on seeing plants as the sum of a series of building blocks or traits. A new collection of articles gathers researchers who have taken a different approach, theorizing plant activity in terms of behavior.
Categories: Science

Thermal modification of wood and a complex study of its properties by magnetic resonance

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
Researchers conducted an investigation of various thermally treated wood species from the Central European part of Russia by magnetic resonance methods and revealed important changes in wood structure which were not available for observation by other methods.
Categories: Science

Australian cricket team uses guided missile technology to improve bowling

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
Researchers have developed a revolutionary algorithm using submarine and guided missile technology to reduce injury and improve performance in cricket fast bowlers. The 'torpedo technology' is being used by the Australian team in preparations for the upcoming Sri Lanka Series. Sports scientists developed the algorithm as the current manual reporting of professional cricketers' workloads -- which only measures how many deliveries a bowler balls, and not the intensity of the effort -- was inadequate.
Categories: Science

Could optical clocks redefine the length of a second?

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
GPS-based navigation, communication systems, electrical power grids and financial networks all rely on the precise time kept by a network of around 500 atomic clocks located around the world. Researchers now present a way to use optical clocks for more accurate timekeeping than is possible with today's system of traditional atomic clocks. The researchers also measured an optical clock's frequency -- analogous to it's 'ticking' -- with unprecedented precision.
Categories: Science

Lung function may affect vocal health for women

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
Vocal fatigue is a common complaint among teachers and one of the most debilitating conditions that can lead to vocal damage. The typical symptoms include hoarseness, vocal tiredness, muscle pains and lost or cracked notes. However, the actual physiological mechanism of vocal fatigue is still being explored. Now, a group of researchers have found a potential link between pulmonary function and the symptoms of voice fatigue unique to women, the predominate population of teaching workforce.
Categories: Science