US Unveils Charges Against KickassTorrents, Names Two More Defendants

Slashdot - Fri, 26/08/2016 - 12:45am
A total of three men are said to be operators of file-sharing site KickassTorrents (KAT), according to U.S. prosecutors. Last month, federal authorities arrested the 30-year-old Ukrainian mastermind of KAT, Artem Vaulin, and formally charged him with one count of conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement, one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, and two counts of criminal copyright infringement. Two other Ukrainians were named in the new indictment (PDF): Levgen (Eugene) Kutsenko and Oleksander (Alex) Radostin. While only Vaulin has been arrested, bench warrants have been issue for the arrest of all three men. Ars Technica reports: "Prosecutors say the three men developed and maintained the site together and used it to 'generate millions of dollars from the unlawful distribution of copyright-protected media, including movies, [...] television shows, music, video games, computer software, and electronic books.' They gave out 'Reputation' and 'User Achievement' awards to users who uploaded the most popular files, including a special award for users who had uploaded more than 1,000 torrents. The indictment presents a selection of the evidence that the government intends to use to convict the men, and it isn't just simple downloads of the copyrighted movies. The government combed through Vaulin's e-mails and traced the bitcoins that were given to him via a 'donation' button."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Apple Patenting a Way To Collect Fingerprints, Photos of Thieves

Slashdot - Fri, 26/08/2016 - 12:05am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Apple Insider: As published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Apple's invention covering "Biometric capture for unauthorized user identification" details the simple but brilliant -- and legally fuzzy -- idea of using an iPhone or iPad's Touch ID module, camera and other sensors to capture and store information about a potential thief. Apple's patent is also governed by device triggers, though different constraints might be applied to unauthorized user data aggregation. For example, in one embodiment a single failed authentication triggers the immediate capture of fingerprint data and a picture of the user. In other cases, the device might be configured to evaluate the factors that ultimately trigger biometric capture based on a set of defaults defined by internal security protocols or the user. Interestingly, the patent application mentions machine learning as a potential solution for deciding when to capture biometric data and how to manage it. Other data can augment the biometric information, for example time stamps, device location, speed, air pressure, audio data and more, all collected and logged as background operations. The deemed unauthorized user's data is then either stored locally on the device or sent to a remote server for further evaluation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

PSA: PlayStation Network Gets Two-Step Verification

Slashdot - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 11:20pm
Consider this a public service announcement: Sony has (finally) added two-factor authentication to PlayStation Network accounts. If you're a PlayStation user and are reading this right now, you really should go set it up so that someone doesn't try to take over your account and steal your password. Ars Technica details how you can set up the new security features: "Turn on your PS4 and go to Settings -> PlayStation Network Account Management -> Account Information -> Security -> 2-Step Verification. You can also set it up through the web by logging into your PSN account on the web and going through the Security tab under the Account header. From there, on-screen instructions will walk you through the process of using a text message to confirm your mobile device as a secondary layer of security for your PSN account. Two-factor support is not available when logging on to older PlayStation systems, so Sony recommends you generate a 'device setup password' to help protect the PS3, Vita, or PSP." Two-factor authentication comes five years after hackers breached PSN's security and stole 77 million accounts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Alt-Right’s Dark Army of Racist Trolls Just Had a Great Day

Wired News - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 10:41pm
The alt-right is just a way for people to pretend they aren't white supremacists. After today, they are mainstream. The post The Alt-Right’s Dark Army of Racist Trolls Just Had a Great Day appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

FCC Proposes 5G Cybersecurity Requirements, Asks For Industry Advice

Slashdot - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 10:40pm
Presto Vivace quotes a report from FedScoop: "Cybersecurity issues must be addressed during the design phase for the entire 5G ecosystem, including devices. This will place a premium on collaboration among all stakeholders," said FCC chairman Tom Wheeler during a National Press Club event on June 20. "We continue to prefer an approach that emphasizes that industry develop cybersecurity standards just as we have done in wired networks." The FCC published a request Wednesday for comment on a new set of proposed 5G rules to the Federal Register focused on adding specific "performance requirements" for developers of example internet-connected devices. If a company hopes to secure a license to access higher-frequency 5G spectrum in the future then they will need to adhere to these specific requirements -- in other words, compliance is non-negotiable. Notably, these FCC "performance requirements" now include the submission of a network security plan. The report adds: "A quick review of the FCC's proposed 5G cybersecurity plan shows a six category split, organized by a companies' security approach, coordination efforts, standards and best practices, participation with standards bodies, other security approaches and plans with information sharing organizations. Security plans must be submitted to the commission at least six months before a 5G-ready product enters the market, according to the notice."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Facebook Gives Away Machine Vision Tools of the Future

Wired News - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 10:03pm
Facebook wants to teach computers to see, so it's giving away its AI research for free. The post Facebook Gives Away Machine Vision Tools of the Future appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Princeton Researchers Announce Open Source 25-Core Processor

Slashdot - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 10:00pm
An anonymous reader writes: Researchers at Princeton announced at Hot Chips this week their 25-core Piton Processor. The processor was designed specifically to increase data center efficiency with novel architecture features enabling over 8,000 of these processors to be connected together to build a system with over 200,000 cores. Fabricated on IBM's 32nm process and with over 460 million transistors, Piton is one of the largest and most complex academic processors every built. The Princeton team has opened their design up and released all of the chip source code, tests, and infrastructure as open source in the OpenPiton project, enabling others to build scalable, manycore processors with potentially thousands of cores.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Song Exploder: The Guy Behind Silicon Valley’s Theme Still Records on Cassette

Wired News - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:30pm
In the latest 'Song Exploder' podcast Tom Fec (aka Tobacco), who composed the theme for HBO's 'Silicon Valley,' breaks down a track from his fourth album. The post Song Exploder: The Guy Behind Silicon Valley's Theme Still Records on Cassette appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Public health researchers develop model to predict Sudden Cardiac Death

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:24pm
Researchers have developed a sudden cardiac death (SCD) predictive model that can help identify and prevent the disease in individuals at high risk.
Categories: Science

Designing ultrasound tools with Lego-like proteins

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:23pm
Ultrasound imaging is used around the world to help visualize developing babies and diagnose diseases. Sound waves bounce off the tissues, revealing their different densities and shapes. The next step in ultrasound technology is to image not just anatomy, but specific cells and molecules deeper in the body, such as those associated with tumors or bacteria in our gut. Now scientists say that [rotein engineering techniques might one day lead to colorful ultrasound images of cells deep within our bodies.
Categories: Science

Neuroscientists stand up for basic cell biology research

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:23pm
Clinical trials and translational medicine have certainly given people hope and rapid pathways to cures for some of humankind's most troublesome diseases, but now is not the time to overlook the power of basic research, says a neuroscientist.
Categories: Science

Symmetry crucial for building key biomaterial collagen in the lab

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:23pm
Functional human collagen has been impossible to create in the lab. Now, a team of researchers describes what may be the key to growing functional, natural collagen fibers outside of the body: symmetry.
Categories: Science

In sub-Saharan Africa, cancer can be an infectious disease

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:23pm
In a new report, a researcher shows that mothers who contract malaria during pregnancy may have children with increased risk of Burkitt's lymphoma.
Categories: Science

Fused genes found in esophageal cancer cells offer new clues on disease mechanisms

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:23pm
Scientists have characterized structurally abnormal genes in esophageal adenocarcinoma, the findings of which could pave way for developing new biomarkers in this fatal disease, they say.
Categories: Science

Solving a 48 year old mystery: Scientists grow noroviruses in human intestinal cell cultures

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:22pm
For the first time, scientists have grown human noroviruses, the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea worldwide, in human intestinal cell cultures in the lab.
Categories: Science

How to Stop WhatsApp From Giving Facebook Your Phone Number

Wired News - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:21pm
You may never have read a terms and conditions update before, but you'll want to this time. The post How to Stop WhatsApp From Giving Facebook Your Phone Number appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Google Fiber To Cut Staff In Half After User Totals Disappoint, Says Report

Slashdot - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 9:20pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from DSLReports: Sources claim that Google Fiber has been disappointed with the company's overall number of total subscribers since launching five years ago. A paywalled report over at The Information cites a variety of anonymous current and former Google employees, who say the estimated 200,000 or so broadband subscribers the company had managed to sign up by the end of 2014 was a fary cry from the company's original projection of somewhere closer to 5 million. Google Fiber has never revealed its total number of subscribers. A report last October pegged the company's total broadband subscribers at somewhere around 120,000, though it's unclear how many of those users had signed up for Google Fiber's symmetrical 5 Mbps tier, which was originally free after users paid a $300 installation fee. Disappointed by sluggish subscriber tallies, The Information report states that last month Alphabet CEO Larry Page ordered Google Fiber boss Craig Barratt to cut the total Google Fiber staff in half to roughly 500 people. That's a claim that's sure to only fuel continued speculation that the company is starting to get cold feet about its attempts to bring broadband competition to a broken duopoly market.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

WIRED Book Club: Too Like the Lightning Is Teasing Us, and We Love It

Wired News - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 8:55pm
Even the grumpiest among us are won over by the book's breathtaking final act---despite it leaving us hanging. The post WIRED Book Club: Too Like the Lightning Is Teasing Us, and We Love It appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Italy Quake Rescuers Ask Locals To Unlock Their Wi-Fi

Slashdot - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 8:40pm
Rescue teams searching for earthquake survivors in central Italy have asked locals to unlock their Wifi passwords. The Italian Red Cross says residents' home networks can assist with communications during the search for survivors, reports BBC. From the report: On Wednesday a 6.2 magnitude earthquake struck central Italy and killed more than 240 people. More than 4,300 rescuers are looking for survivors believed to still be trapped in the rubble. On Twitter, the Italian Red Cross posted a step-by-step guide which explains how local residents can switch off their Wifi network encryption. Similar requests have been made by the National Geological Association and Lazio Region. A security expert has warned that removing encryption from a home Wifi network carries its own risks, but added that those concerns are trivial in the context of the rescue operation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Want to Hang Out with POTUS in VR? You Can!

Wired News - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 8:30pm
A new virtual reality experience from Felix & Paul Studios lets you visit Yosemite National Park with President Obama. Check it out here. The post Want to Hang Out with POTUS in VR? You Can! appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science