Lifestyle factors associated with less heart failure after 65

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 7:48pm
Adults who walked briskly, were moderately active in their leisure time, drank moderately, didn't smoke and avoided obesity had half the risk of heart failure as adults who did not optimize these modifiable risk factors, according to a study that followed nearly 4,500 adults for two decades.
Categories: Science

Hypertension, high cholesterol, other heart disease risk factors increasing In Asia

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 7:48pm
The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes have been decreasing in the United States and Europe, however they appear to be on the rise in Asia, particularly Japan, according to a new article.
Categories: Science

The DARPA Robotics Challenge Was a Bust; Let's Try Again

Slashdot - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 7:18pm
malachiorion writes: The DARPA Robotics Challenge, the biggest and most well-funded international robotics competition in years, was a failure. After years of grueling work on the part of brilliant roboticists around the world, and millions in funding from the Pentagon, the finals came and went with little to no coverage from the mainstream media. The only takeaway, for those who aren't extremely dialed into robotics, is that a ton of robots fell down in funny ways. There were winners, but considering how downgraded the tasks were, compared to the ones initially announced in 2012, it was closer to the first DARPA Grand Challenge, where none of the robot cars finished, than the Urban Challenge, which kicked off the race to build deployable driverless cars. So just as DARPA regrouped after that first fizzle of a race, here's my argument for Popular Science: It's time to do it again, and make falling, and getting up, mandatory.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The FBI Spent $775K on Hacking Team’s Spy Tools Since 2011

Wired News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 7:00pm

After the company was hacked, details of Hacking Team's previously unknown contracts have come to light.

The post The FBI Spent $775K on Hacking Team’s Spy Tools Since 2011 appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Software Devs Leaving Greece For Good, Finance Minister Resigns

Slashdot - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 6:35pm
New submitter TheHawke writes with this story from ZDNet about the exodus of software developers from Greece. "In the last three years, almost 80 percent of my friends, mostly developers, left Greece," software developer Panagiotis Kefalidis told ZDNet. "When I left for North America, my mother was not happy, but... it is what it is." It's not just the software developers quitting either. The Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis also resigned. A portion of his resignation announcement reads: "Soon after the announcement of the referendum results, I was made aware of a certain preference by some Eurogroup participants, and assorted ‘partners’, for my ‘absence’ from its meetings; an idea that the Prime Minister judged to be potentially helpful to him in reaching an agreement. For this reason I am leaving the Ministry of Finance today."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Restraint, confinement still an everyday practice in mental health settings

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 6:32pm
Providers of mental-health services still rely on intervention techniques such as physical restraint and confinement to control some psychiatric hospital patients, a practice that can cause harm to both patients and care facilities, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Blacklegged tick populations have expanded via migration, biologists show

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 6:32pm
In a new study, biologists used genetic and phylogeographic analyses to determine the origin and recent migratory history of newly discovered tick populations in the Northeastern United States. Their findings indicate that the ticks moved into new areas from established populations, mainly through short-distance, local moves.
Categories: Science

Stress-fighting proteins could be key to new treatments for asthma

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 6:32pm
Investigators have discovered the precise molecular steps that enable immune cells implicated in certain forms of asthma and allergy to develop and survive in the body. The findings reveal a new pathway that scientists could use to develop more effective treatments and therapies for the chronic lung disorder.
Categories: Science

Link found between autoimmune diseases, medications, dangerous heartbeat condition

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 6:32pm
New research focuses on identifying the mechanism by which patients with various autoimmune and connective tissue disorders may be at risk for life-threatening cardiac events if they take certain anti-histamine or anti-depressant medications.
Categories: Science

The Week in Trailers: Aaron Sorkin Is Steve Jobs Is Michael Fassbender

Wired News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 6:30pm

This week's best trailers raise a lot of interesting questions. Watch them all here.

The post The Week in Trailers: Aaron Sorkin Is Steve Jobs Is Michael Fassbender appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Wheel Worries: Mars Rover Curiosity Dealing With Damage

Space.com - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 6:00pm
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity faces ongoing wheel wear and tear as it continues its trek across the rock-strewn Red Planet. Mission engineers are watching the wheels turn, keeping an eye on the dings and cracks that have begun to appear.
Categories: Science

Protein implicated in osteosarcoma's spread acts as air traffic controller

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 5:57pm
The investigation of a simple protein has uncovered its uniquely complicated role in the spread of the childhood cancer, osteosarcoma. It turns out the protein, called ezrin, acts like an air traffic controller, coordinating multiple functions within a cancer cell and allowing it to endure stress conditions encountered during metastasis.
Categories: Science

How to rule a gene 'galaxy': A lesson from developing neurons

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 5:57pm
A new study has found that many RNA messengers encoding neuronal proteins contain specialized sequences that can promote their destabilization in the presence of an RNA-binding protein called tristetraprolin, or TTP.
Categories: Science

Japanese and US Piloted Robots To Brawl For National Pride

Slashdot - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 5:52pm
jfruh writes: Japan may have just lost the Women's World Cup to the U.S., but the country is hoping for a comeback in another competition: a battle between giant robots. Suidobashi Heavy Industry has agreed to a challenge from Boston-based MegaBots that would involve titanic armored robots developed by each startup, the first of its kind involving piloted machines that are roughly 4 meters tall. "We can't let another country win this," Kogoro Kurata, who is CEO of Suidobashi, said in a video posted to YouTube. "Giant robots are Japanese culture."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Penny Dreadful GIF and a Graf: Werewolves Must Walk Alone

Wired News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 5:45pm

After banding together to defeat the devil, everyone went their separate ways in last night's epic season finale.

The post Penny Dreadful GIF and a Graf: Werewolves Must Walk Alone appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Is Sense8 Too Radical for Critics?

Wired News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 5:15pm

In the new 'Geek's Guide to the Galaxy' podcast the panel discusses whether or not Netflix's new sci-fi show is too diverse for some critics.

The post Is Sense8 Too Radical for Critics? appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Hannibal GIF and a Graf: Goodbye, Dumb Inspector

Wired News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 5:10pm

Inspector Pazzi has finally tracked down Hannibal. What happens next is pretty much what you would expect.

The post Hannibal GIF and a Graf: Goodbye, Dumb Inspector appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Google's Waze Jumps Into the Ride-Sharing Business

Slashdot - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 5:10pm
An anonymous reader writes: Waze, the online mapping company owned by Google, is testing a ride-sharing service in Israel called RideWith. The service will allow commuters to pay drivers for rides to and from work. This is a hard limit — drivers can give no more than two rides per day. If the restriction remains after the initial test, it could be a simple way to avoid pseudo-professional drivers, and all the taxi-related legal problems that go with them (see: Uber). "RideWith calculates a cost based on the anticipated fuel consumption and 'depreciation' based on mileage, and the driver is free to accept or decline the ride accordingly." One can't help but speculate about future involvement with Google's autonomous car project.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Big Question: How Does Sunscreen Shield Your Skin With Science?

Wired News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 4:54pm

You trust sunscreen, and it comes through. But have you ever wondered how the stuff works?

The post Big Question: How Does Sunscreen Shield Your Skin With Science? appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Uncovering the mechanism of our oldest anesthetic

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 4:37pm
Researchers have now revealed brainwave changes in patients receiving nitrous oxide, or "laughing gas." Nitrous oxide, commonly known as "laughing gas," has been used in anesthesiology practice since the 1800s, but the way it works to create altered states is has not been well understood.
Categories: Science