FCC Chairman Wants It To Be Easier To Listen To Free FM Radio On Your Smartphone

Slashdot - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 10:00pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Recode: Your smartphone has an FM radio in it, only it's unlikely that you're able to use it. That's because in the U.S., less than half of phones actually have the FM tuner turned on. But FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who just recently assumed the top position at the regulatory agency under President Trump, thinks that should change. In remarks made to the North American Broadcasters Association yesterday, Pai said that it's a public safety issue. Both the former head of the Federal Emergency Management Association and an FCC advisory panel on public safety have advocated for turning on the FM radio capabilities in smartphones, since radio is a reliable source of information when internet or cellphone networks go down in severe weather. Although Pai thinks smartphones should have the FM chip turned on, he doesn't think the government should mandate it: "As a believer in free markets and the rule of law, I cannot support a government mandate requiring activation of these chips. I don't believe the FCC has the power to issue a mandate like that, and more generally I believe it's best to sort this issue out in the marketplace."

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Categories: Science

Not Even Street Closures Can Make San Francisco Traffic Any Worse

Wired News - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 9:33pm
If you want to make a terrible thing much worse, you're gonna need a bigger slab of concrete. The post Not Even Street Closures Can Make San Francisco Traffic Any Worse appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Google Fiber Sheds Workers As It Looks to a Wireless Future

Slashdot - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 9:20pm
Mariella Moon, writing for Engadget: Alphabet is making some huge changes to steer Google Fiber in a new, more wireless direction. According to Wired, the corporation has reassigned hundreds of Fiber employees to other parts of the company and those who remained will mostly work in the field. It has also hired broadband veteran Greg McCray as the new CEO for Access, the division that runs Google Fiber. These changes don't exactly come out of left field: back in October, Google announced that it's pausing the high-speed internet's expansion to new markets and that it's firing nine percent of the service's staff. Wired says running fiber optic cables into people's homes has become too expensive for the company. A Recode report last year says it costs Mountain View $1 billion to bring Fiber to a new market.

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Categories: Science

Classy-as-Hell Dentist Offices We Wouldn’t Actually Dread Visiting

Wired News - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 9:13pm
Clinical environments are out. Warm, Scandinavian spaces are in. The post Classy-as-Hell Dentist Offices We Wouldn’t Actually Dread Visiting appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Mark Zuckerberg’s Answer to a World Divided by Facebook Is More Facebook

Wired News - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 9:00pm
Mark Zuckerberg believes his platform brings people together, despite the evidence that in connecting the world, Facebook may be helping to tear it apart. The post Mark Zuckerberg's Answer to a World Divided by Facebook Is More Facebook appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Tech Jobs Took a Big Hit Last Year

Slashdot - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 8:40pm
Barb Darrow, writing for Fortune: Tech jobs took it on the chin last year. Layoffs at computer, electronics, and telecommunications companies were up 21 percent to 96,017 jobs cut in 2016, compared to 79,315 the prior year. Tech layoffs accounted for 18 percent of the total 526,915 U.S. job cuts announced in 2016, according to Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a global outplacement firm based in Chicago. Of the 2016 total, some 66,821 of the layoffs came from computer companies, up 7% year over year. Challenger attributed much of that increase to cuts made by Dell Technologies, the entity formed by the $63 billion convergence of Dell and EMC. In preparation for that combination, layoffs were instituted across EMC and its constituent companies, including VMware.

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Categories: Science

CloudFlare Puts Pirate Sites on New IP Addresses, Avoids Cogent Blockade

Slashdot - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 8:00pm
Earlier this month, several users worldwide reported that they were unable to access pirate websites including the Pirate Bay. It was because the internet backbone network of Cogent Communications had blackholed the CloudFlare IP-address of pirate websites. Less than a week later, CloudFlare is fighting back. From a report on TorrentFreak: The Pirate Bay and dozens of other pirate sites that were blocked by Cogent's Internet backbone are now accessible again. CloudFlare appears to have moved the sites in question to a new pair of IP-addresses, effectively bypassing Cogent's blackhole. [...] As of yesterday, the sites in question have been assigned the IP-addresses 104.31.16.3 and 104.31.17.3, still grouped together. Most, if not all of the sites, are blocked by court order in the UK so this is presumably done to prevent ISP overblocking of 'regular' CloudFlare subscribers.

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Categories: Science

Zero tolerance policies unfairly punish black girls

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:40pm
Black girls are disproportionately punished in American schools -- an 'overlooked crisis' that is populating the school-to-prison pipeline at rising rates, two education scholars argue in a new paper.
Categories: Science

Geology of Ceres illuminates origin of organics

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:40pm
NASA's Dawn spacecraft recently detected organic-rich areas on Ceres. Scientists evaluated the geology of the regions to conclude that the organics are most likely native to the dwarf planet. Data from the spacecraft suggest that the interior of Ceres is the source of these organic materials, as opposed to arriving via impacting asteroids or comets, according to a new article.
Categories: Science

Glowing mice suggest new gene therapy technique

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:40pm
A collaboration between chemists and gene therapy experts produced a new way of inserting the code for modified proteins into the cells of mice. If successful in humans, the technique could be useful for vaccines or cancer therapies.
Categories: Science

International students' concept of 'home' shapes post-graduation plans

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:40pm
How international university students think about home significantly influences their migration plans upon graduation, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

HIV hijacks common cells to spread infection

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:40pm
Scientists have discovered that a common type of cell within the human reproductive and intestinal tracts assists HIV in infecting immune cells. Understanding how these cells aid HIV could lead to new methods that prevent HIV transmission.
Categories: Science

Pizza, burgers and the like: A single high-fat meal can damage the metabolism

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:39pm
The global proliferation of overweight and obese people and people with type 2 diabetes is often associated with the consumption of saturated fats. Scientists have found that even the one-off consumption of a greater amount of palm oil reduces the body's sensitivity to insulin and causes increased fat deposits as well as changes in the energy metabolism of the liver.
Categories: Science

When your eyes override your ears: New insights into the McGurk effect

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:39pm
Seeing is not always believing -- visual speech (mouth movements) mismatched with auditory speech (sounds) can result in the perception of an entirely different message. This mysterious illusion is known as the McGurk effect. Neuroscience researchers have created an algorithm to reveal key insight into why the brain can sometimes muddle up one of the most fundamental aspects of the human experience.
Categories: Science

DEET and PMD spray-on repellents most effective at repelling mosquitoes

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:39pm
In a crowded marketplace of products advertised to repel mosquitoes, consumers are wise to trust spray-on repellents containing DEET or PMD, say researchers. In a comparison study of several mosquito-repellent products, 'wearable' devices such as bracelets or sonic repellers were found to be largely ineffective in repelling Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.
Categories: Science

Scientists create novel model that shows progression from normal blood cells to leukemia

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:39pm
Researchers have created a novel model that shows the step-by-step progression from normal blood cells to leukemia and its precursor diseases, creating replicas of the stages of the disease to test the efficacy of therapeutic interventions at each stage, according to a study. This research marked the first time scientists have been able to transplant leukemia from humans to a test tube and then into mice for study.
Categories: Science

Underwater seagrass beds dial back polluted seawater

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:39pm
Seagrass meadows -- bountiful underwater gardens that nestle close to shore and are the most common coastal ecosystem on Earth -- can reduce bacterial exposure for corals, other sea creatures and humans, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Rainbow dyes add greater precision to fight against 'superbugs'

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:39pm
A study reveals the operation of the biochemical clockwork that drives cellular division in bacteria in extreme detail. It is s an important step forward in research on bacterial growth and could inform efforts to develop drugs that combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
Categories: Science

Moths' sweet way of compensating for lack of antioxidants

Science Daily - Thu, 16/02/2017 - 7:39pm
Animals that feed almost solely on nectar, which doesn't produce protective antioxidants, are still able to avoid experiencing oxidative damage to their muscles through a clever adaption that involves converting carbohydrates into antioxidants, a new study reveals.
Categories: Science