New brain death pathway in Alzheimer's disease

Science Daily - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 5:30pm
Neuroscientists have identified a new way for brain cells to become fated to die during Alzheimer's diseases. The research team has found the first evidence that the activation of a biological pathway called necroptosis, which causes neuronal loss, is closely linked with Alzheimer's severity, cognitive decline and extreme loss of tissue and brain weight that are all advanced hallmarks of the disease.
Categories: Science

Challenging prevailing theory about how deep-sea vents are colonized

Science Daily - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 5:30pm
Despite being relatively close together, two recently discovered hydrothermal vent fields in the Gulf of California host very different animal communities. This finding contradicts a common scientific assumption that neighboring vents will share similar animal communities, and suggests that local geology and vent-fluid chemistry are important factors affecting vent communities.
Categories: Science

Mysterious Mac Malware Has Infected Hundreds of Victims For Years

Slashdot - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 5:20pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: A mysterious piece of malware has been infecting hundreds of Mac computers for years -- and no one noticed until a few months ago. The malware is called "FruitFly," and one of its variants, "FruitFly 2" has infected at least 400 victims over the years. FruitFly 2 is intriguing and mysterious: its goals, who's behind it, and how it infects victims, are all unknown. Earlier this year, an ex-NSA hacker started looking into a piece of malware he described to me as "unique" and "intriguing." It was a slightly different strain of a malware discovered on four computers earlier this year by security firm Malwarebytes, known as "FruitFly." This first strain had researchers scratching their heads. On the surface, the malware seemed "simplistic." It was programmed mainly to surreptitiously monitor victims through their webcams, capture their screens, and log keystrokes. But, strangely, it went undetected since at least 2015. There was no indication of who could be behind it, and it contained "ancient" functions and "rudimentary" remote control capabilities, Malwarebytes's Thomas Reed wrote at the time.

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Categories: Science

ShieldFS Is a Clever New Tool That Shuts Down Ransomware Before It's Too Late

Wired News - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 5:12pm
By sniffing out ransomware in real-time, ShieldFS might be the cure to the internet's latest security scourge.
Categories: Science

We Know How 'Valerian' Got Made—But Not Why It Failed

Wired News - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 5:12pm
Luc Besson's newest seems like a critical and commercial dud. But that's how his other movies started out too.
Categories: Science

Pittsburgh Gets a Tech Makeover

Slashdot - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 4:45pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: In 2015, Monocle magazine, a favorite read of the global hipsterati, published an enthusiastic report on Lawrenceville, the former blue-collar neighborhood here filled with cafes, hyped restaurants and brick rowhouses being renovated by flippers. Last year, in a much-publicized development, Uber began testing self-driving cars on the streets, putting this city at the forefront of the autonomous-vehicle revolution. Also last year, in a less publicized development, Jean Yang, 30, returned to this city after more than a decade of living in Boston, finding a Pittsburgh she hardly recognized from her 1990s childhood. And four months ago, Caesar Wirth, a 28-year-old software engineer, moved from Tokyo to work for a local tech start-up, Duolingo. These seemingly unrelated events have one thing in common: Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science. Much has been made of the "food boom" in Pittsburgh, and the city has long had a thriving arts scene. But perhaps the secret, underlying driver for both the economy and the cool factor -- the reason Pittsburgh now gets mentioned alongside Brooklyn and Portland, Ore., as an urban hot spot for millennials -- isn't chefs or artists but geeks. In a 2014 article in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Mayor Bill Peduto compared Carnegie Mellon, along with the University of Pittsburgh, to the iron ore factories that made this city an industrial power in the 19th century. The schools are the local resource "churning out that talent" from which the city is fueled. Because of the top students and research professors at Carnegie Mellon, tech companies like Apple, Facebook, Google and Uber have opened offices here. The big tech firms, along with their highly skilled, highly paid workers, have made Pittsburgh younger and more international and helped to transform once-derelict neighborhoods like Lawrenceville and East Liberty. Indeed, East Liberty has become something of a tech hub, said Luis von Ahn, the co-founder and chief executive of Duolingo, a language-learning platform company with its headquarters in that neighborhood. Google Pittsburgh, with its more than 500 employees, also has part of its offices in East Liberty, as does AlphaLab, a start-up accelerator.

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Categories: Science

Uber Takes Inspiration From Its Indian Rival, Plans To Introduce an Infotainment System in Its Cars In the Country

Slashdot - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 4:20pm
Reader manishs writes: Uber is taking a page out of Ola's playbook as it pushes to expand business in India, its largest overseas market. Months after its Indian rival introduced its 'connected platform' called Ola Play, Uber is set to launch its own infotainment system across several of its cab tiers in the country, people familiar with the matter have told Gadgets 360. The company began testing its infotainment system -- an Android tablet that comes loaded with a range of services -- in select cities in the country earlier this year. The ride-hailing service now plans to install the tablet on several of its premium cabs including its Uber X fleet, and make it available for passengers in select circles later this year, people said. Uber has been inviting select drivers in New Delhi and other cities to install an HD screen-enabled tablet, according to a source and two drivers who spoke on the condition of anonymity. This is the first time Uber is planning to bring an actual tablet to its cabs in any of the markets where it operates. The company currently offers Uber Trip Experiences in select markets where it lets passengers consume a range of services using their own phone.

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Categories: Science

DNS Lib Underscore Bug Bites Everyone's Favorite Init Tool, Blanks Netflix

Slashdot - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 4:00pm
Reader OneHundredAndTen writes and shares a report: Systemd doing what it does best. From a report on The Register: A few Penguinistas spent a weekend working out why they can't get through to Netflix from their Linux machines, because when they tried, their DNS lookups failed. The issue emerged over the weekend, when Gentoo user Dennis Schridde submitted a bug report to the Systemd project. Essentially, he described a failure within systemd-resolve, a Systemd component that turns human-readable domain names into IP addresses for software, like web browsers, to connect to. The Systemd resolver couldn't look up Netflix's servers for Schridde's web browser, according to the report. In his detailed post, Schridde said he expected this to happen: ipv6_1-cxl0-c088.1.lhr004.ix.nflxvideo.net gets resolved to 37.77.187.142 or 2a00:86c0:5:5::142. When in reality, that wasn't happening, so Netflix couldn't be reached on his box. His speculation that libidn2, which adds internationalised domain names support to the resolver, was at fault turned out to be accurate. Rebuilding Systemd without that library cleared the problem.

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Space Calendar 2017: Launches, Sky Events & More

Space.com - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 4:00pm
Here's a guide to the major astronomical events of the next year, as well as space launches and milestones for spacecrafts already in travel.
Categories: Science

Shuttle-Era Cargo Module to Become Deep Space Habitat Prototype

Space.com - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:48pm
A cargo container that was built to launch on NASA's space shuttles is being repurposed as a prototype for a deep space habitat.
Categories: Science

Moon has a water-rich interior

Science Daily - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:41pm
Using satellite data, researchers have for the first time detected widespread water within ancient explosive volcanic deposits on the moon, suggesting that its interior contains substantial amounts of indigenous water.
Categories: Science

Allowable 'carbon budget' most likely overestimated

Science Daily - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:41pm
While most climate scientists, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, implicitly define 'pre-industrial' to be in the late 1800s, a true non-industrially influenced baseline is probably further in the past, according to an international team of researchers who are concerned because it affects the available carbon budget for meeting the 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) warming limit agreed to in the Paris Conference of 2015.
Categories: Science

Scientists capture first image of major brain receptor in action

Science Daily - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:36pm
Researchers have captured the first three-dimensional snapshots of the AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor in action. The receptor, which regulates most electrical signaling in the brain, is involved in several important brain activities, including memory and learning.
Categories: Science

Corn gene conferring resistance to multiple plant leaf diseases

Science Daily - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:36pm
Researchers have found a specific gene in corn that appears to be associated with resistance to two and possibly three different plant leaf diseases.
Categories: Science

Strength of tectonic plates may explain shape of the Tibetan Plateau

Science Daily - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:35pm
Geoscientists have long puzzled over the mechanism that created the Tibetan Plateau, but a new study finds that the landform's history may be controlled primarily by the strength of the tectonic plates whose collision prompted its uplift. Given that the region is one of the most seismically active areas in the world, understanding the plateau's geologic history could give scientists insight to modern day earthquake activity.
Categories: Science

What do sex in moss and neurons have in common?

Science Daily - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:35pm
For many years biologists have wondered why plants have so many genes coding for proteins that are known to be essential for the nervous system of animals, called glutamate receptors. Now, researchers discovered a new function for those proteins, showing that moss sperm uses them to navigate its swimming towards the female organs and ensure offspring.
Categories: Science

'Game of Thrones' Recap Season 7, Episode 2: Nothing Is Certain

Wired News - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:21pm
The seventh season's second episode is a valuable reminder that this show will always love to mess with you.
Categories: Science

Quest for AI Leadership Pushes Microsoft Further Into Chip Development

Slashdot - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:20pm
From a Bloomberg report: Tech companies are keen to bring cool artificial intelligence features to phones and augmented reality goggles -- the ability to show mechanics how to fix an engine, say, or tell tourists what they are seeing and hearing in their own language. But there's one big challenge: how to manage the vast quantities of data that make such feats possible without making the devices too slow or draining the battery in minutes and wrecking the user experience. Microsoft says it has the answer with a chip design for its HoloLens goggles -- an extra AI processor that analyzes what the user sees and hears right there on the device rather than wasting precious microseconds sending the data back to the cloud. The new processor, a version of the company's existing Holographic Processing Unit, is being unveiled at an event in Honolulu, Hawaii, today. The chip is under development and will be included in the next version of HoloLens; the company didn't provide a date. This is one of the few times Microsoft is playing all roles (except manufacturing) in developing a new processor. The company says this is the first chip of its kind designed for a mobile device. Bringing chipmaking in-house is increasingly in vogue as companies conclude that off-the-shelf processors aren't capable of fully unleashing the potential of AI. Apple is testing iPhone prototypes that include a chip designed to process AI, a person familiar with the work said in May. Google is on the second version of its own AI chips. To persuade people to buy the next generation of gadgets -- phones, VR headsets, even cars -- the experience will have to be lightning fast and seamless.

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Categories: Science

Giant 'Rogue' Worlds Are Less Common Than Scientists Thought

Space.com - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:01pm
There probably aren't nearly as many giant planets zooming alone through the Milky Way galaxy as scientists had thought, a new study reports.
Categories: Science

The Moon's Interior Could Contain Lots of Water, Study Shows

Space.com - Mon, 24/07/2017 - 3:00pm
Ancient volcanic deposits on the moon reveal new evidence about the lunar interior, suggesting it contains substantial amounts of water.
Categories: Science