Researchers develop model for studying rare polio-like illness

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 7:21pm
Scientists have developed the first animal model for studying paralysis caused by virus linked to a polio-like illness that paralyzed 120 children in 2014.
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Understanding the impact of delays in high-speed networks

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 7:21pm
In a world increasingly reliant on high-speed networks, introducing microsecond delays into such systems can have profound effects.
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Computer bots are more like humans than you might think, having fights lasting years

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 7:21pm
Bots appear to behave differently in culturally distinct online environments. A new paper says the findings are a warning to those using artificial intelligence for building autonomous vehicles, cyber security systems or for managing social media.
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Tech Reporting Is More Negative Now Than in the Past

Slashdot - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 7:21pm
Wayne Williams, writing for BetaNews: A new study finds that tech reporting is generally more pessimistic now than in the past, and for two very different reasons. The new report from the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), and based on textual analysis of 250 articles from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post from 1986 to 2013, highlights how the tone of tech reporting has shifted in the past 20 years. In general, the ITIF found that in the 1980s and 1990s, coverage of technology was largely positive, but this changed from the mid-1990s to 2013, when more negative reports covering the downside of technology, its failure to live up to its promises, and potential ill effects, started to appear. The ITIF attributes this shift to two main causes, the first being that "there has been a significant increase in the number of civil-society organizations and attention-seeking scholars focused on painting a threatening picture of technology," and second, and perhaps most pertinent, "news organizations are under increased financial pressure, and as a result, reporters may have less time and fewer resources to dig deep into technology issues."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Ball-rolling bees reveal complex learning

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 7:21pm
Bumblebees can be trained to score goals using a mini-ball, revealing unprecedented learning abilities.
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Missing Richard Simmons Is Gripping. And Also Kinda Icky

Wired News - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 7:00pm
If a person goes looking for someone who doesn't want to be found, is that really a mystery worth solving? The post Missing Richard Simmons Is Gripping. And Also Kinda Icky appeared first on WIRED.
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Why a common bacterium can produce severe illness

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 6:44pm
How can the same infection result in dramatically different levels of illness in two different people? A new study identifies two conditions -- a genetic immunodeficiency and delayed acquired immunity -- that explain why a patient developed a life-threatening disease in response to a common strain of bacterium.
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Melting sea ice may be speeding nature's clock in the Arctic

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 6:44pm
Spring is coming sooner to some plant species in the low Arctic of Greenland, while other species are delaying their emergence amid warming winters. The changes are associated with diminishing sea ice cover, according to a study.
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Values gap in workplace can lead millennials to look elsewhere

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 6:44pm
Much has been made in popular culture about millennials as they join the working world, including their tendency to job hop. Although this behavior often is explained as a loyalty issue, new research reveals one reason young workers choose to leave a firm is because they find a disconnect between their beliefs and the culture they observe in the workplace.
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Global vaccine injury system needed to improve public health

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 6:44pm
A global vaccine injury compensation system administered through the World Health Organization would address the global public health issue of vaccine injuries, experts argue.
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Google Says Almost Every Recent 'Trusted' DMCA Notices Were Bogus

Slashdot - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 6:40pm
Reader AmiMoJo writes: In comments submitted to a U.S. Copyright Office consultation, Google has given the DMCA a vote of support, despite widespread abuse. Noting that the law allows for innovation and agreements with content creators, Google says that 99.95% of URLs it was asked to take down last month didn't even exist in its search indexes. "For example, in January 2017, the most prolific submitter submitted notices that Google honored for 16,457,433 URLs. But on further inspection, 16,450,129 (99.97%) of those URLs were not in our search index in the first place."

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Google Has Demonstrated a Successful Practical Attack Against SHA-1

Slashdot - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 6:00pm
Reader Artem Tashkinov writes: Ten years after of SHA-1 was first introduced, Google has announced the first practical technique for generating an SHA-1 collision. It required two years of research between the CWI Institute in Amsterdam and Google. As a proof of the attack, Google has released two PDF files that have identical SHA-1 hashes but different content. The amount of computations required to carry out the attack is staggering: nine quintillion (9,223,372,036,854,775,808) SHA1 computations in total which took 6,500 years of CPU computation to complete the attack first phase and 110 years of GPU computation to complete the second phase. Google says that people should migrate to newer hashing algorithms like SHA-256 and SHA-3, however it's worth noting that there are currently no ways of finding a collision for both MD5 and SHA-1 hashes simultaneously which means that we still can use old proven hardware accelerated hash functions to be on the safe side.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Nematode resistance in soybeans beneficial even at low rates of infestation

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 5:43pm
Soybeans with resistance to soybean cyst nematodes seem to have a yield advantage compared to susceptible varieties when SCN is present. Until now, scientists did not know what level of SCN infestation is needed to achieve the yield advantage. A new study shows that SCN resistance from the soybean accession PI 88788 offers yield advantages even at very low infestation rates.
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Gene mutations cause leukemia, but which ones?

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 5:43pm
New research sought to better understand one 'typo' in a standard leukemia assay, or test. The study, however, encountered a new problem: an issue with the model system itself.
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Contact tracing and targeted insecticide spraying can curb dengue outbreaks

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 5:43pm
Contact tracing -- a process of identifying everyone who has come into contact with those infected by a particular disease -- combined with targeted, indoor spraying of insecticide can greatly reduce the spread of the mosquito-borne dengue virus, finds a study.
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Air pollution may have masked mid-20th Century sea ice loss

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 5:43pm
Humans may have been altering Arctic sea ice longer than previously thought, according to researchers studying the effects of air pollution on sea ice growth in the mid-20th Century.
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Vast luminous nebula poses a cosmic mystery

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 5:43pm
Astronomers have found an enormous, glowing blob of gas in the distant universe, with no obvious source of power for the light it is emitting. Called an 'enormous Lyman-alpha nebula' (ELAN), it is the brightest and among the largest of these rare objects, only a handful of which have been observed.
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Neanderthal DNA contributes to human gene expression

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 5:43pm
The last Neanderthal died 40,000 years ago, but much of their genome lives on, in bits and pieces, through modern humans. The impact of Neanderthals' genetic contribution has been uncertain. Researchers now report evidence that Neanderthal DNA sequences still influence how genes are turned on or off in modern humans. Neanderthal genes' effects on gene expression likely contribute to traits such as height and susceptibility to schizophrenia or lupus, the researchers found.
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New link found between sex and viruses

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 5:43pm
Sexual reproduction and viral infections both rely on a functionally identical protein, according to new research. The protein enables the fusion of two cells, such as a sperm cell and egg cell, or the fusion of a virus with a cell membrane. The discovery suggests that the protein evolved early in the history of life on Earth, and new details about the protein's function could help fight parasitic diseases such as malaria.
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More day cares near by, more germs? Maybe not, according to whooping cough study

Science Daily - Thu, 23/02/2017 - 5:43pm
Researchers looking into how a higher density of day care facilities may affect the prevalence of illness in a neighborhood and found that it doesn't really have much of an effect.
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