New species of bus-sized fossil marine reptile unearthed in Russia

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:56pm
A new species of a fossil pliosaur (large predatory marine reptile from the 'age of dinosaur') has been found in Russia and profoundly change how we understand the evolution of the group, says an international team of scientists.
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And Now, a Brief Definition of the Web

Slashdot - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:40pm
Dieter Bohn, writing for The Verge: Traditionally, we think of the web as a combination of a set of specific technologies paired with some core philosophical principles. The problem -- the reason this question even matters -- is that there are a lot of potential replacements for the parts of the web that fix what's broken with technology, while undermining the principles that ought to go with it. [...] A lot of tech companies are flailing around looking for ways to fix this problem. There are web apps that work in Chrome but not really all that well elsewhere. There are Instant Articles in Facebook and AMP pages on Google. There are Instant Android apps that stream to your phone over the internet instead of being installed, which go away when you're done with them just like a browser tab. Google claims to be trying to bring some of the open ethos of the web to smart speakers. Hell, go back to 2014 and you'll find Apple pundit John Gruber arguing we should consider apps and "anything transmitted using HTTP and HTTPS" as part of the web. [...] And now, a brief definition of the web: To count as being part of the web, your app or page must: 1. Be linkable, and 2. Allow any client to access it. That's it.

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Marmoset monkeys learn to call the same way human infants learn to babble

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:30pm
Human social groups have a strange tendency to share responsibility for taking care of infants; parents, older siblings, and other adult relatives all help to nurture babies. The only other primates that take care of infants this way are marmosets, a group of small, highly social monkeys from South America. In another striking parallel to humans, infant marmosets also benefit from frequent feedback while learning their vocal calls.
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Ancient DNA evidence shows hunter-gatherers and farmers were intimately linked

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:30pm
In human history, the transition from hunting and gathering to farming is a significant one. As such, hunter-gatherers and farmers are usually thought about as two entirely different sets of people. But researchers reporting new ancient DNA evidence show that in the area we now recognize as Romania, at least, hunter-gatherers and farmers were living side by side, intermixing with each other, and having children.
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Brain images reveal roots of kids' increasing cognitive control

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:30pm
As children age into adolescence and on into young adulthood, they show dramatic improvements in their ability to control impulses, stay organized, and make decisions. Those 'executive functions' of the brain are key factors in determining outcomes, including educational success, drug use, and psychiatric illness. Now, researchers have mapped the changes in the network organization of the brain that underlie those improvements in executive function.
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CRKL in 22q11.2; a key gene that contributes to common birth defects

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:30pm
The research findings imply that patients with genitourinary birth defects due to 22q11.2 changes in gene dosage should also be evaluated for other potential birth defects seen in patients with DiGeorge syndrome that would affect the patient's future health.
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In fruit fly and human genetics, timing is everything

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:30pm
Using fruit flies, researchers have discovered a cascade of molecular signals that program gene activity to drive the fly from one stage of maturation to the next, like a baby turning into an adult. Part of this programming involves alterations to the way DNA is packaged. Those alterations open certain regions of DNA to allow gene activity and close off other regions to prevent gene activity. These changes to DNA accessibility occur in sequence.
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Star's Comet-Like Icy Debris Ring Captured in New Video, Images

Space.com - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:00pm
A ring of icy debris in a young, nearby planetary system resembles comets found in our own solar system, new images reveal.
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The Cable TV Industry Is Getting Even Less Popular

Slashdot - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:00pm
Aaron Pressman, writing for Fortune: It seems nobody loves their cable TV or home Internet provider. Wireless carriers, however, are on the upswing.That's the news from the huge annual survey of 43 industries from the American Customer Satisfaction Index. In 2017, cable operators and ISP tied for last place, with an average customer satisfaction rating of just 64 percent. The wireless industry was still near the bottom of the rankings, in 38th place, just below the U.S. postal system. But its 73 percent score was up almost three percentage points from last year. Many of the same companies, like Comcast and Verizon, dominate both fields, ACSI noted. And neither industry offer much choice to consumers, with most localities having only one or two cable and Internet providers. The cable industry's rating slipped 1.5 percentage points from last year, while the rating for ISPs was unchanged.

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Russian Hackers Are Using ‘Tainted’ Leaks to Sow Disinformation

Wired News - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 3:51pm
A group of security researchers present the most systematic analysis yet showing Russian hackers mix fakes in with their hacked revelations. The post Russian Hackers Are Using 'Tainted' Leaks to Sow Disinformation appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Spacecraft Galileo: To Jupiter and Its Moons

Space.com - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 3:26pm
Galileo was the first space probe to spend years observing the planet Jupiter and its moons
Categories: Science

Google AI AlphaGo Wins Again, Leaves Humans In the Dust

Slashdot - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 3:20pm
Google's AlphaGo has defeated the world's best Go player in the second out of three games, scoring an overall win for the artificial intelligence algorithm in the fiendishly complex board game. CNET adds: The human gave it his all. "Incredible," wrote DeepMind founder and CEO Demis Hassabis on Twitter while the match was underway. "According to AlphaGo evaluations Ke Jie is playing perfectly at the moment." The match took place over a year after AlphaGo bested Lee Sedol, one of the world's top Go players, in four out of five matches in March 2016. It also beat European champion Fan Hui 5-0 in October 2015. The match was being played in China, the place where the abstract and intuitive board game was born. The government, however, isn't a big fan of letting its citizens know about the battle and has censored all the livestreams in the country.

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No Matter What Washington Does, One Nonprofit Is Closing the Digital Divide

Wired News - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 3:01pm
To give kids an equal shot at the American Dream, they need access to the internet. This nonprofit thinks that's not a partisan issue. The post No Matter What Washington Does, One Nonprofit Is Closing the Digital Divide appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Handmaid’s Tale: Make Sure You Escape the Dystopia Before It’s Too Late

Wired News - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 3:00pm
Where are the Gilead refugees? Little America, Toronto. The post Handmaid's Tale: Make Sure You Escape the Dystopia Before It's Too Late appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

US Intelligence Community Has Lost Credibility Due To Leaks

Slashdot - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 2:40pm
Two anonymous readers and Mi share an article: U.K. police investigating the Manchester terror attack say they have stopped sharing information with the U.S. after a series of leaks that have so angered the British government that Prime Minister Therese May wants to discuss them with President Donald Trump during a North Atlantic Treaty Organization meeting in Brussels. What can Trump tell her, though? The leaks drive him nuts, too. Since the beginning of this century, the U.S. intelligence services and their clients have acted as if they wanted the world to know they couldn't guarantee the confidentiality of any information that falls into their hands. At this point, the culture of leaks is not just a menace to intelligence-sharing allies. It's a threat to the intelligence community's credibility. [...] If this history has taught the U.S. intelligence community anything, it's that leaking classified information isn't particularly dangerous and those who do it largely enjoy impunity. Manning spent seven years in prison (though she'd been sentenced to 35), but Snowden, Assange, Petraeus, the unknown Chinese mole, the people who stole the hacking tools and the army of recent anonymous leakers, many of whom probably still work for U.S. intelligence agencies, have escaped any kind of meaningful punishment. President Donald Trump has just now announced that the administration would "get to the bottom" of leaks. In a statement, he said: "The alleged leaks coming out of government agencies are deeply troubling. These leaks have been going on for a long time and my Administration will get to the bottom of this. The leaks of sensitive information pose a grave threat to our national security. I am asking the Department of Justice and other relevant agencies to launch a complete review of this matter, and if appropriate, the culprit should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. There is no relationship we cherish more than the Special Relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom.

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Categories: Science

Size-sensing protein controls glucose uptake and storage in fat cells

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 2:38pm
Researchers have discovered that a molecule which can sense the swelling of fat cells also controls a signaling pathway that allows fat cells to take up and store excess glucose. Mice missing this protein, known as SWELL1, gain less weight (fat) than normal mice on a high-fat diet, but also develop diabetes.
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Two genetic variants in bicuspid aortic valve development

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 2:38pm
Researchers report a key protein is affected during heart valve formation, in the first genome-wide study of bicuspid aortic valve.
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Tai chi significantly reduces depression symptoms in Chinese-Americans

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 2:38pm
A new study finds that a 12-week program of instruction and practice of the Chinese martial art tai chi led to significantly reduced symptoms of depression in Chinese-Americans not receiving any other treatments.
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Solving the riddle of the snow globe

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 2:38pm
A new study finds the sedimentation of asymmetric objects in liquid is very different from that of symmetrical objects like spheres. The research may have practical applications in improving water treatment and industrial processes.
Categories: Science

NASA Re-Embraces the 'Worm,' Its Retro Cool Retired Logo, for New Merchandise

Space.com - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 2:15pm
The "worm" is back at NASA, sort of. Twenty-five years after the agency unceremoniously retired the iconic logotype, the retro logo has fallen back into NASA's good graces, at least when it comes to new merchandise.
Categories: Science