With 'Star Trek: Discovery,' CBS Discovers That TV Ain't Easy Anymore

Wired News - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 11:00am
By putting prequel series 'Star Trek: Discovery' on its streaming network, CBS is trying to solve a problem no one has figured out yet.
Categories: Science

Why Facebook And Google Are Clashing With Internet Freedom Advocates

Wired News - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 11:00am
How longtime allies of Google, Facebook and co. became sometime adversaries
Categories: Science

Astronauts Celebrate Autumn Equinox 2017 With One Last Aloha Friday

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 10:10am
It's the first day of autumn in the northern hemisphere, but the astronauts on the International Space Station wore summery Hawaiian shirts, and posed for some stylish photos.
Categories: Science

A New Zealand Company Built An AI Baby That Plays the Piano

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 10:00am
pacopico writes: A New Zealand company called Soul Machines has built a disturbingly lifelike virtual baby powered by artificial intelligence software. According to a Bloomberg story, the baby has learned to read books, play the piano and draw pictures. The work is built off the research of Mark Sagar, the company's CEO, who is on a quest to mimic human consciousness in a machine. Sagar used to work at Weta creating lifelike faces for films like King Kong and Avatar and is now building these very realistic looking virtual avatars and pumping them full of code that not only handles things like speech but that also replicates the nervous system and brain function. The baby, for example, has virtual dopamine receptors that fire when it feels joy from playing the piano. What could go wrong?

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Categories: Science

NASA's Earthquake 'Damage Map' Shows Destruction in Mexico

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 9:50am
A new satellite-imagery map could help Mexico respond more effectively to Tuesday's (Sept. 19) powerful Raboso earthquake, which killed hundreds of people and damaged countless buildings.
Categories: Science

15 of the Most Bizarre Alien Species Featured in Star Trek

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 9:44am
"Star Trek" is filled with unusual aliens, ranging from the humanoid to the crystalloid to the god-like. Here are some of the more unique species from the live-action series of "Star Trek."
Categories: Science

'Star Trek Discovery' Boldly Makes TV Debut on Sunday

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 9:33am
After a 12-year gap between television series, "Star Trek" is finally coming back to a network television service.
Categories: Science

6 'Star Trek' Captains, Ranked from Worst to Best

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 9:00am
The main "Star Trek" captains have so many diverse personalities, but Space.com does its best to rank everybody.
Categories: Science

Solar Eclipses: When Is the Next One?

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 8:36am
Solar eclipses are one of nature’s grandest events. What is a solar eclipse? Why are there different kinds of solar eclipses? How do they work? And when is the next one? We explain.
Categories: Science

Hurricane Maria Damages Parts of Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 7:50am
Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory has sustained some significant damage from Hurricane Maria, officials reported Friday (Sept. 22).
Categories: Science

Most Powerful Cosmic Rays Come From Galaxies Far, Far Away

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 7:00am
A new study finds the highest-energy cosmic rays to bombard Earth come from galaxies far, far away. Space.com reports: The sun emits relatively low-energy cosmic rays. However, for more than 50 years, scientists have also detected ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, ones far beyond the capability of any particle accelerator on Earth to generate. One way to discover the origins of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays is to study their directions of travel. However, ultra-high-energy cosmic rays only rarely strike Earth's atmosphere, with one hitting any given area about the size of a soccer field about once per century, the researchers said. In order to detect ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, scientists look for the spray of electrons, photons and other particles that result when ultra-high-energy cosmic rays hit the top of Earth's atmosphere. Each of these showers contains more than 10 billion particles, which fly downward in a disk shaped like a giant plate miles wide, according to the statement. Scientists examined the sprays from ultra-high-energy cosmic rays using the largest cosmic-ray observatory yet: the Pierre Auger Observatory built in the western plains of Argentina in 2001. It consists of an array of 1,600 particle detectors deployed in a hexagonal grid over 1,160 square miles (3,000 square kilometers), an area comparable in size to Rhode Island. A connected set of telescopes is also used to see the dim fluorescent light the particles in the sprays emit at night. The researchers analyzed data collected between 2004 and 2016. During these 12 years, the scientists detected more than 30,000 ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. If ultra-high-energy cosmic rays came from the Milky Way, one might perhaps expect them to come from all across the sky, or perhaps mostly from the direction of the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center. However, the researchers saw that ultra-high-energy cosmic rays mostly came from a broad area of sky about 90 degrees away from the direction of the Milky Way's core.

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Categories: Science

In Photos: Hurricane Maria Seen from Space

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 6:29am
Hurricane Maria peaked as a massive Category 5 storm as it rolled across the Caribbean in September 2017. See photos of Hurricane Maria from space by satellites in our gallery here.
Categories: Science

NASA Spacecraft Buzzes Earth on Way to Distant Asteroid Bennu

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 5:47am
The OSIRIS-REx probe zoomed past our planet this afternoon (Sept. 22), a little over a year after launching on a mission to the big near-Earth asteroid Bennu.
Categories: Science

Fathers Pass On Four Times As Many New Genetic Mutations As Mothers, Says Study

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 3:30am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Children inherit four times as many new mutations from their fathers than their mothers, according to research that suggests faults in the men's DNA are a driver for rare childhood diseases. Researchers studied 14,000 Icelanders and found that men passed on one new mutation for every eight months of age, compared with women who passed on a new mutation for every three years of age. The figures mean that a child born to 30-year-old parents would, on average, inherit 11 new mutations from the mother, but 45 from the father. Kari Stefansson, a researcher at the Icelandic genetics company, deCODE, which led the study, said that while new mutations led to variation in the human genome, which is necessary for evolution to happen, "they are also believed to be responsible for the majority of cases of rare diseases in childhood." In the study published in Nature, the researchers analyzed the DNA of 1,500 Icelanders and their parents and, for 225 people, at least one of their children. They found that new mutations from mothers increased by 0.37 per year of age, a quarter of the rate found in men. While the vast majority of new mutations are thought to be harmless, occasionally they can disrupt the workings of genes that are important for good health.

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Categories: Science

'Dear Apple, The iPhone X and Face ID Are Orwellian and Creepy'

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:25am
Trent Lapinski from Hacker Noon writes an informal letter to Apple, asking "who the hell actually asked for Face ID?" and calling the iPhone X and new face-scanning security measure "Orwellian" and "creepy": For the company that famously used 1984 in its advertising to usher in a new era of personal computing, it is pretty ironic that 30+ years later they would announce technology that has the potential to eliminate global privacy. I've been waiting 10-years since the first iPhone was announced for a full-screen device that is both smaller in my hand but has a larger display and higher capacity battery. However, I do not want these features at the cost of my privacy, and the privacy of those around me. While the ease of use and user experience of Face ID is apparent, I am not questioning that, the privacy concerns are paramount in today's world of consistent security breaches. Given what we know from Wikileaks Vault7 and the CIA / NSA capabilities to hijack any iPhone, including any sensor on the phone, the very thought of handing any government a facial ID system for them to hack into is a gift the world may never be able to return. Face ID will have lasting privacy implications from 2017 moving forward, and I'm pretty sure I am not alone in not wanting to participate. The fact of the matter is the iPhone X does not need Face ID, Apple could have easily put a Touch ID sensor on the back of the phone for authentication (who doesn't place their finger on the back of their phone?). I mean imagine how cool it would be to put your finger on the Apple logo on the back of your iPhone for Touch ID? It would have been a highly marketable product feature that is equally as effective as Face ID without the escalating Orwellian privacy implications. [...] For Face ID to work, the iPhone X actively has to scan faces looking for its owner when locked. This means anyone within a several foot range of an iPhone X will get their face scanned by other people's phones and that's just creepy.

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Categories: Science

Tesla Discontinues Its Most Affordable Model S

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 12:45am
Tesla will be discontinuing its cheapest Model S option, the Model S 75, this Sunday. What that means is that the all-wheel-drive version -- the 75D -- will take its place as the low-end Model S sedan, currently listed at a starting price of $74,500. Engadget reports: The move to discontinue the Model S 75 was first announced by Tesla in July after it dropped the price by $5,000 a few months earlier. The removal of the model from Tesla's offerings follows its discontinuation of the Model S 60 and 60D vehicles in April, which at the time were the least expensive Model S options available. As well as streamlining its EV line and making all Model S options all-wheel-drive, knocking off the low-end Model S vehicles is also likely being done to carve out a bigger separation between the Model 3 and Model S lines. Custom orders for the Model S 75 will be taken until Sunday, September 24th and the pre-configured versions will be available for purchase until inventory runs out.

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Categories: Science

Ford Is Using Microsoft's HoloLens To Design Cars In Augmented Reality

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 12:05am
Ford is using Microsoft's HoloLens headset to let designers quickly model out changes to cars, trucks, and SUVs in augmented reality. This allows designers to see the changes on top of an existing physical vehicle, instead of the traditional clay model approach to car design. The Verge reports: Ford is still using clay models, but the HoloLens can be used to augment additional 3D models without having to build every single design prototype with clay. It's one of the more interesting ways we've seen businesses use Microsoft's HoloLens, and it's something customers will never see. Microsoft is planning to hold a Windows Mixed Reality launch event on October 3rd in San Francisco. We're not expecting to hear about a HoloLens successor, but we should get a better idea of what apps and games we'll see coming for Microsoft's Windows Mixed Reality headsets.

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Categories: Science

DC Court Rules Tracking Phones Without a Warrant Is Unconstitutional

Slashdot - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 11:20pm
An anonymous reader writes: Law enforcement use of one tracking tool, the cell-site simulator, to track a suspect's phone without a warrant violates the Constitution, the D.C. Court of Appeals said Thursday in a landmark ruling for privacy and Fourth Amendment rights as they pertain to policing tactics. The ruling could have broad implications for law enforcement's use of cell-site simulators, which local police and federal agencies can use to mimic a cell phone tower to the phone connect to the device instead of its regular network. In a decision that reversed the decision of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and overturned the conviction of a robbery and sexual assault suspect, the D.C. Court of Appeals determined the use of the cell-site simulator "to locate a person through his or her cellphone invades the person's actual, legitimate and reasonable expectation of privacy in his or her location information and is a search."

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Categories: Science

Being active saves lives whether a gym workout, walking to work or washing the floor

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 10:50pm
Any activity is good for people to meet the current guideline of 30 minutes of activity a day, or 150 minutes a week to raise the heart rate, new research indicates.
Categories: Science

Alternative splicing, an important mechanism for cancer

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 10:50pm
Scientists discover several alterations in this cellular process with implications in cancer by analyzing samples from more than 4,000 patients.
Categories: Science