Multiscale modeling reveals key events during early atherosclerotic plaque development

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:16pm
A new computational modeling technique could indicate when atherosclerotic plaques will likely undergo rapid growth, reports a new study.
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Mountain honey bees have ancient adaptation for high-altitude foraging

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:16pm
Mountain-dwelling East African honey bees have distinct genetic variations compared to their savannah relatives that likely help them to survive at high altitudes, report researchers.
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Viral protein may help chickenpox virus spread within the body

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:16pm
The virus that causes chickenpox -- varicella zoster virus (VZV) -- possesses a protein that could enhance its ability to hijack white blood cells and spread throughout the body, according to new research.
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A new way to slow cancer cell growth

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:16pm
Researchers have identified a new way to potentially slow the fast-growing cells that characterize all types of cancer. By removing a specific protein from cells, they were able to slow the cell cycle, which is out of control in cancer. The findings were made in kidney and cervical cancer cells and are a long way from being applied in people, but could be the basis of a treatment option in the future.
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Increased leaf abundance is a double-edged sword

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:15pm
A new global assessment reveals that increases in leaf abundance are causing boreal areas to warm and arid regions to cool. The results suggest that recent changes in global vegetation have had impacts on local climates that should be considered in the design of local mitigation and adaptation plans.
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A flip switch for binge-eating?

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:15pm
Researchers have identified a subgroup of neurons in the mouse brain that, upon activation, immediately prompt binge-like eating.
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The perils of publishing location data for endangered species

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:15pm
While the increasing accessibility of data from scientific studies creates many benefits -- and represents a process that should be broadly embraced -- in the context of conserving endangered species it can actually be problematic, experts say.
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Why the Sumatra earthquake was so severe

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:15pm
An international team of scientists has found evidence suggesting the dehydration of minerals deep below the ocean floor influenced the severity of the Sumatra earthquake, which took place on Dec. 26, 2004.
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US nuclear regulators greatly underestimate potential for nuclear disaster

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:15pm
The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission relied on faulty analysis to justify its refusal to adopt a critical measure for protecting Americans from nuclear-waste fires at dozens of reactor sites around the country, according to a recent article. Radioactivity from such a fire could force approximately 8 million people to relocate and result in $2 trillion in damages.
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Magnetic switch turns strange quantum property on and off

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:15pm
A research team has developed the first switch that turns on and off a quantum behavior called the Berry phase. The discovery promises to provide new insight into the fundamentals of quantum theory and may lead to new quantum electronic devices.
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Juno mission to Jupiter delivers first science results

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:15pm
NASA's Juno mission is rewriting what scientists thought they knew about Jupiter specifically, and gas giants in general, according to a pair of Science papers released today. The Juno spacecraft has been in orbit around Jupiter since July 2016, passing within 3,000 miles of the equatorial cloudtops.
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The big star that couldn't become a supernova

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:15pm
For the first time in history, astronomers have been able to watch as a dying star was reborn as a black hole. It went out with a whimper instead of a bang.
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Jupiter’s Super-Weird Atmosphere Is Astonishing Scientists

Wired News - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:00pm
Jupiter's atmosphere defies all scientific expectations. The post Jupiter’s Super-Weird Atmosphere Is Astonishing Scientists appeared first on WIRED.
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Newly Discovered Vulnerability Raises Fears Of Another WannaCry

Slashdot - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 6:00pm
A newly found flaw in widely used networking software leaves tens of thousands of computers potentially vulnerable to an attack similar to that caused by WannaCry, which infected more than 300,000 computers worldwide, cybersecurity researchers said on Thursday. From a Reuters report: The U.S. Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday announced the vulnerability, which could be exploited to take control of an affected computer, and urged users and administrators to apply a patch. Rebekah Brown of Rapid7, a cybersecurity company, told Reuters that there were no signs yet of attackers exploiting the vulnerability in the 12 hours since its discovery was announced. But she said it had taken researchers only 15 minutes to develop malware that made use of the hole. "This one seems to be very, very easy to exploit," she said. Rapid7 said it had found more than 100,000 computers running vulnerable versions of the software, Samba, free networking software developed for Linux and Unix computers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Cord-Cutters Are Ditching Their Cable Packages At the Fastest Rate Ever

Slashdot - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 5:20pm
Sara Fischer, writing for Axios: Cord-cutters are ditching their cable packages at the fastest rate ever, opting instead for cheaper, bundled digital TV options, according to the latest Magid Broadcast Study. The trend reflects consumers' preferences to ditch bundled cable packages for more affordable, niche bundled services that can be accessed on TV box tops or on mobile. For consumers, there are more bundled packages than ever, all popping up around similar price ranges. YouTube TV and Hulu TV launched within the past two month, joining the likes of SlingTV and DirectTV Now -- all at a roughly $40 monthly price point -- a bargain considering the average American pays $92 monthly for cable.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Ancient genetic markers in sockeye salmon can help manage healthier fish stocks

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:56pm
A recent study identifies new genetic markers in sockeye salmon that can help improve management of fish populations.
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Preliminary: BRCA variations may work alongside COMT variation to reduce breast cancer

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:56pm
Researchers find through looking at genetic data sets of presumed cancer-free women who carry BRCA 1/2 variants, the co-occurrence of a rare COMT genetic variant in some women. This research outlines a strategy for looking at large genetic data sets for clues as to why a genetic carrier may never develop the associated diseases.
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Cellular stress in the brain may contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:56pm
Research shows that cellular stress in the brain may contribute to development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
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Predicting threats to rainforests: New approach

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:56pm
A new study highlights novel approaches to tackling deforestation. The team focused their research on Borneo, an island that has lost a staggering 30 percent of its forest since the 1970s and is among the most biodiverse and threatened on the planet. The loss of Bornean forests threatens species such as the orangutan, Sumatran rhino, and the Sunda clouded leopard; as well as emitting significant amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.
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Landscape-scale erosion instabilities in the northern Gabilan Mesa, California

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 4:56pm
If you ever fly from L.A. to San Francisco, California, you may notice the Gabilan Mesa off to the east as you begin your descent into San Francisco International Airport. If you look carefully, you might notice two strange things: a series of bleach-white scars, where rock outcrops disrupt the smooth, grassy hillslopes, and a strong asymmetry in the orientation of tributaries, with many flowing south and few flowing north.
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