Microsoft's OneDrive Web App Crippled With Performance Issues On Linux and Chrome OS

Slashdot - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 8:40pm
Iain Thomson, reporting for The Register: Plenty of Linux users are up in arms about the performance of the OneDrive web app. They say that when accessing Microsoft's cloudy storage system in a browser on a non-Windows system -- such as on Linux or ChromeOS -- the service grinds to a barely usable crawl. But when they use a Windows machine on the same internet connection, speedy access resumes. Crucially, when they change their browser's user-agent string -- a snippet of text the browser sends to websites describing itself -- to Internet Explorer or Edge, magically their OneDrive access speeds up to normal on their non-Windows PCs. In other words, Microsoft's OneDrive web app slows down seemingly deliberately when it appears you're using Linux or some other Windows rival. This has been going on for months, and complaints flared up again this week after netizens decided enough is enough. When gripes about this suspicious slowdown have cropped up previously, Microsoft has coldly reminded people that OneDrive for Business is not supported on Linux, thus the crap performance is to be expected. But when you change the user-agent string of your browser on Linux to match IE or Edge, suddenly OneDrive's web code runs fine. The original headline of the story is, "Microsoft loves Linux so much, its OneDrive web app runs like a dog on Windows OS rivals".

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living

Wired News - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 8:38pm
While Silicon Valley titans are drunk on the transhumanist promise to cure death, people are dying of curable problems that technologists ignore. The post Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Intel Creates AI Group, Aims For More Focus

Slashdot - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 8:00pm
Intel's artificial intelligence efforts have been scattered over many different units but are now being united into a single operating group. The Artificial Intelligence Products Group will focus on the development of chips and software products tied to machine learning, algorithms, and deep learning. From a report: The company has been repositioning via acquisitions to focus on Internet of Things to autonomous vehicles. The upshot is that Intel is trying to build a data center to IoT stack powered by its processors. In a blog post, Rao outlined how the Artificial Intelligence Products Group will work across multiple units. Part of the group's remit will be to bring AI costs down and forge standards. Rao said the group will combine engineering, labs, software, and hardware from its portfolio.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Boy, 4, Uses Siri To Help Save Mum's Life

Slashdot - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 7:40pm
A four-year-old boy saved his mother's life by using her thumb to unlock her iPhone and then asking it to call 999. From a report: Roman, who lives in Kenley, Croydon, south London, used the phone's voice control -- Siri -- to call emergency services. Police and paramedics were sent to the home and were able to give live-saving first aid to his mother.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Instagram Has Two-Factor Authentication Now, So Turn It On

Wired News - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 7:30pm
It takes just a few minutes to secure your Instagram account. Here's how to do it. The post Instagram Has Two-Factor Authentication Now, So Turn It On appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Big-game jitters: Coyotes no match for wolves' hunting prowess

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 7:24pm
As wolf populations plummeted, the eastern coyote assumed the role of apex predator in forests along the Atlantic Coast. New research, however, shows that the eastern coyote is no match for the wolf. While the eastern coyote can bring down moose and other large prey, it prefers to attack smaller animals and to scavenge.
Categories: Science

Study refines filters for greener natural gas

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 7:24pm
Scientists have mapped out the best materials for either carbon dioxide capture or balancing carbon capture with methane selectivity.
Categories: Science

'New' Clouds Earn Atlas Recognition

Slashdot - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 7:20pm
Twelve "new" types of cloud -- including the rare, wave-like asperitas cloud -- have been recognized for the first time by the International Cloud Atlas. From a report: The atlas, which dates back to the 19th Century, is the global reference book for observing and identifying clouds. Last revised in 1987, its new fully-digital edition includes the asperitas after campaigns by citizen scientists. Other new entries include the roll-like volutus, and contrails, clouds formed from the vapour trail of aeroplanes. Since its first publication in 1896, the International Cloud Atlas has become an important reference tool for people working in meteorological services, aviation and shipping. The first edition contained 28 coloured photographs and set out detailed standards for classifying clouds. The last full edition was published in 1975 with a revision in 1987, which quickly became a collector's item. Now, embracing the digital era, the new atlas will initially be available as a web portal, and accessible to the public for the first time.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Critical step in DNA repair, cellular aging pinpointed

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 7:05pm
The body's ability to repair DNA damage declines with age, which causes gradual cell demise, overall bodily degeneration and greater susceptibility to cancer. Now, research reveals a critical step in a molecular chain of events that allows cells to mend their broken DNA.
Categories: Science

Botany: A stem's 'sense of self' contributes to shape

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 7:03pm
It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals like light and gravity. But if plants all have similar stimuli, why are there so many different plant shapes? Using simple mathematical ideas, researchers have constructed a framework that explains and quantifies the different shapes of plant stems.
Categories: Science

Evidence-based diagnostic model for mental illness

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 7:02pm
Researchers have has developed a new, evidence-based alternative to the mental health field's long-established diagnostic tools for the classification, treatment, and research of mental disorders. The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) addresses what the authors say are limitations to the reliability and validity of traditional models.
Categories: Science

What does congenital Zika syndrome look like?

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 7:02pm
Researchers describe the phenotypic spectrum or set of observable characteristics of congenital Zika (ZIKV) syndrome, based upon clinical evaluations and neuroimaging of 83 Brazilian children with presumed or confirmed ZIKV congenital infections.
Categories: Science

71 Percent of Android Phones On Major US Carriers Have Out of Date Security Patches

Slashdot - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 6:40pm
Ian Barker, writing for BetaNews: Slow patching of security flaws is leaving many US mobile users at risk of falling victim to data breaches according to the findings of a new report. The study from mobile defense specialist Skycure analyzed patch updates among the five leading wireless carriers in the US and finds that 71 percent of mobile devices still run on security patches more than two months old. This is despite Google releasing Android patches every month, indeed six percent of devices are running patches that are six or more months old. Without the most updated patches, these devices are susceptible to attacks, including rapidly rising network attacks and new malware, also detailed in the report.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Chemists ID catalytic 'key' for converting CO2 to methanol

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 6:14pm
Results from experiments and computational modeling studies that definitively identify the 'active site' of a catalyst commonly used for making methanol from CO2 will guide the design of improved catalysts for transforming this pollutant to useful chemicals.
Categories: Science

People often use the word 'you' rather than 'I' to cope with negative experiences

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 6:14pm
Researchers say it may seem contradictory that a means of generalizing to people at large is used when reflecting on one's most personal and idiosyncratic experiences.
Categories: Science

Milky Way-like galaxies in early universe embedded in 'super halos'

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 6:14pm
Astronomers have directly observed a pair of Milky Way-like galaxies seen when the universe was only eight percent of its current age. These progenitors of today's giant spiral galaxies are surrounded by 'super halos' of hydrogen gas that extend many tens-of-thousands of light-years beyond their dusty, star-filled disks.
Categories: Science

Most cancer mutations are due to random DNA copying 'mistakes'

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 6:14pm
Scientists report data from a new study providing evidence that random, unpredictable DNA copying 'mistakes' account for nearly two-thirds of the mutations that cause cancer. Their research is grounded on a novel mathematical model based on DNA sequencing and epidemiologic data from around the world.
Categories: Science

Scientists unveil a giant leap for anti-aging

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 6:13pm
Researchers have made a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses ageing, improves DNA repair and could even help NASA get its astronauts to Mars.
Categories: Science

A 'carbon law' offers pathway to halve emissions every decade

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 6:13pm
On the eve of this year's Earth hour (March 25), researchers propose a solution in the journal Science for the global economy to rapidly reduce carbon emissions. The authors argue a carbon roadmap, driven by a simple rule of thumb or 'carbon law' of halving emissions every decade, could catalyze disruptive innovation.
Categories: Science

Membrane lipids hop in and out of rafts in the blink of an eye

Science Daily - Thu, 23/03/2017 - 6:13pm
New fluorescent lipids demonstrate how specialized regions in the cell membrane function, explain researchers in a new report.
Categories: Science