Brain cells show teamwork in short-term memory

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
Nerve cells in our brains work together in harmony to store and retrieve short-term memory, and are not solo artists as previously thought, new brain research has determined. The research has implications in understanding and perhaps treating patients with dementia or other disorders of the brain and mind.
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Study shows how skates, rays and sharks sense electrical fields

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
Sharks, rays and skates can hunt for prey hidden in the sandy sea floor by 'listening' for faint traces of bioelectricity -- they can literally sense their prey's heart beating. The basic anatomy of the electro-sensory organs that accomplish this feat has been known for decades, but the biological mechanisms -- how electrosensory cells pick up faint electrical signs of life -- has remained a puzzle.
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Fighting blindness: Scientists bring a key protein into focus

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:03pm
Scientists have discovered how a protein called ?2?4 establishes proper vision. To study how this protein supports vision, the researchers modeled retinal dystrophy in mice. Like humans, mice lacking ?2?4 succumbed to the disease and their vision was compromised.
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Streaming Pirate Content Isn't Illegal, UK Trading Standards Says

Slashdot - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:00pm
Every day millions of people use PCs, tablets, phones and Kodi-style devices to stream pirated content, but is it illegal? According to Trading Standards, local UK authorities tasked with investigating commercial organizations, if users only stream and don't download, they're likely exempt from copyright law. An anonymous reader shares a TorrentFreak report: "Accessing premium paid-for content without a subscription is considered by the industry as unlawful access, although streaming something online, rather than downloading a file, is likely to be exempt from copyright laws," the spokesperson added. This statement certainly carries some weight. Although in a different region of the UK, Trading Standards is the driving force behind the prosecution of Kodi box seller Brian Thompson who entered a not guilty plea in January. He'll face a trial in a couple of months but it now seems more clear than ever that his customers and millions like them around the country are not breaking the law, a position that's shared by the EU Commission.

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Cancer 'hot spots' in Florida may be associated with hazardous waste sites

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:51pm
Florida has the sixth highest number of hazardous waste sites, known as Superfund sites, in the United States. In 2016, the state was projected to have the second largest number of new cancer cases in the country. Researchers studied cancer incidence rates in relation to Superfund sites and found a possible association. Researchers believe this discovery could help direct public health efforts.
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New approach to improving lithium-sulfur batteries

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:46pm
Researchers have demonstrated a new polysulfide entrapping strategy that greatly improves the cycle stability of Li-S batteries, a new report outlines.
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Cosmic environments and their influence in star formation

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:46pm
Astronomers have performed an extensive study of the properties of galaxies within filaments formed at different times during the age of the universe.
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Tree growth model assists breeding for more wood

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:46pm
A meeting in a forest between a biologist and a mathematician could lead to thicker, faster growing trees.
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New types of structures for cage-like clathrates

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:45pm
Cage-like compounds called clathrates could be used for harvesting waste heat and turning it into electricity. Chemists just discovered a whole new class of clathrates, potentially opening new ways to make and apply these materials.
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Boosting your own defenses against heart disease

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:45pm
A protein found in the heart that is known to be involved in cellular stress responses in cancer cells is now believed to play a critical role in the ability of cardiac cells to combat heart disease and recover from a heart attack. A new study found the protein, ATF6, appears to promote the natural ability of heart cells to ward off stress-induced damage. This finding suggests a novel treatment and prevention strategy for people at risk of heart disease
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VMware Affirms Open Source Commitment By Becoming Gold Linux Foundation Member

Slashdot - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:40pm
Reader BrianFagioli writes: Today, VMware showed its commitment to the open source community by becoming a Linux Foundation Gold Member. The company joins many other successful companies at that level, such as Facebook, Toshiba, and Toyota, to name a few. "VMware has been involved in open source for years, by contributing to existing open source projects as well as open sourcing some of the company's own code. This includes significant participation in and contributions to Linux Foundation projects such as Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), Cloud Foundry and Open vSwitch, as well as other open source projects including OpenStack. Becoming a Gold member of The Linux Foundation will enable VMware to become even more active in the open source community by leveraging The Linux Foundation's experience and expertise in how to most effectively contribute to and utilize open source technology," says The Linux Foundation.

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New York State To Launch Electric Vehicle Rebate

Slashdot - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:20pm
An anonymous reader shares an AP report: New York state will soon launch a rebate intended to make electric vehicles more price competitive with traditional cars. Officials said they'll launch the initiative by April 1. The rebate of up to $2,000 will be available for zero-emission and plug-in electric hybrid vehicles. It's part of an effort to reduce automotive carbon emissions, the state's largest climate change contributor. "We want to make electric vehicles a mainstream option," said state Assemblywoman Amy Paulin, a Westchester County Democrat who leads the Assembly energy committee. "They are becoming more affordable and we need to encourage them." Environmentalists supported the rebate when it was approved by lawmakers in 2016 and have been eagerly awaiting the launch.

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Rejoice in Logan’s Success. It Means Grittier Comic Book Movies Are Coming

Wired News - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:09pm
Comic book movies now have another "hard-R" hit. And it won't be the last. The post Rejoice in Logan’s Success. It Means Grittier Comic Book Movies Are Coming appeared first on WIRED.
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Facebook’s Officially a Media Company. Time To Act Like One

Wired News - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 7:09pm
Facebook has long pushed that it is merely a means for others to distribute content they've created. But now Facebook is effectively killing its own argument. The post Facebook’s Officially a Media Company. Time To Act Like One appeared first on WIRED.
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Kidney disease's genetic clues are uncovered

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 6:42pm
Researchers have identified genes that are linked to the underlying molecular defect in people with IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune kidney disease.
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Turning food waste into tires

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 6:42pm
Food waste can partially replace the petroleum-based filler that has been used in manufacturing tires for more than a century, scientists have discovered. In tests, rubber made with the new fillers exceeds industrial standards for performance, which may ultimately open up new applications for rubber.
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Head injuries can alter hundreds of genes and lead to serious brain diseases

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 6:42pm
Head injuries can adversely affect hundreds of genes in the brain that put people at high risk for diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, post-traumatic stress disorder, stroke, ADHD, autism, depression and schizophrenia, life scientists report. The researchers have identified for the first time potential master genes which they believe control hundreds of other genes that are linked to many neurological and psychiatric disorders.
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Researchers discover new variant on notorious resistance gene

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 6:42pm
Polymyxin antibiotics are used as a last resort to treat certain multidrug resistant bacteria. A team of investigators has discovered a new variant on a well-known gene that causes resistance to polymyxins and others. More troubling, the gene containing this mechanism was found in a healthy individual during a routine medical examination, suggesting that other healthy carriers may be spreading this resistance unknowingly. Unlike any other members of its class, the gene was found in the food-borne pathogen, Salmonella.
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Huge Database Leak Reveals 1.37 Billion Email Addresses and Exposes Illegal Spam Operation

Slashdot - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 6:40pm
One of the largest spam operations in the world has exposed its entire operation to the public, leaking its database of 1.37bn email addresses thanks to a faulty backup. From a report: A faulty backup has inadvertently exposed the entire working database of notorious spam operator River City Media (RCM). In all, the database contains more than 1.37 billion email addresses, and for some records there are additional details such as names, real-world addresses, and IP addresses. It's a situation that's described as "a tangible threat to online privacy and security." Details about the leak come courtesy of Chris Vickery from macOS security firm MacKeeper who -- with a team of helpers -- has been investigating since January. River City Media's database ended up online thanks to incorrectly-configured Rsync backups. In the words of Vickery: "Chances are you, or at least someone you know, is affected." The leaked, and unprotected, database is what's behind the sending of over a billion spam emails every day -- helped, as Vickery points out, by "a lot of automation, years of research, and fair bit of illegal hacking techniques." But it's more than a database that has leaked -- it's River City Media's entire operation.

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Pollution Responsible For a Quarter of Deaths of Young Children, Says WHO

Slashdot - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 6:00pm
More than 1 in 4 deaths of children under 5 years of age are attributable to unhealthy environments. Every year, environmental risks -- such as indoor and outdoor air pollution, second-hand smoke, unsafe water, lack of sanitation, and inadequate hygiene -- take the lives of 1.7 million children under 5 years, say two new WHO reports. The Guardian adds: "A polluted environment is a deadly one -- particularly for young children," says Dr Margaret Chan, director-general of the WHO. "Their developing organs and immune systems -- and smaller bodies and airways -- make them especially vulnerable to dirty air and water." The harm from air pollution can begin in the womb and increase the risk of premature birth. After birth, air pollution raises the risk of pneumonia, a major cause of death for under fives, and of lifelong lung conditions such as asthma. It may also increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer in later life.

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