University of California, Berkeley, To Delete Publicly Available Educational Content

Slashdot - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 10:00pm
In response to a U.S. Justice Department order that requires colleges and universities make website content accessible for citizens with disabilities and impairments, the University of California, Berkeley, will cut off public access to tens of thousands of video lectures and podcasts. Officials said making the videos and audio more accessible would have proven too costly in comparison to removing them. Inside Higher Ed reports: Today, the content is available to the public on YouTube, iTunes U and the university's webcast.berkeley site. On March 15, the university will begin removing the more than 20,000 audio and video files from those platforms -- a process that will take three to five months -- and require users sign in with University of California credentials to view or listen to them. The university will continue to offer massive open online courses on edX and said it plans to create new public content that is accessible to listeners or viewers with disabilities. The Justice Department, following an investigation in August, determined that the university was violating the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990. The department reached that conclusion after receiving complaints from two employees of Gallaudet University, saying Berkeley's free online educational content was inaccessible to blind and deaf people because of a lack of captions, screen reader compatibility and other issues. Cathy Koshland, vice chancellor for undergraduate education, made the announcement in a March 1 statement: "This move will also partially address recent findings by the Department of Justice, which suggests that the YouTube and iTunes U content meet higher accessibility standards as a condition of remaining publicly available. Finally, moving our content behind authentication allows us to better protect instructor intellectual property from 'pirates' who have reused content for personal profit without consent."

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Categories: Science

Meet the Lamborghini Huracàn That Crushed the World’s Toughest Track

Wired News - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 9:28pm
The latest special edition of Lamborghini's entry-level Huracàn is a glorified wing on wheels. The post Meet the Lamborghini Huracàn That Crushed the World's Toughest Track appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Telemedicine Could Be Great, if People Stopped Using It Like Uber

Wired News - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 9:20pm
Dialing a doctor has never been easier, but that doesn't mean telemedicine is working out the way policymakers hoped. The post Telemedicine Could Be Great, if People Stopped Using It Like Uber appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Sprint 'Betting Big On Trump,' Could Merge With T-Mobile Or Comcast

Slashdot - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 9:20pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Speculation that Sprint will merge with T-Mobile USA or another competitor has ramped up since the inauguration of President Donald Trump. That continued Friday when a report from The New York Times suggested that Sprint could be combined with either T-Mobile or Comcast, the nation's largest cable company. Masayoshi Son, founder and CEO of Sprint owner SoftBank, "and his financial advisers are weighing several major possible deals for Sprint," the Times wrote. "Be it a tie-up with T-Mobile U.S., Sprint's closest competitor, or a more ambitious marriage with the cable colossus Comcast, a transaction would allow Mr. Son to fulfill a long-held ambition to invest aggressively in wireless networks in the United States and enable next-generation mobile technology." Titled "The World's Top Tech Investor Is Betting Big on Trump," the Times report says that "the Trump administration's push for lighter regulation and lower taxes has been a powerful lure for cash-rich investors the world over." SoftBank, which is based in Japan, had several of its executives "spen[d] a day in Washington talking to senior members of Mr. Trump's economic team" last month, according to bankers who were briefed on the meetings, the Times report said. U.S. regulators opposed wireless consolidation during the Obama administration, preventing potential mergers between AT&T and T-Mobile and later between Sprint and T-Mobile. With four major nationwide carriers, U.S. wireless competition recently led to an expansion of unlimited data plans.

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Categories: Science

Nothing fishy about new solution for aquaculture wastewater treatment

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:43pm
Aquaculture, or fish farming, is one of the fastest growing sectors of agriculture in the world today. However, farmers in the United States who wish to capitalize on this momentum face regulatory hurdles when dealing with fish waste. But new research shows that a simple, organic system can clean aquaculture wastewater effectively and inexpensively.
Categories: Science

Researchers create new tool that measures active learning in classrooms

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:42pm
A new tool that uses classroom sounds may solve the biggest outstanding question in undergraduate science education, namely, what teaching methods are actually being used in college classrooms, and how can they be monitored?
Categories: Science

Proper movements in Muslim prayer ritual can reduce lower back pain

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:42pm
Five times a day, roughly 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide, bow, kneel, and place their foreheads to the ground in the direction of the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, as part of the Islamic prayer ritual, the Salat. According to research, the complex physical movements of the ritual can reduce lower back pain if performed regularly and properly.
Categories: Science

Unique protein partly to blame for worm's digestive distress

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:42pm
A fusion protein unique to the Orsay virus that disrupts the digestive system of only one type of worm may be modified to treat infectious diseases, according to scientists.
Categories: Science

One in 5 residents overuses electricity at neighbors' expense

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:42pm
Household electricity use falls by more than 30 percent when residents are obliged to pay for their own personal consumption, shows a new Swedish study.
Categories: Science

Modern hunter-gathers relocate to maximize foraging efficiency, study finds

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:42pm
As bumblebees forage for nectar, at a certain point, they will move to another area once their search for food becomes too inefficient -- a behavior, also observed among other animals, which conforms to the 'marginal value theorem.' In like manner, groups of modern hunter-gatherers do the same according to a study. The study 'provides insight on how our hominin ancestors might have moved as groups across ancient landscapes.'
Categories: Science

Consumer Reports To Consider Cyber Security in Product Reviews

Slashdot - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:40pm
Consumer Reports, an influential U.S. non-profit group that conducts extensive reviews of electronic products, cars, kitchen appliances and other goods, is gearing up to start considering cyber security and privacy safeguards when scoring products. From a report: The group, which issues scores that rank products it reviews, said on Monday it had collaborated with several outside organizations to develop methodologies for studying how easily a product can be hacked and how well customer data is secured. Consumer Reports will gradually implement the new methodologies, starting with test projects that evaluate small numbers of products, Maria Rerecich, the organization's director of electronics testing, said in a phone interview. "This is a complicated area. There is going to be a lot of refinement to get this right," Rerecich said. The effort follows a surge in cyber attacks leveraging easy-to-exploit vulnerabilities in webcams, routers, digital video recorders and other connected devices, which are sometimes collectively referred to as the internet of things.

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Categories: Science

Cargo-carrying red blood cells alleviate autoimmune diseases in mice

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
Using red blood cells modified to carry disease-specific antigens, a team of scientists have prevented and alleviated two autoimmune diseases -- multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes -- in early stage mouse models. This research is an exciting step toward therapeutics for autoimmune diseases, which affect an estimated 23 million Americans.
Categories: Science

Skin testing, computerized support tool can improve antibiotic use in hospital inpatients

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
Investigators have developed two approaches to increasing the use of penicillins and cephalosporins -- highly effective antibiotics that are not as problematic as many alternatives -- in hospitalized patients previously believed to be allergic to penicillin.
Categories: Science

Robot uses social feedback to fetch objects intelligently

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
By enabling them to ask a question when they're confused, an algorithm helps robots get better at fetching objects, an important task for future robot assistants.
Categories: Science

How nature creates forest diversity

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
Forest ecologists have long sought to understand why so many different species of trees can coexist in the same niche. A modeling study provides new clues.
Categories: Science

New materials could turn water into the fuel of the future

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
Combining computational with experimental approaches, researchers identify 12 new materials with potential use in solar fuels generators.
Categories: Science

Bubble-recoil could be used to cool microchips, even in space

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
The bubbles that form on a heated surface create a tiny recoil when they leave it, like the kick from a gun firing blanks. Now researchers have shown how this miniscule force can be harnessed to mix liquid coolant around high-power microelectronics -- in space or on Earth.
Categories: Science

Brain cells show teamwork in short-term memory

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
Nerve cells in our brains work together in harmony to store and retrieve short-term memory, and are not solo artists as previously thought, new brain research has determined. The research has implications in understanding and perhaps treating patients with dementia or other disorders of the brain and mind.
Categories: Science

Study shows how skates, rays and sharks sense electrical fields

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:17pm
Sharks, rays and skates can hunt for prey hidden in the sandy sea floor by 'listening' for faint traces of bioelectricity -- they can literally sense their prey's heart beating. The basic anatomy of the electro-sensory organs that accomplish this feat has been known for decades, but the biological mechanisms -- how electrosensory cells pick up faint electrical signs of life -- has remained a puzzle.
Categories: Science

Fighting blindness: Scientists bring a key protein into focus

Science Daily - Mon, 06/03/2017 - 8:03pm
Scientists have discovered how a protein called ?2?4 establishes proper vision. To study how this protein supports vision, the researchers modeled retinal dystrophy in mice. Like humans, mice lacking ?2?4 succumbed to the disease and their vision was compromised.
Categories: Science