New genetic syndrome predisposes the body to cancer

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:14pm
A new syndrome caused by biallelic mutations -- those produced in both gene copies inherited from the mother and father -- in the FANCM gene predisposes the body to the appearance of tumors and causes rejection to chemotherapy treatments. Contrary to what scientists believed, the gene does not cause Fanconi anemia. Researchers recommend modifying the clinical monitoring of patients with these mutations.
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Improving techniques for joint defect treatment

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:12pm
Different surface topographies and materials provide interesting ways to study cell behavior and potentially provide novel solutions for treating joint defects. Tissue engineering methods that simulate native cartilage could prove useful to create cartilage implants in the laboratory, according to new research.
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Smartphone apps can reduce depression

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:09pm
New research has confirmed that smartphone apps are an effective treatment option for depression, paving the way for safe and accessible interventions for the millions of people around the world diagnosed with this condition.
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Party discipline for jumping genes

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:09pm
Jumping genes, transposons, are part of the genome of most organisms, aggregated into families and can damage the genome by jumping. How hosts suppress the jumping is well investigated. Why they still can jump has hardly been understood so far. Researchers investigated for the first time in all transposons of the host organism, which properties and host environments facilitate jumping. They showed that family affiliation is more important than position.
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Personality changes don't precede clinical onset of Alzheimer's, study shows

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:09pm
No evidence has been found to support the idea that personality changes begin before the clinical onset of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia, a new and comprehensive study reports.
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Ultra-light aluminum: Chemist reports breakthrough in material design

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:09pm
Chemists report a new, metastable, ultra-light crystalline form of aluminum has been computationally designed using density functional calculations with imposing periodic boundary conditions.
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Artificial orchid cultivation kit

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:09pm
Orchids are loved by gardeners around the world but are notoriously difficult to cultivate. Researchers have developed a new orchid cultivation kit and have succeeded in complete artificial cultivation of an autonomous orchid. Since this kit can be made cheaply, it can broaden the opportunities for orchid cultivation in general households. It is also expected to be useful in preserving the genetic diversity of orchidaceous plants, many of which are in danger of extinction.
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Quick test may speed antibiotic treatment, combat drug resistance

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:09pm
Researchers have demonstrated a potential new tactic for rapidly determining whether an antibiotic combats a given infection, thus hastening effective medical treatment and limiting the development of drug-resistant bacteria. Their method can quickly sense mechanical fluctuations of bacterial cells and any changes induced by an antibiotic.
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The math of doughnuts: 'Moonshine' sheds light on elliptic curves

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:09pm
Mathematicians have opened a new chapter in the theory of moonshine, one which begins to harness the power of the pariahs -- sporadic simple groups that previously had no known application.
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Positive, negative or neutral, it all matters: NASA explains space radiation

Science Daily - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:09pm
Charged particles may be small, but they matter to astronauts. NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is investigating these particles to solve one of its biggest challenges for a human journey to Mars: space radiation and its effects on the human body.
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Why You Shouldn't Imitate Bill Gates If You Want To Be Rich

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:00pm
dryriver writes: BBC Capital has an article that debunks the idea of "simply doing what highly successful people have done to get rich," because many of those "outliers" got rich under special circumstances that are not possible to replicate. An excerpt: "Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune. For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire. This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favor. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else. Microsoft's success and marketshare may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Don't Rely On an Unlock Pattern To Secure Your Android Phone

Wired News - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:00pm
A new study found test subjects could mostly spot the patterns from five or six feet away on the first try.
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Waymo Partners With Intel, Tesla Kills a Model S, a Lawyer Debates the Trolley Problem and More This Week in the Future of Cars

Wired News - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:00pm
Plus: We play a game meant for traffic engineers, Apple engineers take on self-driving, and Sebastian Thrun wears a puppy.
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Why Google Play Store Malware Is So Hard To Stop

Wired News - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 12:00pm
A rash of malware hit the Google Play store this summer. And while Google has taken big steps to improve Android security, there's no clear end in sight.
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HP Omen 15 Review: Decent Performance, But Man Is It Ugly

Wired News - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 12:00pm
The HP Omen 2015 is an unpretty beast, but it performs well enough.
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Celebrate the Autumn Equinox 2017 with Jupiter, Moon Conjunction

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 11:40am
While residents of the northern half of the Earth prepare for shorter days and colder weather — the first day of fall is Friday (Sept. 22) — there is a sky spectacle to enjoy.
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The 15 Best Ships on Star Trek, from V-ger to the Vengeance

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 11:30am
We love the ships in "Star Trek," not only because they travel fast or because they are often used outside of their design parameters, but also because they challenge the ideas of design in general. Here are 15 of the most memorable vessels.
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Nanosatellite Beams Smartphone Voice Call for First Time

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 11:26am
For the first time, a voice call has been made via a nanosatellite using a regular smartphone.
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Look Up and Wave! OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Probe Flies by Earth Today

Space.com - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 11:00am
A NASA spacecraft will zoom past Earth today (Sept. 22) on its way toward a distant asteroid, and you can give the probe a proper send-off.
Categories: Science

Archaeologists Don't Always Need to Dig—They've Got Drones

Wired News - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 11:00am
On the morning of the solar eclipse, archaeologists took a drone into the desert to create fantastic 3-D renderings of a Hohokam village.
Categories: Science