3-D bioprinter to print human skin

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 2:06pm
Scientists have presented a prototype for a 3D bioprinter that can create totally functional human skin. This skin is adequate for transplanting to patients or for use in research or the testing of cosmetic, chemical, and pharmaceutical products.
Categories: Science

The Achingly Cute Fish With a Suction Cup on Its Belly

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 2:00pm
What oh what will a nearly spherical fish do to avoid being swept away? Suction itself to the seafloor, that's what. The post The Achingly Cute Fish With a Suction Cup on Its Belly appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Samsung Answers Burning Note 7 Questions, Vows Better Batteries

Slashdot - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 2:00pm
From a report on CNET: During a press conference Sunday, Samsung said two separate battery defects caused both the original batch of Galaxy Note 7 phones and the replacement units to overheat. The first battery, it said, suffered from a design flaw. The battery's external casing was too small for the components inside, causing it to short-circuit and ignite. The second battery, which came from another supplier, didn't have the same flaw, Justin Denison, head of product strategy and marketing for Samsung's US arm, said in an interview ahead of the press conference. In the rush to pump out enough batteries for the replacement units, though, the supplier introduced a manufacturing defect that led to the same result, he said. The explanation puts to rest the mystery behind the exploding Note 7, but it kicks off a new challenge for the embattled company: winning back your trust after a disastrous several months that included two recalls and the decision to kill the critically acclaimed phone. The Sunday press conference marked the start of a Samsung campaign to rebuild company credibility, which will include the upcoming launch of the flagship Galaxy S8 phone, as well as another Note later in the year.

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Categories: Science

Western Union Pays $586M Fine Over Wire Fraud Charges

Slashdot - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 12:30pm
The head of the FTC says Western Union "facilitated scammers and rip-offs," while the company "looked the other way." An anonymous reader quotes Reuters: The world's biggest money-transfer company agreed to pay $586 million and admitted to turning a blind eye as criminals used its service for money laundering and fraud, U.S. authorities said on Thursday. Western Union, which has over half a million locations in more than 200 countries, admitted "to aiding and abetting wire fraud" by allowing scammers to process transactions, even when the company realized its agents were helping scammers avoid detection, the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission said in statements... Fraudsters offering fake prizes and job opportunities swindled tens of thousands of U.S. consumers, giving Western Union agents a cut in return for processing the payments, authorities said. Between 2004 and 2012, the Colorado-based company knew of fraudulent transactions but failed to take steps that would have resulted in disciplining of 2,000 agents, authorities said... Between 2004 and 2015 Western Union collected 550,928 complaints about fraud, with 80 percent of them coming from the United States where it has some 50,000 locations, the government complaint said. The average consumer complaint was for $1,148, the government said. Reuters seemed to suggest that nearly one out of every thousand transactions was fraudulent, reporting that Western Union "said consumer fraud accounts for less than one-tenth of 1 percent of consumer-to-consumer transactions."

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Categories: Science

The Military May Soon Buy the Same Drones You Do

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 12:07pm
The Pentagon may find a glimpse of future scout drones in commercial off-the-shelf technologies. The post The Military May Soon Buy the Same Drones You Do appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Beautiful Literary Star Charts Map Famous First Sentences

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 12:00pm
Data artist Nick Rougeux's sentence diagrams look like star charts. The post Beautiful Literary Star Charts Map Famous First Sentences appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Inside the Torture Chamber Where Trains Prove They’ll Weather Anything

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 12:00pm
Snow, heat, wind, rain—all indoors. Welcome to the climatic wind tunnel. The post Inside the Torture Chamber Where Trains Prove They'll Weather Anything appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Become Your Very Own Coach With These 5 Athletic Gadgets

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 12:00pm
Athletes can employ a variety of wearable body sensors to get useful coaching advice. The post Become Your Very Own Coach With These 5 Athletic Gadgets appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Remarkable Photos Capture the Light That Plants Emit

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 12:00pm
Sometimes, plants glow. The post Remarkable Photos Capture the Light That Plants Emit appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

So, What the Hell Was That Twist at the End of Split?

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 12:00pm
Look, we've come to expect twists from M. Night Shyamalan, but that was nuts. The post So, What the Hell Was That Twist at the End of Split? appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Asteroid Mining Sounds Hard, Right? You Don’t Know the Half of It

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 12:00pm
Until asteroid mining companies can actually mine asteroids, they're staying solvent by playing in Earth's orbit. The post Asteroid Mining Sounds Hard, Right? You Don’t Know the Half of It appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Cantina Talk: Disney Won’t CGI Carrie Fisher Into Future Star Wars Movies

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 12:00pm
Lucasfilm has officially put that rumor to rest. The post Cantina Talk: Disney Won't CGI Carrie Fisher Into Future Star Wars Movies appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Drone Tests New Tech to Help FAA Track Commercial Spacecraft

Space.com - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 11:01am
A drone that drops into flight from a high-altitude balloon is helping the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to test new technologies for surveillance of commercial spacecraft in national airspace.
Categories: Science

Chunks of Failed Planets Might Have Scarred Early Earth

Space.com - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 11:00am
The rocky worlds of the solar system may bear scars from the debris that didn't quite make the cut as planets.
Categories: Science

Travel the Solar System with New PBS Programs This Year

Space.com - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 10:14am
PBS plans to air at least three unique space-related programs this year, the network announced on Sunday. The shows spotlight August's solar eclipse that will sweep across the United States, the American astronaut who spent a year in space and our species
Categories: Science

Satellite's 1st Views of Earth (and Moon) Are Jaw-Dropping

Space.com - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 9:00am
A new weather-tracking satellite has beamed back its first images of Earth from orbit, and the view is amazing!
Categories: Science

Slashdot's Interview With Swift Creator Chris Lattner

Slashdot - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 8:39am
You asked, he answered! The creator of Apple's Swift programming language (and a self-described "long-time reader/fan of Slashdot") stopped by on his way to a new job at Tesla just to field questions from Slashdot readers. Read on for Chris's answers...

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Categories: Science

Earth from Space: The Amazing Photos by the GOES-16 Satellite

Space.com - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 8:00am
The first photos of Earth from space by the NOAA/NASA GOES-16 satellite are simply spectacular. Take a look at the images in our full gallery here.
Categories: Science

Google Lunar X Prize: The Private Moon Race Teams (Images)

Space.com - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 7:15am
Five teams are still competing in a $30 million private race to the moon.
Categories: Science

Three States Propose DMCA-Countering 'Right To Repair' Laws

Slashdot - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 5:44am
Automakers are using the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to shut down tools used by car mechanics -- but three states are trying to stop them. An anonymous reader quotes IFixIt.Org: in 2014, Ford sued Autel for making a tool that diagnoses car trouble and tells you what part fixes it. Autel decrypted a list of Ford car parts, which wound up in their diagnostic tool. Ford claimed that the parts list was protected under copyright (even though data isn't creative work) -- and cracking the encryption violated the DMCA. The case is still making its way through the courts. But this much is clear: Ford didn't like Autel's competing tool, and they don't mind wielding the DMCA to shut the company down... Thankfully, voters are stepping up to protect American jobs. Just last week, at the behest of constituents, three states -- Nebraska, Minnesota, and New York -- introduced Right to Repair legislation (more states will follow). These 'Fair Repair' laws would require manufacturers to provide service information and sell repair parts to owners and independent repair shops. Activist groups like the EFF and Repair.org want to "ensure that repair people aren't marked as criminals under the DMCA," according to the site, arguing that we're heading towards a future with many more gadgets to fix. "But we'll have to fix copyright law first."

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Categories: Science