Atomic-level motion may drive bacteria's ability to evade immune system defenses

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 3:32pm
A study has found evidence that extremely small changes in how atoms move in bacterial proteins can play a big role in how these microorganisms function and evolve traits, such as antibiotic resistance.
Categories: Science

Hubble's cosmic bubbles

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 3:32pm
Hubble has revealed a few of the tenuous threads comprising Sh2-308, a faint and wispy shell of gas located 5,200 light-years away in Canis Major.
Categories: Science

Weight expectations: Context and distraction skew what we predict and remember

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 3:32pm
Context can alter something as basic as our ability to estimate the weights of simple objects. As we learn to manipulate those objects, context can even tease out the interplay of two memory systems and shows how distraction can affect multitasking.
Categories: Science

In The First Months of Trump Era, Facebook And Apple Spent More On Lobbying Than They Ever Have

Slashdot - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 3:20pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: According to federal lobbying disclosures filed Thursday, Facebook and Apple set their all-time record high for spending in a single quarter. Facebook spent $3.2 million lobbying the federal government in the first months of the Trump era. During the same period last year, Facebook spent $2.8 million (about 15% less). The company lobbied both chambers of Congress, the White House, and six federal agencies on issues including high-tech worker visas, network neutrality, internet privacy, encryption, and international taxation. Facebook was the 12th-highest spender out of any company and second-highest in tech. [...] Apple spent $1.4 million, which is just $50,000 more than during the final months of the Obama presidency, when it set its previous record, but the most it has ever spent in a single quarter. Apple lobbied on issues including government requests for data, the regulation of mobile health apps, and self-driving cars. Google, once again, outspent every other technology company. It was 10th overall, tallying $3.5 million.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Let There Be Light: 2 Killer Projectors for Your Home Theater

Wired News - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 3:00pm
The latest TVs are gorgeously slim. But a richly colored layer of photons is downright ethereal. The post Let There Be Light: 2 Killer Projectors for Your Home Theater appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Make Movie Night a Blockbuster With This Fully-Loaded TV Room

Wired News - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 3:00pm
Upgrade your den of infinite diversion with the right gear and you'll forget what a movie theater even is. The post Make Movie Night a Blockbuster With This Fully-Loaded TV Room appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

How to Set Up a Room in Your Home Just for VR

Wired News - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 3:00pm
You arranged your TV room so you can sit around in comfort. Now, prepare your virtual-reality space. The post How to Set Up a Room in Your Home Just for VR appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

No Aliens Yet for $100 Million E.T. Hunt

Space.com - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 3:00pm
Observations of nearly 700 stars by the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia revealed no compelling signs of alien civilizations, representatives of the Breakthrough Listen project announced Thursday (April 20).
Categories: Science

Celestial Photos: Hubble Space Telescope's Latest Cosmic Views

Space.com - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:45pm
See amazing photos from the Hubble Space Telescope, NASA's iconic observatory in space.
Categories: Science

Trump's FCC Votes To Allow Broadband Rate Hikes Will Deprive More Public Schools From Getting Internet Access

Slashdot - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:41pm
The FCC voted on Thursday to approve a controversial plan to deregulate the $45 billion market for business-to-business broadband, also known as Business Data Services (BDS), by eliminating price caps that make internet access more affordable for thousands of small businesses, schools, libraries and hospitals. The Outline adds: The price caps were designed to keep phone and, later, broadband, access cheap for community institutions like schools, hospitals, libraries, and small businesses. Now, there will be no limit. A spokesperson for the trade association Incompas, which advocates for competition among communications providers, told The Outline that the increase is expected to be at least 25 percent across the board. Low-income schools already don't have enough money; according to a report last year in The Atlantic, schools in high-poverty districts, where the property taxes are lower, spend 15.6 percent less per student than schools in low-poverty districts. If internet costs go up by 25 percent, it may make more sense to cut that budget item, or, for schools that still don't have internet, never add it at all. Add it to the list of things that well-funded schools in already-rich neighborhoods get that schools in low-income neighborhoods don't. New textbooks. Gyms. Advanced Placement classes that let students earn college credits. Computers. Internet access.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Plant's parent genes cooperate in shaping their child

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:37pm
Plant biologists discovered for the first time how factors arising from the mother and father in flowering plants cooperate to develop the shape of their child. Until now, it has been unknown whether paternal factors cooperate or conflict with each other to bring about zygote asymmetry. The outcome of this discovery is expected to shed light on the exact mechanism of plant body shape formation and possibly lead to the generation of new hybrid plants.
Categories: Science

Nanoimprinted hyperlens array: Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:37pm
Research has demonstrated a scalable and reliable fabrication process of a large scale hyperlens device based on direct pattern transfer techniques. The research team's new cost-effective fabrication method can be used to proliferate practical far-field and real-time super-resolution imaging devices that can be widely used in optics, biology, medical science, nanotechnology, and other related interdisciplinary fields.
Categories: Science

How Venus flytrap triggers digestion

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:37pm
The Venus flytrap digests its prey using enzymes produced by special glands. For the first time, a research team has measured and meticulously analyzed the glands' activity.
Categories: Science

Quantum mechanics is complex enough, for now...

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:37pm
Physicists have searched for deviations from standard quantum mechanics, testing whether quantum mechanics requires a more complex set of mathematical rules. To do so a research team designed a new photonic experiment using exotic metamaterials. Their experiment supports standard quantum mechanics and allows the scientists to place bounds on alternative quantum theories. The results could help to guide theoretical work in a search for a more general version of quantum mechanics.
Categories: Science

'Connshing syndrome' named as a new cause of high blood pressure

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:37pm
A new cause of high blood pressure has been identified by researchers, which could lead to major changes in managing the disease, say authors of a new report.
Categories: Science

The protein CHIP unfurls anti-aging activity

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:37pm
Not only does our way of life determine how long we live but so too does our genetic material. Of particular importance here is a genetic program that is controlled by the insulin receptor. A team of researchers has now discovered how protein aggregation affects this genetic program and thus triggers aging.
Categories: Science

Sunflower seeds traced as source of toxic mold, potent liver carcinogen

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:37pm
Sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin produced by molds and pose an increased health risk in many low-income countries worldwide, researchers have found.
Categories: Science

Displaying lab test costs in health records doesn't deter doctors from ordering them

Science Daily - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:37pm
Hospitals nationwide are seeking ways to use price transparency -- displaying the price of lab tests at the time when doctors are placing the order -- to nudge doctors to consider whether the benefits are worth the cost. But, results of a new study show that simply displaying the Medicare allowable fees did not have an overall impact on how clinicians ordered these tests.
Categories: Science

Spiral Galaxies Shimmer in Hubble Telescope's 27th Birthday Photos

Space.com - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:20pm
The Hubble Space Telescope, which launched into low Earth orbit on April 24, 1990, kicked off this year's birthday celebration with some dazzling new views of a pair of spiral galaxies.
Categories: Science

Inside Elon Musk's New Company Neuralink Which Aims To Fight Brain Conditions And Help Humanity Survive in the Age of AI

Slashdot - Fri, 21/04/2017 - 2:01pm
Billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk has confirmed plans for his newest company, called Neuralink Corp, revealing he will be the chief executive of a startup that aims to merge computers with brains so humans could one day engage in "consensual telepathy." In an interview with explainer website Wait But Why (36,000-word), Musk said Neuralink aims to implant tiny brain electrodes that first would be used to fight brain conditions but later help humanity avoid subjugation at the hands of intelligent machines. From the report: "There are a bunch of concepts in your head that then your brain has to try to compress into this incredibly low data rate called speech or typing," Musk said. "That's what language is, your brain has executed a compression algorithm on thought, on concept transfer. If you have two brain interfaces, you could actually do an uncompressed direct conceptual communication with another person." Musk says he expects the project to take eight to 10 years before being usable by people with no disability. He anticipates tons of regulatory challenges in his way.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science