Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

Slashdot - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:03pm
redletterdave writes: The Tor Project has been sued in the state of Texas over a revenge porn website that used its free encrypted communications service. The plaintiff in the case — Shelby Conklin, a criminal justice major at the University of North Texas — alleges a revenge porn site called Pinkmeth "gained unauthorized access to nude photographs" she owned and posted them to the internet. She also said Tor, which The Economist once called "a dark corner of the web," was involved in an active "civil conspiracy" with Pinkmeth because the revenge porn website used the anonymous communications service to prevent others from tracking its location.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

Slashdot - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:03pm
redletterdave writes: The Tor Project has been sued in the state of Texas over a revenge porn website that used its free encrypted communications service. The plaintiff in the case — Shelby Conklin, a criminal justice major at the University of North Texas — alleges a revenge porn site called Pinkmeth "gained unauthorized access to nude photographs" she owned and posted them to the internet. She also said Tor, which The Economist once called "a dark corner of the web," was involved in an active "civil conspiracy" with Pinkmeth because the revenge porn website used the anonymous communications service to prevent others from tracking its location.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

New technology illuminates colder objects in deep space: New material offers more stable infrared detection

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:02pm
Too cool and faint, many objects in the universe are impossible to detect with visible light. Now scientists have refined a new technology that could make these colder objects more visible, paving the way for enhanced exploration of deep space. Scientists have engineered a new technology that can detect very long wavelength infrared light.
Categories: Science

Safety of fecal transplant to treat C. difficile examined in study

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:02pm
Fecal transplantation is effective and safe for treating C. difficile in immunocompromised patients, research has found. Clostridium difficile, or C. diff, has increased to epidemic proportions over the past decade. It is an infection that is often difficult to treat and leaves sufferers with frequent diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, and fever and can lead to dehydration, loss of appetite and weight loss. Patients who are immunocompromised, or considered high-risk, are more susceptible.
Categories: Science

Postcards from the photosynthetic edge: Femtosecond snapshots of photosynthetic water oxidation

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:02pm
Using the world's most powerful x-ray laser, an international collaboration took femtosecond 'snapshots' of water oxidation in photosystem II, the only known biological system able to harness sunlight for splitting the water molecule. The results should help advance the development of artificial photosynthesis for clean, green and renewable energy.
Categories: Science

Ranavirus predicted to be potential new culprit in amphibian extinctions

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:02pm
Amphibian declines and extinctions around the world have been linked to an emerging fungal disease called chytridiomycosis, but new research from shows that another pathogen, ranavirus, may also contribute. In a series of mathematical models, researchers showed that ranavirus, which causes severe hemorrhage of internal organs in frogs, could cause extinction of isolated populations of wood frogs if they are exposed to the virus every few years, a scenario that has been documented in wild populations.
Categories: Science

Birdlike fossil challenges notion that birds evolved from ground-dwelling dinosaurs

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:02pm
The re-examination of a sparrow-sized fossil from China challenges the commonly held belief that birds evolved from ground-dwelling theropod dinosaurs that gained the ability to fly. The birdlike fossil is actually not a dinosaur, as previously thought, but much rather the remains of a tiny tree-climbing animal that could glide.
Categories: Science

One secret of ancient amber revealed

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:02pm
The warm beauty of amber was captivating and mysterious enough to inspire myths in ancient times, and even today, some of its secrets remain locked inside the fossilized tree resin. But for the first time, scientists have now solved at least one of its puzzles that had perplexed them for decades.
Categories: Science

Wake-up call for more research into cell metabolism

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:01pm
More scientific research into the metabolism of stromal support cells and immune cells -- and the role of the metabolism of these cell types in the development of diseases -- could open new therapeutic avenues for diabetes, inflammatory conditions and cancer, scientists conclude.
Categories: Science

First snapshots of water splitting in photosynthesis

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:01pm
Scientists have taken the first snapshots of photosynthesis in action as it splits water into protons, electrons and oxygen, the process that maintains Earth's oxygen atmosphere. The revealing of the mechanism of this water splitting process is essential for the development of artificial systems that mimic and surpass the efficiency of natural systems.
Categories: Science

'Nano-pixels' promise thin, flexible, high resolution displays

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:01pm
A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometers across that could pave the way for extremely high-resolution and low-energy thin, flexible displays for applications such as 'smart' glasses, synthetic retinas, and foldable screens.
Categories: Science

Human cells' protein factory has an alternate operating manual: Process may help body rein in disease-fighting side effects

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:01pm
Working with a gene involved in HIV infection, researchers discovered some human genes have an alternate set of operating instructions written into their protein-making machinery, which can quickly alter the proteins' contents, functions and ability to survive. The study is the first to demonstrate the phenomenon of programmed ribosomal frameshifting in a human gene. Frameshifting helps regulate the gene's immune response, the authors report.
Categories: Science

Cosmic grains of dust formed in supernova explosion

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:01pm
There are billions of stars and planets in the universe. The planets are formed in dust clouds that swirled around a newly formed star. But where does the cosmic dust come from? New research shows that not only can grains of dust form in gigantic supernova explosions, they can also survive the subsequent shockwaves they are exposed to.
Categories: Science

Climate change provides good growing conditions for charcoal rot in soybeans

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 5:59pm
With over 100 diseases that can attack soybean crops, why would charcoal rot rise to the top of the most wanted list? Scientists cite the earth’s changing climate as one reason that more research is needed on the fungus that causes charcoal rot. Fungi may often be associated with cool, damp growing conditions but Macrophomina phaseolina, the fungus that causes charcoal rot, prefers hot and dry drought conditions.
Categories: Science

New paths into the world of quasiparticles

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 5:59pm
Quasiparticles can be used to explain physical phenomena in solid bodies even though they are not actual physical particles. Physicists have now realized quasiparticles in a quantum system and observed quantum mechanical entanglement propagation in a many-body system.
Categories: Science

'Yin and yang' of malaria parasite development

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 5:59pm
A ‘Herculean study’ into malaria parasite development is completed – bringing scientists closer to disrupting the life-cycle of this highly efficient parasite. Scientists searching for new drug and vaccine targets to stop transmission of one of the world's deadliest diseases believe they are closer than ever to disrupting the life-cycle of this highly efficient parasite.
Categories: Science

MyChart use skyrocketing among cancer patients

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 5:58pm
There has been a sharp increase in the number of cancer patients at one hospital using MyChart, the online, interactive service that allows patients to view laboratory and radiology results, communicate with their healthcare providers, and more. MyChart is an online, interactive service that allows patients to view laboratory and radiology results, communicate with their healthcare providers, schedule appointments, and renew prescriptions.
Categories: Science

Study cracks how brain processes emotions

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 5:58pm
Although feelings are personal and subjective, the human brain turns them into a standard code that objectively represents emotions across different senses, situations and even people, reports a new study. “Despite how personal our feelings feel, the evidence suggests our brains use a standard code to speak the same emotional language,” one researcher concludes.
Categories: Science

New approach to remove blood clots

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 5:55pm
Experts are now able to save patients from potentially fatal outcomes from blood clots, infected masses or foreign bodies from major cardiac blood vessels without performing open-heart surgery. The AngioVac is a catheter-based device in which thin tubes are inserted into two major veins in the body through the neck or groin area. Under X-ray guidance, the flexible tubes are advanced to the proximal veins, right-sided heart chambers and/or lung arteries. Each is equipped with an expandable, balloon-shaped funnel tip that, when attached to a bypass circuit, vacuums the targeted material, such as a blood, clot out of the body.
Categories: Science

Immune function predicts infection risk among child trauma patients

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 5:55pm
Researchers studying critically ill children with traumatic injuries have identified an immune marker that predicts which patients are likely to develop a hospital-acquired infection. The study is part of several larger efforts that could lead to the clinical implementation of quick-turnaround immune function tests and treatments to prevent or reverse immune system damage following critical illness or injury in pediatric patients.
Categories: Science