Tribeca Film Festival, Robert De Niro Pull Anti-Vaccination Film

Slashdot - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 12:26pm
theodp writes: USA Today reports that one day after defending the scheduled screening of a controversial documentary linking vaccinations to autism, Tribeca Film Festival co-founder Robert De Niro announced that the film is being pulled from the event. The film, Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Catastrophe, was scheduled to debut April 24. It is directed by Andrew Wakefield, known to many as the father of the anti-vaccine movement. Wakefield authored a 1998 report on vaccinations and autism that was later retracted, He also had his medical license revoked. The decision to include the film in the festival resulted in outrage from many who are upset that the film's inclusion could offer legitimacy to a study debunked by leading scientists. "My intent in screening this film was to provide an opportunity for conversation around an issue that is deeply personal to me and my family," said De Niro, who has a child with autism. "But after reviewing it over the past few days with the Tribeca Film Festival team and others from the scientific community, we do not believe it contributes to or furthers the discussion I had hoped for."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Netflix’s Grand, Daring, Maybe Crazy Plan to Conquer the World

Wired News - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 11:00am
What happens when every part of an online entertainment empire is engineered to be everything to everyone, all of the time. The post Netflix's Grand, Daring, Maybe Crazy Plan to Conquer the World appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

While You Were Offline: Witness the Rise of the Batman v Superman Review Truther

Wired News - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 11:00am
This week the Internet confirmed that humanity is kind of awful. Just ask Tay. The post While You Were Offline: Witness the Rise of the Batman v Superman Review Truther appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

MIT’s Clever New Drone Draws What You Do. Mostly

Wired News - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 10:30am
The Flying Phantograph is an exploration in how machines and humans can make art together The post MIT's Clever New Drone Draws What You Do. Mostly appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Sony Fixes Flubbed Dash Download

Slashdot - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 9:40am
New submitter FourG writes: Not much fanfare (which is to be expected given the niche of the device now) but it looks like Sony posted a fix for the much maligned "can't download dashboard" error. It requires a USB key and can't be done over-the-air. My Dash required a factor reset afterward before it successfully downloaded the dashboard, but YMMV...

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Subverting Oppressive Regimes With VR and 3-D Printed Pigs

Wired News - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 9:30am
Attention cyberpunks: Morehshin Allahyari is using additivist-powered activism to fight ISIS and the Iranian government. The post Subverting Oppressive Regimes With VR and 3-D Printed Pigs appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

How To Solve VR Simulation Sickness: Strap People Into Rollercoasters

Slashdot - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 6:54am
An anonymous reader writes: Theme park owners are trying to breathe new life into old rides by adding VR headsets, according to IEEE Spectrum. In the latest such ride from the UK's Alton Towers, sensors in the seats allow the virtual action to be synched with the rollercoaster's movements on a per-headset basis. As a side effect, this also eliminates the simulation sickness some VR users suffer from when making rapid movements through a virtual space, because the user's body is actually experiencing those movements. Is this cheating or the future of action VR? Counterexample: I haven't (yet!) gotten sick from VR, and generally love roller coasters, but had trouble keeping down my lunch (and then felt bad for for hours) after a vigorous flight simulator at the -- highly recommended! -- Strategic Air & Space Museum, near Omaha, Nebraska.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Yellowstone Supervolcano Eruptions Even Bigger Than Originally Thought

Slashdot - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 3:58am
schwit1 writes: A recent study published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin identifies an area of great volcanic activity along the Snake River Plain between Oregon and Yellowstone. While scientists have long known that the supervolcano now under Yellowstone left a trail of mega-eruptions across the Pacific Northwest, an international research team has found evidence of only 12 distinct eruptions, contradicting earlier theories that the eruptions were more numerous and less extreme. "The size and magnitude of this newly defined eruption is as large, if not larger, than better known eruptions at Yellowstone," said the study's lead author, Dr. Thomas Knott, in a University of Leicester press release, "and it is just the first in an emerging record of newly discovered super-eruptions during a period of intense magmatic activity between 8 and 12 million years ago."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Linux 4.6 Brings NVIDIA GTX 900 Support, OrangeFS, Better Power Management

Slashdot - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 2:26am
An anonymous reader writes: The Linux 4.6-rc1 kernel has been released. New to the Linux 4.6 kernel are a significant number of new features including NVIDIA GeForce GTX 900 open-source 3D support when using the closed-source firmware files, Dell XPS 13 Skylake laptop support, a fix for laptops that were limiting their own performance due to incorrectly thinking they were overheating, AHCI runtime power management support, Intel graphics power management features enabled by default, a new file-system (OrangeFS), and a range of other improvements.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Researchers Prove Shakespeare's Skull Probably Isn't In His Grave

Slashdot - Sun, 27/03/2016 - 1:00am
An anonymous reader writes: 400 years after Shakespeare's interment in Stratford-upon-Avon, archaeological researchers scanned his grave with a ground-penetrating radar to confirm a legend that his skull was stolen by grave robbers. Under cover of night, three men crept toward the Holy Trinity Church with dimmed lanterns and an assortment of tools, according to an "anonymous author, who heard it from a guy, who heard it from his uncle Frank, who claimed to be the grave robber himself." The Washington Post reports this story, published in 1879 but believed to have occurred in 1794, now draws more credibility from the radar scan. Ironically, the grave robbers was said to have been inspired by a British parliament member and phrenologist who'd promised 300 guineas for a chance to examine Shakespeare's skull, but who then reneged after learning it had been stolen from Shakespeare's grave.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

FAA Predicts 7 Million Drones By 2020

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 11:59pm
An anonymous reader writes: The FAA is predicting that the number of drones in the U.S. will increase to 7 million by 2020, though they're still prohibited within 15 miles of Washington D.C. Earlier this month a drone even performed the first FAA-sanctioned drone delivery to an urban area, carrying food, water and a first-aid kit in a box attached to a rope, while a team led by a 15-year-old pilot won the $250,000 first-place prize in the first World Drone Prix in Dubai. The FAA logged 538 drone incidents in the U.S. over the last six months, according to a new report released Friday, including hundreds of incidents in which drones approached airports. But while one incident involved a drone within 20 feet of a plane, "the majority of the incidents are minor," reports The Verge, "with pilots or bystanders reporting drones that are flying in restricted airspace without necessarily endangering anyone."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Are Communications Records of Americans Retained Forever?

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 11:00pm
An Illinois prosecutor announced Friday that a Seattle man was wrongly convicted in 2012 of the abduction and murder of a 7-year-old girl in 1957, reports the Seattle Times. It was believed to be the nation's oldest cold case, but reader Trachman raises an interesting concern: He finally got an an alibi, which was a telephone call which he made in 1957. While it surely is a good thing that an innocence has been proven, the case is also an evidence that American's communication records are retained infinitely.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Atari Vault Hits Steam, Play 100 Classic Games On PC

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 10:00pm
An anonymous reader quotes an article on SlashGear: Classic and retro video game fans will be eager to hear that Atari Vault has just landed on PC via Steam, making it the easiest way possible to enjoy 100 of the most iconic arcade and home console titles from the early generation of gaming. This eliminates the need to use emulators and ROMs to enjoy games like Asteroids, Centipede, Pitfall, and Pong, not to mention it being cheaper than buying several included titles individually.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Names That Break Computers

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 9:07pm
Reader Thelasko writes: The BBC has a story about people with names that break computer databases. "When Jennifer Null tries to buy a plane ticket, she gets an error message on most websites. The site will say she has left the surname field blank and ask her to try again." Thelasko compares it to the XKCD comic about Bobby Tables, though it's a real problem that's also been experienced by a Hawaiian woman named Janice Keihanaikukauakahihulihe'ekahaunaele, whose last name exceeds the 36-character limit on state ID cards. And in 2010, programmer John Graham-Cumming complained about web sites (including Yahoo) which refused to accept hyphenated last names. Programmer Patrick McKenzie pointed the BBC to a 2011 W3C post highlighting the key issues with names, along with his own list of common mistaken assumptions. "They don't necessarily test for the edge cases," McKenzie says, noting that even when filing his own income taxes in Japan, his last name exceeds the number of characters allowed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Slashdot Asks: Do You Support Nuclear Energy?

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 8:00pm
Reader mdsolar writes that for the first time a majority of Americans have told Gallup they oppose nuclear energy. Support peaked at 62% in 2010, but "as Americans have paid less at the pump, their level of worry about the nation's energy situation has dropped to 15-year-low levels," Gallup reports. Their latest poll found 44% of respondents still supported nuclear energy, while 54% opposed it, a trend which could eventually affect the future of nuclear power. The New York Times reports that operating licenses will expire for 36 of America's 99 reactors between 2029 and 2035. What do you think? How strongly do you support (or oppose) generating electricity with nuclear energy?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

IBM Researchers Propose Device To Dramatically Speed Up Neural-Net Learning

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 7:20pm
skywire writes: We've all followed the recent story of AlphaGo beating a top Go master. Now IBM researchers Tayfun Gokmen and Yurii Vlasov have described what could be a game changer for machine learning — an array of resistive processing units that would use stochastic techniques to dramatically accelerate the backpropagation algorithm, speeding up neural network training by a factor of 30,000. They argue that such an array would be reliable, low in power use, and buildable with current CMOS fabrication technology. "Even Google's AlphaGo still needed thousands of chips to achieve its level of intelligence," adds Tom's Hardware. "IBM researchers are now working to power that level of intelligence with a single chip, which means thousands of them put together could lead to even more breakthroughs in AI capabilities in the future."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

India Aims To Become 100% Electric Vehicle Nation By 2030

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 6:38pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report on NDTV: The Indian government is working on a scheme to provide electric cars on zero down payment for which people can pay out of their savings on expensive fossil fuels, for becoming 100% electric vehicle nation by 2030. "India can become the first country of its size which will run 100 per cent of electric vehicles. We are trying to make this program self-financing," said Piyush Goyal, Power Minister. That's forward thinking. However, it's not clear whether the Indian government is also committing to 100% renewable energy -- because if the electricity comes from coal, it might not help with curtailing the pollution level.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Six Charged For Hacking Lottery Terminals To Spew Only Winning Tickets

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 6:00pm
An anonymous reader cites an article on The Register: Six people have been charged with exploiting a bug in lottery terminals to print off winning tickets on demand. Connecticut prosecutors say the group conspired to manipulate automated ticket dispensers to run off '5 Card Cash' tickets that granted on-the-spot payouts in the US state. According to the Hartford Courant, a group of shop owners and employees set up the machines to process a flood of tickets at once, which caused a temporary display freeze. This allowed operators to see which of the tickets about to be dispensed would be winning ones, cancel the duff ones, and print the good ones, it's alleged. The winning tickets would be cashed and billed to the state lottery.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

You'll Soon Be Able To 'Holoport' Anywhere In the World With Microsoft VR Tech

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 5:20pm
An anonymous reader cites an article on The Next Web: Microsoft research manager Shahram Izadi is showing off the company's latest innovation using HoloLens: 'holoportation,' enabling him to appear as if he's there in real-time, anywhere in the world. His image is captured in 3D by cameras placed around the room. This is then stitched together, compressed and transmitted so someone else can see, hear and interact with him as though he's right there with them. You can even playback previous interactions, as though "walking into a living memory," and miniaturize the content to make it easier to consume. "Imagine being able to virtually teleport from one place to another," he says. Well, if you're the owner of a HoloLens, you soon could do. Microsoft's HoloLens is arguably the front-runner in the nascent, but fast-evolving, augmented reality space. The company's technology has previously been seen used by astronauts and scientists to "walk on the Mars surface" without stepping out of their office on Earth. It's fascinating to see how Microsoft continues to further innovate in this field.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Canada and USA Feds Unite To Fight Spammers and Telemarketers

Slashdot - Sat, 26/03/2016 - 4:40pm
Reader Freshly Exhumed writes: Telemarketers in Canada and the USA have essentially been bypassing each nation's do-not-call registry by basing their efforts from the other or from off-shore locations, while cross border spam remains rampant. Now the CRTC, Canada's telecom and broadcast regulator, has announced it signed a partnership agreement with the Federal Trade Commission of the United States to fight against spam and calls from pesky telemarketers. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) consists of all unsolicited telecommunications, unsolicited commercial email (spam), and other "illegal electronic threats" that cover anti-spam laws in the United States and Canada.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science