Inside Germany's Plan To Kill Online Registrations

Slashdot - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 5:20pm
An anonymous reader writes: Germany's corporate giants are promising a brave new future in the form of a single account -- one that will let you do your online shopping, get a flight and rent a car, all with no more registrations or repetitive passwords. Deutsche Bank (DB), Germany's biggest bank, announced Monday it's teaming up with other big firms to create a new company that will create the service. Users would enter their ID details just once before they can make all their online purchases across multiple sites. The partners -- which include Mercedes-Benz maker Daimler, insurer Allianz and publisher Axel Springer -- hope other firms will sign up to their vision. They're calling it a "pan-industry platform for online registration, e-identity and data services." The program could eventually be expanded to include government services. For example, drivers could apply for a new license through the system before their old one expires. The partners expect the program will be running in Germany by mid-2018, and they stressed it will be "secure" and comply with all European Union data protection rules.

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Categories: Science

Effectiveness of yoga in treating major depression evaluated

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 5:09pm
New research indicates that the benefits of hatha yoga in treating depression are less pronounced in early treatment, but may accumulate over time.
Categories: Science

Physical keyboards make virtual reality typing easier

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 5:09pm
What's better than a holographic keyboard? A real one, apparently. New research delves into the different ways to type in a virtual reality (VR) space.
Categories: Science

Virtual reality for psychiatric treatment? Research shows promise for VR and other technologies in mental health care

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 5:09pm
A growing body of evidence suggests that virtual reality (VR) technology can be an effective part of treatment for phobias, posttraumatic stress disorder, and other mental health conditions, according to a research review.
Categories: Science

Brain injury causes impulse control problems in rats

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 5:09pm
New research confirms for the first time that even mild brain injury can result in impulse control problems in rats.
Categories: Science

IBM: Remote Working Is Great! (For Everyone Except Us)

Slashdot - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 4:40pm
An anonymous reader writes: IBM, the company that just weeks ago said it was doing away with its work-from-home policy, is now preaching the benefits of telecommuting to customers. Big Blue's Smarter Workforce Group says a recent panel it hosted at the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) conference concluded that customers who work remotely are "more engaged, have stronger trust in leadership and much stronger intention to stay. These findings mirror what an IBM Smarter Workforce Institute study found," the group wrote. "Challenging the modern myths of remote working shares employee research revealing that remote workers are highly engaged, more likely to consider their workplaces as innovative, happier about their job prospects and less stressed than their more traditional, office-bound colleagues." This is posted without any apparent sense of irony, as IBM said just weeks ago that remote workers were not part of its "recipe for success" and could no longer be permitted to work anywhere other than its six regional offices in various techie hubs around the US.

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Categories: Science

X-37B Space Plane: US Air Force's 4th Mystery Mission in Photos

Space.com - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 4:00pm
The U.S. Air Force's fourth mystery mission of its X-37B space plane launches on May 20, 2015. How long the mission will last, and its exact purpose, is a mystery. See photos from the mission here.
Categories: Science

Your Boss Is Not More Stressed Out Than You, Science Says

Slashdot - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 4:00pm
An anonymous reader writes: Work under capitalism is a brutal psychological gauntlet -- low pay, long hours, and little to no safety net. But bosses usually expect you to take some solace in the fact that you're not doing their (supposedly more difficult) job, even if they make more money. Some part of you might think that's bullshit, but hey, what do you know? Well, according to new work from researchers from the University of Manchester, University College London, and the University of Essex, it probably is bullshit. According to their study, published on Friday in the Journals of Gerontology, people lower on the corporate ladder are, on average, more stressed than people higher up. Worse, according to the study, the elevated stress continues into retirement for average working people. 'Workers in lower status jobs tend to have more stressful working conditions -- they have lower pay, poorer pension arrangements, less control over their work, and report more unsupportive colleagues and managers,' Tarani Chandola, a professor of medical sociology at the University of Manchester and one of the paper's authors, wrote me in an email.

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Categories: Science

Quartz powder for the battery of the future

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:27pm
Materials researchers have developed a method that could enable a breakthrough for the lithium-sulphur battery. In theory, lithium-sulphur batteries can deliver considerably more energy than today's conventional lithium-ion batteries, but current prototypes show a distinct loss of capacity after just a few charging cycles. As a result, they are not yet fit for widespread use, for instance in electric vehicles. With their new method, the researchers were able to gain crucial insights into how the rapid capacity loss occurs. And they showed: if quartz powder is added to the liquid component of the battery, this loss can be slowed down.
Categories: Science

First-ever autonomously controlled 'capsule robot' explores colon

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:25pm
New research shows that an 18-mm magnetized capsule colonoscope, which can be paired with standard medical instruments, successfully performed intricate maneuvers inside the colon while guided by an external magnet attached to a robotic arm. Researchers believe this technology will reduce the potential discomfort of colonoscopies and lead to more people undergoing the life-saving screening test.
Categories: Science

New plutonium discovery lights way for chemistry professor's work to clean up nuclear waste

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
A chemistry professor created a plutonium compound that behaves much more like lighter elements, giving scientists new information about how this element works.
Categories: Science

Gap growing between longest and shortest lifespans in the US

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
Babies born today in 13 US counties have shorter expected lifespans than their parents did when they were born decades ago, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

To improve chronic pain, get more sleep (coffee helps too)

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
New research shows that chronic sleep loss increases pain sensitivity. It suggests that chronic pain sufferers can get relief by getting more sleep, or, short of that, taking medications to promote wakefulness such as caffeine.
Categories: Science

New major gene expression regulator in fungi

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
Changing a single letter, or base, in an organism's genetic code impact its traits. Subtler changes can and do happen: in eukaryotes, one such modification involves adding a methyl group to base 6 of adenine (6mA). Researchers report the prevalence of 6mA modifications in the earliest branches of the fungal kingdom. This little-explored realm provides a repertoire of important and valuable gene products for DOE missions in bioenergy and environment.
Categories: Science

Testosterone explains why women more prone to asthma

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
An international research team has revealed for the first time that testosterone protects males against developing asthma, helping to explain why females are two times more likely to develop asthma than males after puberty. The study showed that testosterone suppresses the production of a type of immune cell that triggers allergic asthma. The finding may lead to new, more targeted asthma treatments.
Categories: Science

Changes in Early Stone Age tool production have 'musical' ties

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
New research suggests that advances in the production of Early Stone Age tools had less to do with the evolution of language and more to do with the brain networks involved in modern piano playing. The findings are a major step forward in understanding the evolution of human intelligence.
Categories: Science

How do toddlers learn best from touchscreens?

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
New research suggests that Educational apps for kids can be valuable learning tools, but there's still a lot left to understand about how to best design them.
Categories: Science

The evolutionary story of the birch tree, told through 80 genomes

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
A new study sequences the genomes of 80 silver birch trees, a tree that has not been studied much by scientists despite its commercial value for papermaking, construction, furniture-building and more. Researchers identified genetic mutations including mutations that may affect how well birch trees grow and respond to light at different latitudes and longitudes and under different environmental conditions. The research could help breed trees that better meet the needs of various industries.
Categories: Science

Global warming kills gut bacteria in lizards

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
Climate change could threaten reptiles by reducing the number of bacteria living in their guts, new research suggests.
Categories: Science

Neuronal targets to restore movement in Parkinson's disease model

Science Daily - Mon, 08/05/2017 - 3:24pm
Researchers have identified two groups of neurons that can be turned on and off to alleviate the movement-related symptoms of Parkinson's disease. The activation of these cells in the basal ganglia relieves symptoms for much longer than current therapies, like deep brain stimulation and pharmaceuticals. The study, completed in a mouse model of Parkinson's, used optogenetics to better understand the neural circuitry involved in Parkinson's disease, and could provide the basis for new experimental treatment protocols.
Categories: Science