Disruptions to embryonic reprogramming alter adult mouse behavior

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 3:00am
When the process of epigenetic reprogramming is defective in mouse development, the consequences in adulthood can include abnormal repetitive behaviors, scientists have shown.
Categories: Science

Super Bowl celebrations spread flu, according to researchers

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 3:00am
Cities with teams in the Super Bowl see a rise in flu deaths, new research shows. The effects are greater when the Super Bowl occurs close to the peak of flu season or when the dominant influenza strain is more lethal. Models show this year's flu season could be a mild one, but the virus will still kill thousands of people and sicken many more.
Categories: Science

When loved ones battle cancer, families head to Web for information more than support

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 2:59am
Loved ones of cancer patients are likely to search for further information about the disease online but less inclined to seek emotional support from social media forums, according to a study. It is fairly common for loved ones of cancer patients to develop depression or anxiety disorders, but there aren't many studies focusing specifically on cancer patients' caregivers and family members, said the study's author.
Categories: Science

Evidence-based health care: The care you want, but might not be getting

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 2:59am
As hospital leaders continue to feel pressure to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs, a new study reveals one reason why many organizations fall short. Use of evidence-based practice among chief nurses and their hospitals is relatively low, according to a survey.
Categories: Science

New research sharpens understanding of poison-arrow hunting in Africa

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 2:59am
A comprehensive study of the hunting tradition of the San peoples of Namibia sheds new light on their use of beetle and plant poisons to boost the lethality of their arrows.
Categories: Science

Sparse coverage hinders infertility treatment access

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 2:59am
Use of infertility treatments in the United States, ranging from medicines to in vitro fertilization, is likely hindered by widespread gaps in insurance coverage of reproductive services and technology.
Categories: Science

US Forest Service releases findings on the effects of drought for forests, rangelands

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 2:56am
The US Forest Service has released a new report that provides a national assessment of peer-reviewed scientific research on the impacts of drought on US forests and rangelands. This report will help the Forest Service better manage forests and grasslands impacted by climate change.
Categories: Science

Making the leap from sequence data to actionable targets in clinical oncology

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 2:50am
The ever-shrinking cost of DNA sequencing improves accessibility for an increasing number of people and, importantly, for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. This is particularly salient in cancer genetics, as cancer is often the result of mutation in not one gene, but many. Moreover, personalized genomics is the foundation of precision medicine; however, having the DNA sequence in hand is only half of the equation.
Categories: Science

Fine Brothers File For Trademark On Word "React"

Slashdot - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 1:23am
DewDude writes: You've probably seen them on YouTube: Fine Brothers are the two behind the video series Teens React, Kids React, and Elders React. Well, the two seem to feel they somehow invented this whole thing and have now filed for a very broad trademark. The USPTO filing says the trademark will be published tomorrow and looking at the filing; it is literally for the word "react" and simply shows a screenshot of their YouTube page. They have also apparently gotten approval for "Parents React," "Celebrities React," and "Parents React"; as well as filed applications for things such as "Do They Know It," "Lyric Breakdown," "People v. Technology," and "Try Not To Smile Or Laugh."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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The 2016 Iowa Caucuses Liveblog: Cruz Beats Trump

Wired News - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 12:39am

WIRED is reporting from Iowa, tracking how technology and innovation are changing the modern day campaign. Tonight we're live-blogging from Des Moines!

The post The 2016 Iowa Caucuses Liveblog: Cruz Beats Trump appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Google To Take 'Apple-Like' Control Over Nexus Phones

Slashdot - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 12:17am
Soulskill writes: According to a (paywalled) report in The Information, Google CEO Sundar Pichai wants the company to take greater control over development of their Nexus smartphones. When producing Nexus phones, Google has always partnered with manufacturers, like Samsung, LG, and HTC, who actually built the devices. Rather than creating a true revenue stream, Google's main goal has been to provide a reference for what Android can be like without interference from carriers and manufacturers. (For example, many users are frustrated by Samsung's TouchWiz skin, as well as the bloatware resulting from deals with carriers. But now, Google appears to want more control. The report indicates Google wants to do a better job of competing throughout the market. They want to compete with Apple on the high end, but also seem concerned that manufacturers haven't put enough effort into quality budget phones. The article at Droid-Life argues, "We all know that Nexus phones will never be household items until Google puts some marketing dollars behind them. Will a top-to-bottom approach finally push them to do that?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

We Now Know How Much It Costs Google To Shoot For the Moon

Wired News - Mon, 01/02/2016 - 11:42pm

It's billyuns and billyuns.

The post We Now Know How Much It Costs Google To Shoot For the Moon appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Harvard: No, Crypto Isn't Making the FBI Go Dark

Slashdot - Mon, 01/02/2016 - 11:20pm
Trailrunner7 writes: The FBI and other law enforcement and intelligence agencies have warned for years that the increased use of encryption by consumers is making surveillance and lawful interception much more difficult, impeding investigations. But a new study by a group of experts at Harvard's Berkman Center says those claims are largely overblown and that the IoT revolution will give agencies plenty of new chances for clear-channel surveillance. "We argue that communications in the future will neither be eclipsed into darkness nor illuminated without shadow. Market forces and commercial interests will likely limit the circumstances in which companies will offer encryption that obscures user data from the companies themselves, and the trajectory of technological development points to a future abundant in unencrypted data, some of which can fill gaps left by the very communication channels law enforcement fears will 'go dark' and beyond reach," the Berkman Center report says.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

In Iowa, the Door Knock Lives on in the Age of High-Tech Politics

Wired News - Mon, 01/02/2016 - 11:04pm

Technology may be changing politics in endless ways, but some traditions—like old-fashioned face-to-face canvassing—take a lot longer to alter.

The post In Iowa, the Door Knock Lives on in the Age of High-Tech Politics appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

One Billion People Now Use WhatsApp

Wired News - Mon, 01/02/2016 - 11:00pm

That's about one in seven people on Earth.

The post One Billion People Now Use WhatsApp appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Jaguar Land Rover To Test Autonomous Cars In 'Living Lab'

Slashdot - Mon, 01/02/2016 - 10:46pm
An anonymous reader writes: British automaker Jaguar Land Rover has announced its £5.5 million investment in a 'living lab' for the testing and development of connected and self-driving car technologies. The UK Connected Intelligent Transport Environment (CITE) will span 41-miles of public roads around Coventry and Solihull, and will be used to test new connected and autonomous vehicle (CAV) systems in real-life conditions. The company is planning to install roadside sensor equipment around the lab route to monitor vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications. The fleet will include 100 CAV cars, which will test four different connectivity technologies; 4G long-term evolution (LTE) and its more advanced version LTE-V, dedicated short-range communication (DSRC), and local Wi-Fi hotspots.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Restless Chilean Volcano Nevados de Chillán Unleashes a Series of Explosions

Wired News - Mon, 01/02/2016 - 10:40pm

Nevados de Chillán is showing signs of continued restlessness. The question is where does it lead.

The post Restless Chilean Volcano Nevados de Chillán Unleashes a Series of Explosions appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Alphabet Passes Apple to Become the World’s Most Valuable Company

Wired News - Mon, 01/02/2016 - 10:27pm

Google’s parent company, Alphabet, is now the most valuable company in the world.

The post Alphabet Passes Apple to Become the World’s Most Valuable Company appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

One Hoss Shay and Our Society of Obsolescence

Slashdot - Mon, 01/02/2016 - 10:06pm
szczys writes: The last time you replaced your smart phone, was the entire thing shot or had just one part gone bad? Pretty much every time it's one thing; the screen has cracked, or the WiFi stopped working predictably. But the other parts of the phone were fine. The same is true for laptops, or cars, or one-horse carriages. In fact this is a concept that has been recognized for well over one hundred years. The stuff we buy isn't meant to last forever, otherwise we wouldn't buy more of them. And for that matter, nothing lasts forever despite design. But what if everything was optimized to fail all at once? Instead of a single point of weakness, all parts wore equally and failed in the same time frame. Finding a balance between the One Hoss Shay model, and encouraging the return of user-serviceable parts would go a long way toward making sure that replacement is a choice and not a necessity. (And here's a nicely illustrated version of One Hoss Shay.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Former Yahoo Employee Challenges the Legality of Yahoo's Ranking System

Slashdot - Mon, 01/02/2016 - 9:27pm
whoever57 writes: A former employee of Yahoo is challenging Yahoo's performance review and termination process. The ranking system was introduced to Yahoo by Ms. Mayer on the recommendation of management consultants McKinsey & Co.. Gregory Anderson, an editor who oversaw Yahoo's autos, homes, shopping, small business and travel sites in Sunnyvale, Calif. is claiming that the ranking and termination process was flawed to the extent that the terminations were not based on performance and hence constitute mass layoffs, which require notice periods under both California and Federal law. He is also alleging gender discrimination, under which women were given preferential treatment over men in the hiring, promotions and layoff processes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science