NASA's Historic Countdown Clock is Ticking Again for Launch Spectators

Space.com - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:15pm
NASA's historic countdown clock, which ticked off the seconds before rocket launches for decades, was retired in 2014, but has been relocated to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.
Categories: Science

'Grand vision' to regulate allergies in food

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:13pm
A new review of allergen analysis aims to improve the situation for those living with food allergies -- preventing food fraud and protecting consumers. Food allergies are a rapidly growing problem in the developed world, affecting up to 10% of children and 2-3% of adults, yet allergens remain challenging to analyze accurately, making it difficult to legislate and manage risk.
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Survival of species suddenly looks better

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:13pm
Findings on Norway spruce show how plants and animals can adapt better to climate change than previously envisaged. The spruce remembers what the temperature conditions were like when it was a seed, the researchers report. This memory helps it adapt to climate change.
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Early detection of allergies, especially in children

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:13pm
People can become allergically sensitized straight from birth. The importance of early screening is therefore important to detect allergies early for the purposes of preventing serious illness. Therefore, true to the slogan for this 2016 action week, "Close the Immunization Gap" the aim is essentially to close gaps in the provision of immunization. However, a prerequisite for providing protective immunization against allergies is to have an accurate allergy diagnosis in the first place.
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Stepless control devices with flexible pressure sensors

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:13pm
Silicone is so soft and flexible that it is easily deformed by the pressure of a finger. Researchers have recently created sensors made from this flexible material, making it easier to steplessly control devices. Researchers now present a glove that can measure pressure and a steering wheel that lets the driver control music, light and ventilation at the touch of a finger.
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Culture, crowding and social influence all tied to aggressive driving behavior

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:09pm
A study of angry, competitive and aggressive driving suggests that these dangerous behaviors are becoming a worldwide phenomenon of almost epidemic proportions, and are a reflection of a person's surrounding culture, both on the road and on a broader social level.
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Who gets hooked on drugs? Rat study finds genetic markers that influence addiction

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:09pm
Why does addiction vulnerability differ from individual to individual? For the first time, scientists have shown in selectively bred animals that the propensity for addiction is linked to differences in expression of genes for specific molecules in a specific brain region. It's also the first demonstration that a DNA tag called an epigenetic marker can predispose an individual to addiction and relapse.
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Measuring happiness on social media

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:09pm
Happiness. It's something we all strive for, but how do we measure it--as a country? A global community? Computer scientists used two years of Twitter data to measure users' life satisfaction, a component of happiness.
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Origins, spread of potentially deadly Valley Fever tracked

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:07pm
Scientists have tracked the likely origins and dispersal of the fungus that causes Valley Fever. In a story that spans 2 million years and includes the effects of glaciation and the pre-historic movements of animal hosts, the study sets the stage for tracking future outbreaks of this potentially deadly dust-bound disease as it spreads across arid regions of North and South America.
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One minus one does not always equal zero in chemistry

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:07pm
In 1848, Louis Pasteur showed that molecules that are mirror images of each other had exactly opposite rotations of light. When mixed in solution, they cancel the effects of the other, and no rotation of light is observed. Now, a research team has demonstrated that a mixture of mirror-image molecules crystallized in the solid state can be optically active.
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Chemists use DNA to build the world's tiniest thermometer

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:07pm
Researchers have created a programmable DNA thermometer that is 20,000x smaller than a human hair. One of the main advantages of using DNA to engineer molecular thermometers is that DNA chemistry is relatively simple and programmable. So, the research team has created various DNA structures that can fold and unfold at specifically defined temperatures.
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Food allergies of low-income kids are poorly managed

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:07pm
Low-income families of children with food allergies spend 2.5 times more on emergency department and hospitalization costs nationally. They are less likely to see an allergist who would counsel them on prevention, get epinephrine or have access to allergen-free foods.
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No need to fast before a cholesterol test

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:07pm
Patients do not need to check their cholesterol levels on an empty stomach, new research from Denmark, Canada and the US involving more than 300,000 individuals suggests. So far fasting has been required before cholesterol and triglyceride measurement in all countries except Denmark, where non-fasting blood sampling has been used since 2009.
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Nearly one in four babies in NICUs receive acid suppressing medication

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:07pm
Though not approved for use in newborns, doctors prescribe the drugs to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to help with other conditions diagnosed in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). However, several published studies have associated the use of some acid suppression medications in hospitalized high-risk babies with infections, necrotizing enterocolitis and increased risk of death. From January 2006 through March 2013, 28,989 of 122,002 of babies, or 23.8 percent, received a histamine-2 receptor antagonist or proton pump inhibitor.
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Families with kids increasingly live near families just like them

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:07pm
Neighborhoods are becoming less diverse and more segregated by income -- but only among families with children, a new study has found.
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Women have problems sticking to cardiac rehab programs

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:07pm
Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of disability globally. Participation in cardiac rehabilitation programs is associated with significantly lower death, but evidence suggests that women are significantly less likely to stick to a cardiac rehabilitation program than men.
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Old world bird in a new world rainforest

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:07pm
The Sapayoa, a rainforest bird from Central and South America, is an evolutionary enigma -- genetic analysis shows that its closest relatives are bird species living across the ocean in Asia and Africa. Now, new research demonstrates for the first time that its natural history links it to its evolutionary relatives thousands of miles away.
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Theranos’ Lab Problems Go Way Deeper Than Its Secret Tech

Wired News - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:00pm
Newly unredacted documents show that Theranos' California lab was deficient in a wide range of lab practices. The post Theranos' Lab Problems Go Way Deeper Than Its Secret Tech appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Spot Big Asteroid Juno in the Night Sky

Space.com - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:00pm
Most of us have played the computer game "Asteroids" at some point in our lives, but how many have actually observed a real asteroid in the sky? The big space rock Juno is now visible through binoculars.
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NASA Eyeing New Mars Orbiter Mission

Space.com - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:00pm
The space agency is asking American companies to suggest design ideas for the possible robotic Mars orbiter, which would launch in the 2020s to capture high-resolution imagery and provide increased data-relay capabilities back to Earth.
Categories: Science