The British Sports Car That Became Ford’s Famed GT40

Wired News - Sat, 20/08/2016 - 12:25am
The Lola Mk 6 is the little known basis for Ford's famed GT. The post The British Sports Car That Became Ford's Famed GT40 appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

EFF Accuses T-Mobile of Violating Net Neutrality With Throttled Video

Slashdot - Sat, 20/08/2016 - 12:10am
An anonymous reader writes: T-Mobile's new "unlimited" data plan that throttles video has upset the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which accuses the company of violating net neutrality principles. The new $70-per-month unlimited data plan "limits video to about 480p resolution and requires customers to pay an extra $25 per month for high-definition video," reports Ars Technica. "Going forward, this will be the only plan offered to new T-Mobile customers, though existing subscribers can keep their current prices and data allotments." EFF Senior Staff Technologist Jeremy Gillula told the Daily Dot, "From what we've read thus far it seems like T-Mobile's new plan to charge its customers extra to not throttle video runs directly afoul of the principle of net neutrality." The FCC's net neutrality rules ban throttling, though Ars notes "there's a difference between violating 'the principle of net neutrality' and violating the FCC's specific rules, which have exceptions to the throttling ban and allow for case-by-case judgements." "Because our no-throttling rule addresses instances in which a broadband provider targets particular content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices, it does not address a practice of slowing down an end user's connection to the internet based on a choice made by the end user," says the FCC's Open Internet Order (PDF). "For instance, a broadband provider may offer a data plan in which a subscriber receives a set amount of data at one speed tier and any remaining data at a lower tier." The EFF is still determining whether or not to file a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission.

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Categories: Science

While You Were Offline: This Is What Happens When #TrumpExplainsMoviePlots

Wired News - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 11:45pm
There was a trifecta of Trump news on the Internet this week. Also, things got stranger and stranger on Twitter. The post While You Were Offline: This Is What Happens When #TrumpExplainsMoviePlots appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Spinning Lovecraft Into a Feminist Dream Quest

Wired News - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 11:30pm
Author Kij Johnson read H.P. Lovecraft's Dreamlands tales as a kid. When she grew up, she decided to write a Dreamlands story with a formidable female lead. The post Spinning Lovecraft Into a Feminist Dream Quest appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Google Will Kill Chrome Apps For Windows, Mac, and Linux In Early 2018

Slashdot - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 11:30pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: Google today announced plans to kill off Chrome apps for Windows, Mac, and Linux in early 2018. Chrome extensions and themes will not be affected, while Chrome apps will continue to live on in Chrome OS. Here's the deprecation timeline: Late 2016: Newly published Chrome apps will not be available to Windows, Mac, and Linux users (when developers submit apps to the Chrome Web Store, they will only show up for Chrome OS). Existing Chrome apps will remain available as they are today and developers can continue to update them. Second half of 2017: The Chrome Web Store will no longer show Chrome apps on Windows, Mac, and Linux. Early 2018: Chrome apps will not load on Windows, Mac, and Linux. There appears to be two main reasons why Google is killing Chrome apps off now. First, as Google explains in a blog post: "For a while there were certain experiences the web couldn't provide, such as working offline, sending notifications, and connecting to hardware. We launched Chrome apps three years ago to bridge this gap. Since then, we've worked with the web standards community to enable an increasing number of these use cases on the web. Developers can use powerful new APIs such as service worker and web push to build robust Progressive Web Apps that work across multiple browsers." Secondly, Chrome apps aren't very popular: "Today, approximately 1 percent of users on Windows, Mac and Linux actively use Chrome packaged apps, and most hosted apps are already implemented as regular web apps. Chrome on Windows, Mac, and Linux will therefore be removing support for packaged and hosted apps over the next two years."

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Categories: Science

That's not fair! Managing envy in the workplace

Science Daily - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 11:12pm
In a recent study, researchers looked at envy in the workplace. The research found a strong link between an employee's feelings of envy after they perceive a supervisor has treated them worse relative to their co-workers and the length of time by which they process this information.
Categories: Science

Why do they treat me like that? Taking the mask off of envy

Science Daily - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 11:12pm
While overt signs of envy can often be received badly, research indicates that how that envy is perceived and attributed by the envied person makes all the difference in how it is handled.
Categories: Science

Refining optogenetic methods to map synaptic connections in the brain

Science Daily - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 11:12pm
A fundamental question in neuroscience is how neuronal circuits give rise to brain function, as disruptions in these connections can lead to brain disorders. Translating the rules governing the functional organization of neural circuits requires knowledge of the synaptic connections among identified classes of neurons as well as the strength and dynamics of these connections. Researchers now report that they have optimized optogenetics to map the neural circuits of the brain of rodents with single neuron resolution.
Categories: Science

The Man Behind Trump’s Bid to Finally Take Digital Seriously

Wired News - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 10:56pm
Trump is finally spending serious money on a digital strategy—at least $8.4 million in July. And Brad Parscale is the guy he's counting on to make it work. The post The Man Behind Trump's Bid to Finally Take Digital Seriously appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Scammers Use Harvard Education Platform to Promote Pirated Movies

Slashdot - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 10:30pm
TorrentFreak reports: Spammers are using Harvard's educational sharing tool H2O to promote pirated movies. Thousands of links to scammy sites have appeared on the site in recent weeks. Copyright holders are not happy with this unintended use and are targeting the pages with various takedown notices. H2O is a tool that allows professors and students to share learning material in a more affordable way. It is a welcome system that's actively used by many renowned scholars. However, in recent weeks the platform was also discovered by scammers. As a result, it quickly filled up with many links to pirated content. Instead of course instructions and other educational material, the H2O playlists of these scammers advertise pirated movies. The scammers in question are operating from various user accounts and operate much like traditional spam bots, offering pages with movie links and related keywords such as putlocker, megashare, viooz, torrent and YIFY.

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Categories: Science

Space Photos of the Week: Star Shrapnel Comin’ Through!

Wired News - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 10:00pm
Space photos of the week, August 14 — 20, 2016. The post Space Photos of the Week: Star Shrapnel Comin' Through! appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Tesla Owner in Autopilot Crash Won't Sue, But Car Insurer May

Slashdot - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 9:40pm
Dana Hull, reporting for Bloomberg: A Texas man said the Autopilot mode on his Tesla Model S sent him off the road and into a guardrail, bloodying his nose and shaking his confidence in the technology. He doesn't plan to sue the electric-car maker, but his insurance company might. Mark Molthan, the driver, readily admits that he was not paying full attention. Trusting that Autopilot could handle the route as it had done before, he reached into the glove box to get a cloth and was cleaning the dashboard seconds before the collision, he said. The car failed to navigate a bend on Highway 175 in rural Kaufman, Texas, and struck a cable guardrail multiple times, according to the police report of the Aug. 7 crash. "I used Autopilot all the time on that stretch of the highway," Molthan, 44, said in a phone interview. "But now I feel like this is extremely dangerous. It gives you a false sense of security. I'm not ready to be a test pilot. It missed the curve and drove straight into the guardrail. The car didn't stop -- it actually continued to accelerate after the first impact into the guardrail." Cozen O'Connor, the law firm that represents Molthan's auto-insurance carrier, a unit of Chubb Ltd., said it sent Tesla Motors Inc. a notice letter requesting joint inspection of the vehicle, which has been deemed a total loss.

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Categories: Science

Microsoft Has Broken Millions Of Webcams With Windows 10 Anniversary Update

Slashdot - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 8:53pm
The Anniversary Update which Microsoft rolled out to Windows 10 users earlier this month has broken millions of webcams, the company said on Friday. The problem is that after installing the update, the company added, Windows no longer allows USB webcams to use MJPEG or H264 encoding processes, and only supports YUY2 encoding. Microsoft says it introduced the changes to prevent an issue that was resulting in duplication of encoding the stream (poor performance). If you're facing the issue, there's a workaround (via Thurrott.com): Rafael has figured out a workaround that should hopefully stop the freezing issue; if you are comfortable tweaking the registry, make this change. HKLM\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\Microsoft\Windows Media Foundation\Platform, add DWORD "EnableFrameServerMode" and set to 0

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Categories: Science

Troll Targets Say Twitter’s New Filters Don’t Go Far Enough

Wired News - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 8:42pm
Twitter's new tools seem to promise new ways to avoid abuse on the site. But it's still just an unchecked notification away. The post Troll Targets Say Twitter’s New Filters Don't Go Far Enough appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Decoding the Hidden Meanings of Olympic Symbols

Wired News - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 8:29pm
In an age where everything is branded, Olympic pictograms must reflect the culture of the host city. The post Decoding the Hidden Meanings of Olympic Symbols appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

The comet that disappeared: What happened to Ison?

Science Daily - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 8:23pm
Comet ISON, a bright ball of frozen matter from the earliest days of the universe, was inbound from the Oort Cloud at the edge of the solar system and expected to pierce the Sun's corona on November 28. Scientists were expecting quite a show. A new study suggests the comet actually broke up before reaching the sun.
Categories: Science

How to keep the superhot plasma inside tokamaks from chirping

Science Daily - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 8:23pm
Physicists have learned which conditions within fusion plasma make the occurrence of chirping modes more likely.
Categories: Science

Standing up for beliefs in face of group opposition is worth the effort, study shows

Science Daily - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 8:23pm
A new study that assessed bodily responses suggests that standing up for your beliefs, expressing your opinions and demonstrating your core values can be a positive psychological experience, report researchers.
Categories: Science

New discovery about sensory system of deep-sea fish

Science Daily - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 8:23pm
Little is known about most of the fishes that live deep in the oceans, where the pressures are extreme, light is nearly absent, and the water temperatures are especially low. These fishes are difficult to observe in their natural environment, and it is equally difficult to bring undamaged specimens to the surface or conduct experiments on them. New research provides new information on the dragonfish, a deep-sea fish, suggesting that it has a highly evolved system for detecting water flows.
Categories: Science

Study finds better definition of homelessness may help minimize HIV risk

Science Daily - Fri, 19/08/2016 - 8:22pm
Being homeless puts people at greater risk of HIV infection than those with stable housing, but targeting services to reduce risk behaviors is often complicated by fuzzy definitions of homelessness, say authors of a new report.
Categories: Science