Preventing early menopause in breast cancer patients with new drug treatment

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 6:24pm
Among young breast cancer patients, one of the most distressing side effects of chemotherapy is early menopause. But a major study finds the risk of early menopause can be significantly reduced by adding the drug goserelin to the chemotherapy regimen.
Categories: Science

Levar Burton, 'Star Trek: TNG' Star, Beams Up $2 Million for 'Reading Rainbow'

Space.com - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:58pm
Talk about warp drive. 'Star Trek: TNG' star Levar Burton's quest to reboot his 'Reading Rainbow' show of the 1980s exceeded a $1 million crowdsourcing goal in just 11 hours. In fact, it's raised more than $2.6 million so far.
Categories: Science

Ford's Bringing Adaptive Steering To the Masses

Slashdot - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:52pm
cartechboy writes: "Most automakers have made the jump from hydraulic power steering to electronic power steering to help conserve fuel. By using an electric motor instead of a hydraulic system, less energy is drawn from the engine. Many luxury automakers have also introduced adaptive steering with the electronic power steering systems, but now Ford is looking to bring this feature to the masses. Adaptive steering builds on the existing speed-sensitive function of the electronic power steering system by altering the steering ratio and effort based on driver inputs and settings. The system uses a precision-controlled actuator placed inside the steering wheel. It's an electric motor and gearing system that can essentially add or subtract from the driver's steering inputs. This will make the vehicle easier to maneuver at low speeds, and make a vehicle feel more stable at high speeds. The system (video) will be offered on certain Ford vehicles within the next 12 months."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Atomic structure of essential circadian clock protein complex determined

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:33pm
For the first time, the molecular structure of a protein complex that plays an important role in regulating the circadian rhythm has been identified by a team of researchers. "Our circadian clock controls many important physiological functions," explained one resesarcher. If the natural rhythm is disrupted, as for example in the case of people on shift work, the likelihood of developing metabolic disorders, diabetes, or cancer is significantly increased.
Categories: Science

Dangers of chemotherapy regimen for bladder cancer patients uncovered by clinical trial

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:33pm
Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer often benefit from chemotherapy before surgery to remove the tumor, but a test of one regimen by researchers was halted when too many people experienced serious side effects such as heart attacks and blood clots in the legs and lungs.
Categories: Science

Researchers see stem cells take key step toward development: A first

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:33pm
The gap between stem cell research and regenerative medicine just became a lot narrower, thanks to a new technique that coaxes stem cells to take the first step to specialization for the first time in a laboratory. Researchers demonstrated that not only is it possible for mouse embryonic stem cells to form three distinct germ layers in the lab, but also that it requires correct timing, chemical factors and mechanical environment.
Categories: Science

Genetic profile predicts which bladder cancer patients will benefit from early chemotherapy

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:33pm
Three genetic changes can predict whether a patient will benefit from chemotherapy before surgery to remove bladder cancer, according to new findings. These results suggest that doctors may one day sequence patients' tumors for the presence of these three mutations, to determine who will likely benefit most from chemotherapy before surgery, said one investigator.
Categories: Science

Identification of central nervous system involvement for patients with AIDS-related lymphomas

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:33pm
Patients with AIDS-related lymphomas may face an increased risk of central nervous system involvement (CNSi) compared to other lymphomas. The effect of CNSi on survival outcomes, however, hasn't been thoroughly examined until now. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, greatly increases a person's risk of being diagnosed with many lymphomas. AIDS-related lymphomas (ARL), which include diffuse large cell lymphomas and small noncleaved cell lymphomas, are particularly aggressive forms of disease.
Categories: Science

Hepatitis C reactivation doesn't worsen survival for HIV+ patients diagnosed with lymphoma

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:32pm
Hepatitis C reactivation doesn't worsen survival for HIV+ patients diagnosed with lymphoma, research shows. More than a quarter of HIV+ patients are also infected with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV), which may complicate treatment and care decisions after a cancer diagnosis. The specifics of those complications haven't been well-researched before this study.
Categories: Science

More patients with ovarian cancer are receiving chemotherapy before surgery

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:32pm
The use of chemotherapy before surgery to remove ovarian cancer has increased dramatically in recent decades, particularly among certain patients, according to a new analysis. Having government-run health insurance -- Medicaid or Medicare -- also increased a woman's odds of undergoing chemotherapy before surgery. In contrast, race and location did not appear to influence her likelihood of receiving neoadjuvant therapy.
Categories: Science

Overall survival benefit for patients with Stage III soft tissue sarcomas

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:32pm
The first retrospective analysis of adjuvant chemotherapy's impact on overall survival in patients with stage III soft tissue sarcomas (STS) has been conducted, adjusted for socioeconomic status and other variables. The findings show that regardless of socioeconomic status and comorbidities, adjuvant chemotherapy improved survival by approximately 23 percent in stage III STS.
Categories: Science

Green tea could reduce pancreatic cancer risk: Study explains how

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:32pm
A new study explains how green tea changed the metabolism of pancreatic cancer cells, opening a new area in cancer-fighting research. Green tea and its extracts have been widely touted as potential treatments for cancer, as well as several other diseases. But scientists have struggled to explain how the green tea and its extracts may work to reduce the risk of cancer or to slow the growth of cancer cells.
Categories: Science

Urbanization, future heat-related mortality linked

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:32pm
Phoenix stands at a parched crossroads. Global scale climate change is forecast to bring hotter summers and more extreme heat to the Valley, but regional urbanization also will impact temperatures experienced by residents. So how should Phoenix grow knowing that such growth could cause temperatures to increase in the future and bring added health risks? Should the city deploy mitigating technologies to help fight summer's heat? Would adopting a low-growth strategy reduce the adverse health consequences of hot weather?
Categories: Science

Phase I study in patients with pancreatic or ovarian cancer

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:32pm
In this early clinical trial with the goal of identifying possible risks and defining likely dosages, the drug was well tolerated and in some patients showed initial evidence of anti-cancer activity. The drug is in fact a combination of a chemotherapeutic agent with an antibody, technically called an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC).
Categories: Science

Compounds in saliva, common body proteins may fend off DNA-damaging chemicals in tea, coffee and liquid smoke

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:31pm
A compound in saliva, along with common proteins in blood and muscle, may protect human cells from powerful toxins in tea, coffee and liquid smoke flavoring, according to results of a new study. The findings suggest that the presence of these defenses could help explain why PLPs are not crippling cells and causing illness as would be expected from their toxic punch and widespread use, the researchers say.
Categories: Science

Tech Time Warp of the Week: Watch a Young Sergey Brin Predict the Mobile Revolution in Wheelie Sneakers

Wired News - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:19pm
The state of the art was a flip phone whose web browser showed you nothing but text. The average laptop weighed as much as a newborn baby. But Sergey Brin realized that big changes were on the way. Fourteen years ago, before Google was a household name, the then rosey-cheeked Google co-founder took the stage […]






Categories: Science

The Light Might Make You Heavy

Slashdot - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 5:05pm
Rambo Tribble writes: "Writing in the American Journal of Epidemiology, researchers have found that sleeping with high ambient light levels may contribute to obesity (abstract). In a survey of 113,000 women, a high correlation was found between higher bedroom light levels and increased propensity to be overweight or obese. Excess light in the sleeping environment has long been known to adversely affect melatonin production and circadian rhythms. It is posited that such an interference with the 'body clock' may be behind these results. Although there is not yet enough evidence to call this a smoking gun, as one researcher put it, 'Overall this study points to the importance of darkness.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Space History Photo: Little Joe Launch Vehicle

Space.com - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 4:50pm
Little Joe's launch vehicle was launched for the first time on Oct. 4, 1959.
Categories: Science

First real-time movies of the light-to-current conversion in an organic solar cell

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 4:44pm
Scientists have reported the first real-time movies of the light-to-current conversion process in an organic solar cell. Researchers show that the quantum-mechanical, wavelike nature of electrons and their coupling to the nuclei is of fundamental importance for the charge transfer in an organic photovoltaic device.
Categories: Science

New clinical guidelines for cancer-related fatigue

Science Daily - Fri, 30/05/2014 - 4:44pm
Fatigue is a debilitating problem for cancer patients undergoing treatment; however, it also poses a huge detriment after treatment and can significantly affect quality of life. Approximately 30 percent of cancer patients endure persistent fatigue for several years after treatment, according to an expert panel.
Categories: Science