SES Says It Could Build the World's Most Powerful Satellite, but Won't

Space.com - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 11:43am
Global fleet operator SES says it could join the race to build the world’s highest-throughput satellites if it wanted to, but doesn’t believe such spacecraft will be effective at serving customers.
Categories: Science

Watch a NASA Rocket Create Colorful Artificial Clouds Over US East Coast Tonight!

Space.com - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 11:30am
A small NASA rocket will launch to create colorful artificial clouds on Monday night (June 12), and you can watch all the action live. Weather permitting, the launch could be visible to spectators on the U.S. East Coast from New York to North Carolina.
Categories: Science

Why Nascar's Parker Kligerman Uses Video Games to Hone His Skills

Wired News - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 11:00am
Nascar driver Parker Kligerman hones his skills with video games and high-tech simulators.
Categories: Science

How Googlers Avoid Burnout (and Secretly Boost Creativity)

Wired News - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 11:00am
You have to "turn it off" to "turn it on" when it matters most.
Categories: Science

Scientist Screwed Up? Send 'Em to Researcher Rehab

Wired News - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 11:00am
Jim DuBois is offering fallen scientists a shot at redemption. But not everyone thinks they deserve a second chance.
Categories: Science

Does Silicon Valley Need More Labor Unions?

Slashdot - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 10:22am
Salon recently talked to Jeffrey Buchanan, who two years ago co-founded a labor rights group "that highlights the plight of security officers, food-service workers, janitors and shuttle-bus drivers in the region." An anonymous reader quotes their report: The situation among Silicon Valley's low-wage contract workers has become so perilous that in January, thousands of security guards working at immensely profitable companies like Facebook and Cisco followed the shuttle-bus drivers and voted to unionize in an effort to collectively bargain for higher wages and better benefits. The upcoming labor contract negotiations between the roughly 3,000 security guards (represented by SEIU United Service Workers West) and their employers is one of the biggest developments in Silicon Valley labor organizing to happen this year. Buchanan says there's also a broader push this year to get tech companies to be proactive in ensuring these workers can make ends meet, even if these companies have to pay more for the services they procure... A paper published last year by University of California at Santa Cruz researchers Chris Brenner and Kyle Neering estimates between 19,000 and 39,000 contracted service workers are employed in the Valley at any given time... An additional 78,000 workers are at risk of becoming contract employees, according to the study, a number which includes administrative assistants, sales representatives and medium-wage computer programmers. This is part of a larger societal shift in which salaried workers are converted to contractors -- a transition that benefits business owners, in that they don't have to pay benefits and can hire and fire contractors at will. Buchanan's group represents contractors typically earning "as little as $20,000 a year." But Salon's headline argues that "programmers may be next" in the drive to organize contractors.

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Categories: Science

Linux Malware Infects Raspberry Pi Devices And Makes Them Mine Cryptocurrency

Slashdot - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 7:18am
An anonymous reader quotes Hot Hardware: If you're a Raspberry Pi user who's never changed the default password of the "pi" user, then heed this warning: change it. A brand new piece of malware has hit the web, called "Linux.MulDrop.14", and it preys on those who haven't secured their devices properly... After scanning for RPis with an open (and default) SSH port, the "pi" user is logged into (if the password is left default), and the password is subsequently changed. After that, the malware installs ZMap and sshpass software, and then it configures itself. The ultimate goal of Linux.MulDrop.14 is to make digital money for someone else, namely the author of the malware, using your Raspberry Pi.

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Categories: Science

Developer Accidentally Deletes Production Database On Their First Day On The Job

Slashdot - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 4:14am
An anonymous reader quotes Quartz: "How screwed am I?" asked a recent user on Reddit, before sharing a mortifying story. On the first day as a junior software developer at a first salaried job out of college, his or her copy-and-paste error inadvertently erased all data from the company's production database. Posting under the heartbreaking handle cscareerthrowaway567, the user wrote, "The CTO told me to leave and never come back. He also informed me that apparently legal would need to get involved due to severity of the data loss. I basically offered and pleaded to let me help in someway to redeem my self and i was told that I 'completely fucked everything up.'" The company's backups weren't working, according to the post, so the company is in big trouble now. Though Qz adds that "the court of public opinion is on the new guy's side. In a poll on the tech site the Register, less than 1% of 5,400 respondents thought the new developer should be fired. Forty-five percent thought the CTO should go."

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Categories: Science

Is the finger-stick blood test necessary for type 2 diabetes treatment?

Science Daily - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 2:21am
Blood glucose testing does not offer a significant advantage in blood sugar control or quality of life for type 2 diabetes patients who are not treated with insulin, suggests new research.
Categories: Science

Delays In Unlocking Cellphones Seized In Inauguration Day Protests?

Slashdot - Sun, 11/06/2017 - 1:10am
Cellphone data may play a key role in prosecuting people arrested at inauguration day protests, according to an article shared by Slashdot reader Mosquito Bites. A U.S. attorney acknowledged that "the government recovered cell phones from more than 100 indicted defendants and other un-indicted arrested" in a filing last March, adding "The government is in the process of extracting data from the Rioter Cell Phones pursuant to lawfully issued search warrants, and expects to be in a position to produce all of the data from the searchers Rioter Cell Phones in the next several weeks." But 11 weeks later, it's a different story. Prosecutors "have provided defense lawyers with access to hundreds of hours of video footage from January 20, but have yet to turn over data extracted from more than 100 cell phones seized during the arrests, according to lawyers who spoke with BuzzFeed News." In addition, they report that now more than half the 200-plus defendants "are vowing not to cooperate with prosecutors, even in the face of a new set of felony charges that carry stiff maximum prison sentences."

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Categories: Science

Has the 40-year Old Mystery of the 'Wow!' Signal Been Solved?

Slashdot - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 11:06pm
"Astronomers have confirmed that the Wow! signal, thought to be the most promising detection by SETI of alien life, was actually caused by a comet," writes schwit1. New Atlas reports: Last year, a group of researchers from the Center of Planetary Science proposed a new hypothesis that argued a comet might be the culprit. The frequency could be caused by the hydrogen cloud they carry, and the fact that they move accounts for why it seemingly disappeared. Two comets, named 266/P Christensen and P/2008 Y2 (Gibbs), happened to be transiting through that region of space when the Wow! signal was detected, but they weren't discovered until after 2006. To test the hypothesis, the team made 200 radio spectrum observations between November 2016 and February 2017. Sure enough, 266/P Christensen was found to emit radio waves at a frequency of 1,420 MHz, and to double check, the researchers moved their radio telescope by one degree. As expected, the signal vanished, and only returned when the telescope was trained back on the comet.

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Categories: Science

New iOS 11 Settings Will Stop Apps From Tracking Your Location

Slashdot - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 10:02pm
An anonymous reader quotes The Verge: Apple is giving users the option to enable much stricter location rules with iOS 11, according to MacRumors. The company began this effort last year by adding a new option to iOS 10 that grants apps access to your location only while they're actively being used. But this "while in use" setting is up to developers to actually enable. The vast majority of popular apps did integrate that new feature. Others, however -- Uber chief among them -- still force iPhone users to choose between always or never providing location data. The latter choice breaks the functionality of an app like Uber, leaving customers with really only one option. Apple seems poised to eliminate this false choice in iOS 11 by making the "while in use" restriction available for every app.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

A Power Outage In Silicon Valley Was Caused By A Drone Crash

Slashdot - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 8:58pm
An anonymous reader quotes the San Jose Mercury News: A drone crashed into a high-voltage wire Thursday night, causing tens of thousands of dollars in damage and knocking out power to roughly 1,600 people for about two hours, police said... "The FAA has rules and regulations in place to prevent this exact type of incident from happening," said Mountain View police spokeswoman Katie Nelson. "We simply ask that people comply with the rules and that they operate drones safely and sensibly." The town's city hall was without power -- along with the rest of the 1,600 homes -- prompting a Google software engineer to tweet that "drones are fun until someone flies one into high-voltage power lines." They added later that "apparently the owner 'fled in a white hatchback', which is the least dignified way that someone can flee, I think."

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Categories: Science

That Time Adam West, TV's 'Batman', Also Advocated For Videogames

Slashdot - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 7:57pm
Adam West, star of the 1960s TV series Batman, has died at age 88. An anonymous reader shares a memory of that time the 53-year-old actor wrote an op-ed for a 1982 issue of Videogame and Computer Gaming Illustrated. "I've been playing with computers longer than most," West wrote on page 6. [PDF] "I had onboard computers in Robinson Crusoe on Mars, having learned in an episode of TV's The Outer Limits that you can't survive on the Red Planet without them. Then, of course, I was up to my cowl in computers as television's Batman... In 1966, when the series began its three season run, all of that was science fiction. Computers were playthings of the researchers at MIT... Today, a lot of the apparatus we had in Batman -- dressed, of course, in less imposing names -- is fact. And we're lucky this is so." West called videogames "an ideal means to broaden the imaginations of young people," saying the medium "can expand our awareness of the world as it is, was, or might be. The medium is still in its infancy, but read this again in a few years and see if this prediction hasn't come true: as videogaming grows, we will grow." My favorite story is how West was cast as Batman after the show's producer spotted his performance as super-spy Agent Q in a commercial for Nestle Quik. And CNN also remembers that "later in life, West made appearances on the animated series 'Family Guy' as Mayor Adam West, the oddball leader of Quahog, Rhode Island."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Adam West: Batman Forever

Wired News - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 6:59pm
No actor ever managed to make the Dark Knight as delightful as the legendary actor.
Categories: Science

Docker's LinuxKit Launches Kernel Security Efforts, Including Next-Generation VPN

Slashdot - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 6:48pm
darthcamaro writes: Back in April, when Docker announced its LinuxKit effort, the primary focus appeared to just be [tools for] building a container-optimized Linux distribution. As it turns out, security is also a core focus -- with LinuxKit now incubating multiple efforts to help boost Linux kernel security. Among those efforts is the Wireguard next generation VPN that could one day replace IPsec. "Wireguard is a new VPN for Linux using the cryptography that is behind some of the really good secure messaging apps like Signal," said Nathan McCauley, Director of Security at Docker Inc. According to the article, Docker also has several full-time employees looking at ways to reduce the risk of memory corruption in the kernel, and is also developing a new Linux Security Module with more flexible access control policies for processes.

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Categories: Science

Toxicants linked to lipid metabolism

Science Daily - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 5:48pm
New research on water fleas demonstrates how certain toxicants can affect development and progression to reproductive maturity.
Categories: Science

Potential mechanism for BCG vaccine reversal of type 1 diabetes

Science Daily - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 5:48pm
Interim results from a FDA-approved clinical trial testing the generic vaccine bacillus Calmette-Guérin to reverse advanced type 1 diabetes demonstrate a potential new mechanism by which the BCG vaccine may restore the proper immune response to the insulin-secreting islet cells of the pancreas.
Categories: Science

Transformer-like carbon nanostructure engineered

Science Daily - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 5:48pm
A research team has engineered a new type of carbon nanomaterials, capable of changing shapes and colors depending on the type of solvents used.
Categories: Science

Cancer Drug Proves To Be Effective Against Multiple Tumors

Slashdot - Sat, 10/06/2017 - 5:42pm
An anonymous reader writes: 86 cancer patients were enrolled in a trial of a drug that helps the immune system attack tumors. Though they had different kinds of tumor -- pancreas, prostate, uterus or bone -- they all shared a genetic mutation that disrupts their cells' ability to fix damaged DNA, found in 4% of all cancer patients. But tumors vanished and didn't return for 18 patients in the study, reports the New York Times, while 66 more patients "had their tumors shrink substantially and stabilize, instead of continuing to grow." The drug trial results were "so striking that the Food and Drug Administration already has approved the drug, pembrolizumab, brand name Keytruda, for patients whose cancers arise from the same genetic abnormality. It is the first time a drug has been approved for use against tumors that share a certain genetic profile, whatever their location in the body." The researchers say that just in the U.S. there are 60,000 new patients every year who could benefit from the new drug.

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Categories: Science