Developing knowledge of blowfly life cycles to improve accuracy of estimating post-mortem interval

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:40pm
Post-mortems are an essential part of the investigative process after someone has died in suspicious circumstances, usually performed to establish cause of death. Definitively proving time of death later is extremely difficult. By using blowflies and sometimes other insects, forensic entomologists can provide an estimated window of time in which someone is likely to have died. This is calculated by estimating the amount of time since eggs were first laid, which approximates (sometimes quite closely) the time of death. Such insect derived time is known as the minimum post-mortem interval (PMImin).
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Supporting a caring and creative culture for hospital patients and staff through 'Being Human'

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:40pm
Going into hospital, whether unexpectedly or planned, can be a very difficult time for patients and their families. Care and support from hospital staff can make a huge difference to their experiences, but when staff face increasing demands on their time, this is not always easy to deliver.
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Combating iron in the brain: Researchers find anti-aging micromolecule

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:40pm
The older we get, the more our brain ages. Cognitive abilities decline and the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases like dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease or having a stroke steadily increases. A possible cause is the accumulation of iron molecules within neurons, which seems to be valid for all vertebrates. In a collaborative research project, scientists found that this iron accumulation is linked to a microRNA called miR-29.
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Children of patients with C9orf72 mutations are at a greater risk of frontotemporal dementia or ALS at a younger age

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:40pm
The most common genetic cause of the brain diseases frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a mutation in the C9orf72 gene. Researchers have demonstrated that if an affected parent passes on this mutation, the children will be affected at a younger age (than the parent). There are no indications that the disease progresses more quickly.
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Norwegian ice cap 'exceptionally sensitive' to climate change

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:40pm
How will future climate change affect our glaciers? By looking into the past 4000 years, a new study finds an ice cap in southern Norway to be ‘exceptionally sensitive’ to climate change.
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Reactive lignin for reducing the environmental impacts of wood products

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:40pm
Technology known as "CatLignin" has been created to produce reactive lignin from pulp industry side streams to be used as a replacement for toxic phenol compounds in wood adhesives that are widely used in wood products and furniture.
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Skype Gets A New Competitor: Amazon Announces Chime

Slashdot - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:40pm
Amazon has released new service to make voice and video calls and share screen. Called Chime, the service is aimed at business users. It directly competes with well-known players such as Skype, Google Hangouts, GoToMeeting, Zoom, and Cisco's WebEx, among others. From a report: Amazon Web Services today unveiled Chime, a new service that it says takes the "frustration out of meetings" by delivering video, voice, chat, and screen sharing. Instead of forcing participants to call one another on a dedicated line, Amazon Chime automatically calls all participants at the start of a meeting, so "joining a meeting is as easy as clicking a button in the app, no PIN required," the company said in a press release. Chime also shows a visual roster of participants, and allows participants to pinpoint who exactly on the call is creating annoying background noise.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Genes in albino orchids may hold clues to parasitic mechanism used by non-photosynthetic plants

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:37pm
How do plants give up photosynthesis and become parasites? A research team is using comprehensive analysis of gene expression in albino and green orchids to investigate the evolution of parasitic plants.
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New RNAi treatment targets eye inflammation

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:37pm
Scientists have developed a new RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutic agent that safely blocked ocular inflammation in mice, potentially making it a new treatment for human uveitis and diabetic retinopathy.
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New peptide hormone aids waterproof barrier formation in plant roots

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:37pm
Researchers have identified peptide hormones needed for formation and maintenance of plant root barrier to preserve ion homeostasis and adapt to harsh soil conditions.
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Estrogen explains the exosome-carried messenger profile in the circulation among postmenopausal women

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:37pm
In blood circulation, the exosome-carried messenger molecule profile differs between post- and premenopausal women, research shows. The differences were associated with circulating estrogen and cholesterol levels as well as body composition and other health indicators. These findings enable using the studied molecules in the evaluation of health status.
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Millions Need the Broadband Program the FCC Just Put on Hold

Wired News - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:30pm
The FCC's new chairman says the program is overrun with waste and abuse. In the meantime, kids are going to McDonald's to get their homework done. The post Millions Need the Broadband Program the FCC Just Put on Hold appeared first on WIRED.
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How ticks protect themselves from Lyme bacteria and other microbes

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:27pm
For hundreds of millions of years, ticks have survived on Earth by sucking blood from their victims for days, often leaving behind terrible diseases as a thank-you note. But no one has ever looked at why ticks, themselves, are able to survive while harboring bacteria, viruses and parasites. Now, for the first time, scientists have decoded how the ingenious tick immune system fights a myriad of microbes.
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Do children inherit drug protection from parents exposed to nicotine or drugs?

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:27pm
A father's nicotine use may have a significant impact on children's risk of some diseases. In a study published in the online biomedical sciences journal eLife, Oliver J. Rando, MD, PhD, and colleagues at UMass Medical School, demonstrate that mice born of fathers who are habitually exposed to nicotine inherit enhanced chemical tolerance and drug clearance abilities.
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To please your friends, tell them what they already know

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:27pm
We love to tell friends and family about experiences we've had and they haven't -- from exotic vacations to celebrity sightings -- but new research suggests that these stories don't thrill them quite as much as we imagine. A series of studies shows that both speakers and listeners expect novel stories to be bigger crowd pleasers, but that listeners end up enjoying familiar stories more.
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Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:27pm
Researchers have developed a magnetic drug implant -- the first of its kind in Canada -- that could offer an alternative for patients struggling with numerous pills or intravenous injections.
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How the brain maintains useful memories

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:26pm
Researchers have discovered a reason why we often struggle to remember the smaller details of past experiences.
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Avoiding medications that promote weight gain when managing obesity

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:26pm
While diet, exercise and behavior modification are essential components of obesity management, a successful long-term weight loss strategy should also include avoiding or minimizing medication-related weight gain, according to a new report.
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Measuring entropy: Scanning-tunneling microscope gives glimpse of the mysterious property

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:26pm
The scanning-tunneling microscope (STM), which is used to study changes in the shape of a single molecule at the atomic scale, impacts the ability of that molecule to make these changes, researchers have found.
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Population density pushes the 'slow life'

Science Daily - Tue, 14/02/2017 - 2:26pm
One psychological effect of population density is for those people living in urban areas to adopt a 'slow life strategy.' This strategy focuses more on planning for the long-term future and includes tactics like preferring long-term romantic relationships, having fewer children and investing more in education.
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