The first-in-human clinical trial targeting Alzheimer's tau protein

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 3:11pm
For the first time, targeting the other feature of Alzheimer's disease, tau, has given fruitful results. In an unprecedented study, active vaccination in humans has resulted in a favorable immune response in 29 out of the 30 patients with only minor side effects.
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The song of silence: Innate mechanism for birds hearing their own species is based on the silence

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 3:10pm
Neurons in zebra finch brains operate as a barcode reader to detect songs of the same species during learning, report scientists.
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Researchers' discovery of new verbal working memory architecture has implications for artificial intelligence

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 2:57pm
The neural structure we use to store and process information in verbal working memory is more complex than previously understood--a discovery that has implications for the creation of artificial intelligence (AI) systems, such as speech translation tools.
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Dual loss of TET proteins prompts lethal upsurge in inflammatory T cells in a mouse model of lymphoid cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 2:57pm
Members of the TET family of proteins help protect against cancer by regulating the chemical state of DNA --and thus turning growth-promoting genes on or off. These latest findings illustrate just how important TET proteins are in controlling cell proliferation and cell fate.
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How hearing loss can change the way nerve cells are wired

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 2:57pm
Even short-term blockages in hearing can lead to remarkable changes in the auditory system, altering the behavior and structure of nerve cells that relay information from the ear to the brain, according to a new study.
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Men should avoid rock music when playing board games, say scientists

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 2:53pm
Mozart may enhance a man's performance in board games - while AC/DC may hinder their chances, according to new research.
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Microsoft Says More People Are Switching From Macs To Surface Than Ever Before

Slashdot - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 2:45pm
Microsoft has been targeting Mac users with its Surface commercials recently, and it appears they might be paying off. From a report on The Verge: The software giant claims that November was the "best month ever for consumer Surface sales," following a number of Black Friday deals on the Surface Pro 4. Microsoft still isn't providing sales numbers, but the company claims "more people are switching from Macs to Surface than ever before." Microsoft cites "the disappointment of the new MacBook Pro" and its trade-in program for MacBooks for tempting people to switch to Surface. Again, Microsoft refuses to provide numbers but vaguely claims "our trade-in program for MacBooks was our best ever."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Why plants eat feces when they could eat flesh

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 2:42pm
What drives a carnivorous plant to abandon eating meat in favor of a diet of bat feces? Ecologists believe they have the answer. Their ingenious study sheds new light on the evolution of mutualism.
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NASA Aborts Hurricane Satellite Constellation Launch Over Pump Glitch

Space.com - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 2:25pm
NASA aborted the planned launch of an eight-satellite fleet for hurricane monitoring on Monday (Dec. 12) due to problems with its launch system, agency officials said in a mission update.
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Grand Tour 'Most Illegally Downloaded TV Show In History'

Slashdot - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 2:05pm
Jeremy Clarkson's new motoring show has become the most illegally downloaded television programme in history, figures suggest. Amazon paid a reported $160 million for three series of The Grand Tour, which stars former Top Gear presenters Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May, after Clarkson was sacked by the BBC in March 2015. From a report on The Guardian: But figures from Muso, data analysts of the piracy market, suggest unprecedented numbers of people are avoiding paying $90 a year to sign up for Amazon's online streaming service, Amazon Prime, and instead downloading the show illegally. The data, shared with the Mail on Sunday, suggests the first episode was downloaded illegally 7.9m times, the second 6.4m times and the third 4.6m times. British viewers made up the largest percentage (13.7%) of the total number of illegal downloads.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Inside Nike’s Quest for the Impossible: a Two-Hour Marathon

Wired News - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 2:01pm
The first in a series of stories behind the scenes of the shoe company's plan to beat a long-unbreakable record. The post Inside Nike’s Quest for the Impossible: a Two-Hour Marathon appeared first on WIRED.
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High school football players, 1956-1970, did not have increase of neurodegenerative diseases

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 1:49pm
Varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports, new research concludes.
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What else comes with a college degree? An extra 10 pounds, says new study

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 1:49pm
College students gained an average of 10 pounds over the course of their college years, a study has found, and number of students who were overweight or obese increased 78 percent. The extra weight translates to a variety of increased health risks, the study says.
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Mountain glaciers are showing some of the strongest responses to climate change

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 1:49pm
Mountain glaciers move slowly and it has been hard to pin an individual glacier's retreat to a change in global climate. A new method finds that for most of the glaciers studied, the observed retreat is more than 99 percent likely due to climate change.
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Scientist pioneers novel ways to study endangered baleen whales

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 1:49pm
Baleen whales store a wide range of hormonal data that can help chart a female whale’s reproductive history–data which researchers hope can be used to help repopulate them.
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Squid and chips anyone?

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 1:46pm
Great British fish suppers could become more like those enjoyed in Spain and Portugal, according to new data.
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How skills learnt from sport can help homeless young people

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 1:46pm
Mental skills training developed in sport can help homeless young people engage with education, training and work opportunities.
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The loneliness of the individual athlete

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 1:46pm
Athletes in individual sports are more prone to developing depressive symptoms than athletes in team sports.
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Reindeer left hungry, shrinking in warming world

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 1:46pm
Often portrayed as pulling Santa's sleigh, reindeer are a Christmas staple. Now, ecologists have found that reindeer are shrinking due to the impact of climate change on their food supplies.
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Blood pressure medication paves the way for approaches to managing Barrett's syndrome

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 1:46pm
New ways of using mechanisms behind certain blood pressure medications may, in the future, spare some patient groups both discomfort and lifelong concern over cancer of the esophagus.
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