An 'Edgy' Suggestion on Where to Watch the Total Solar Eclipse

Space.com - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 11:42am
There are good reasons to watch the 2017 total solar eclipse at the edge of the moon’s shadow rather than the center of the "path of totality."
Categories: Science

'We Don't Planet' Episode 5: The Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram

Space.com - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 11:30am
The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram allows astronomers to map out the complete life history of a star. Learn all about this famous diagram in the fifth episode of "We Don't Planet."
Categories: Science

For Modern Astronomers, It’s Learn to Code or Get Left Behind

Wired News - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 11:00am
Fledgling astronomers still don't take meaningful courses in modern coding, data science, or their best practices. The post For Modern Astronomers, It’s Learn to Code or Get Left Behind appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Minutiae: The Curious App That Captures Your Unfiltered Life

Wired News - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 11:00am
Think of it like the anti-Instagram. The post Minutiae: The Curious App That Captures Your Unfiltered Life appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

This Entrepreneur A/B Tested Her Clothes to Combat Sexism

Wired News - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 11:00am
How kick-ass pants, a calculated stare (and a LOT of hard work) disarmed sexist investors and helped Kathryn Minshew built a successful company. The post This Entrepreneur A/B Tested Her Clothes to Combat Sexism appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Want Efficient Energy? Try Carbon Dioxide-Powered Turbines

Wired News - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 11:00am
Supercritical carbon dioxide is super hot, super dense, and super good at turning heat into electricity. The post Want Efficient Energy? Try Carbon Dioxide-Powered Turbines appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Scientists Develop Technology That Burns Natural Gas With No CO2 Emissions

Slashdot - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 10:00am
New submitter Ben Sullivan writes: Researchers and engineers in Vienna have developed a way to burn natural gas without releasing CO2 into the air through a combustion method called chemical looping combustion (CLC). In this process, CO2 can be isolated during combustion without having to use any additional energy, which means it can then go on to be stored. The method had already been applied successfully in a test environment, and has now been upscaled to allow use in up to a 10 MW facility. ScienceBlog.com reports: "A granulate made of metal oxide circulates between the two chambers and is responsible for transporting oxygen from air to fuel: 'We pump air through one chamber, where the particles take up oxygen. They then move on to the second chamber, which has natural gas flowing through it. Here is where the oxygen is released, and then where flameless combustion takes place, producing CO2 and water vapor,' explains Stefan Penthor from the Institute of Chemical Engineering at TU Wien. The separation into two chambers means there are two separate flue gas streams to deal with too: air with a reduced concentration of oxygen is discharged from one chamber, water vapor and CO2 from the other. The water vapor can be separated quite easily, leaving almost pure CO2, which can be stored or used in other technical applications."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

NASA Sun Observatory Sees Partial Solar Eclipse in Space

Space.com - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 9:45am
NASA's powerful Solar Dynamics Observatory may seem to have a boring job: staring at the sun as a space weather sentinel. But every now and then, the observatory gets a lunar surprise to break up the routine.
Categories: Science

Juno Spacecraft Reveals Spectacular Cyclones At Jupiter's Poles

Slashdot - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 7:00am
Joe Palca reports via NPR: NASA's Juno spacecraft has spotted giant cyclones swirling at Jupiter's north and south poles. That's just one of the unexpected and puzzling findings being reported by the Juno science team. Juno arrived at Jupiter last summer. It's the first spacecraft to get a close-up look at the planet's poles. It's in an orbit that takes it skimming close to the cloud tops of the gas giant once every 53 days. After each close pass, the spacecraft sends a trove of data back to Earth. Ultimately, scientists will want to understand how these cyclones change over time and whether they form differently in the north and south poles. Another puzzle that Juno is supposed to help solve is whether Jupiter, a gas giant, has a solid core. Another surprise from Juno is the concentration of ammonia in Jupiter's atmosphere. Scientists thought ammonia was most likely distributed evenly throughout the atmosphere. The data show there's more ammonia near the equator than there is at other latitudes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

How to See the Best Meteor Showers of 2017

Space.com - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 6:00am
This summer, try and catch one of the night sky's most spectacular and accessible shows — a meteor shower.
Categories: Science

Citizen Scientists Identify Prehistoric Supernova

Space.com - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 6:00am
Over 700 volunteer citizen scientists have helped identify more than 30,000 celestial objects, including a star explosion that occurred 970 million years ago, hundreds of millions of years before dinosaurs emerged on Earth.
Categories: Science

Do robots creep you out?

Kurzweil AI - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 4:45am

Which of these presentation methods make the robot look most real: live, VR, 3D TV, or 2D TV? (credit: Constanze Schreiner/University of Koblenz-Landau, Martina Mara/Ars Electronica Futuerlab, and Markus Appel/ University of Wurzburg)

How do you make humanoid robots look least creepy? With increasing use of industrial (and soon, service robots), it’s a good question.

Researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau, University of Wurzburg, and Arts Electronica Futurelab decided to find out with an experiment. They created a skit with a human actor and the Roboy robot, and presented scripted human-robot interactions (HRIs), using four types of presentations: live, virtual reality (VR), 3D TV, and 2D TV. Participants saw Roboy assisting the human in organizing appointments, conducting web searches, and finding a birthday present for the human’s mother.

People who watched live interactions with the robot were most likely to consider the robot as real, followed by viewing the same interaction via VR. Robots presented in VR also scored high in human likeness, but lower than in the live presentation.

The researchers will present their findings at the 67th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association in San Diego, CA, May 25–29, 2017.

 

Categories: Science

Chinese Company Offers Free Training For US Coal Miners To Become Wind Farmers

Slashdot - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 3:30am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Quartz: If you want to truly understand what's happening in the energy industry, the best thing to do is to travel deep into the heart of American coal country, to Carbon County, Wyoming (yes, that's a real place). The state produces most coal in the US, and Carbon County has long been known (and was named) for its extensive coal deposits. But the state's mines have been shuttering over the past few years, causing hundreds of people to lose their jobs in 2016 alone. Now, these coal miners are finding hope, offered from an unlikely place: a Chinese wind-turbine maker wants to retrain these American workers to become wind-farm technicians. It's the perfect metaphor for the massive shift happening in the global energy markets. The news comes from an energy conference in Wyoming, where the American arm of Goldwind, a Chinese wind-turbine manufacturer, announced the free training program. More than a century ago, Carbon County was home to the first coal mine in Wyoming. Soon, it will be the site of a new wind farm with hundreds of Goldwind-supplied turbines.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Mark Zuckerberg Should Really Listen to Himself

Wired News - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 2:27am
Oh, the places he could go! The post Mark Zuckerberg Should Really Listen to Himself appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

US Senator Introduces the First Bill To Give Gig Workers Benefits

Slashdot - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 1:45am
Virginia Senator Mark Warner has introduced a bill that will give basic benefits to gig workers. "Warner has just proposed the first-ever piece of national legislation aimed at helping on-demand and other non-traditional workers without traditional benefits, like paid sick days or a retirement plan, have some sort of a safety net," reports TechCrunch. "The bill asks the federal government to set aside $20 million in funding for organizations to use to look at the types of benefits programs individual workers could take with them from job to job." From the report: "[Portable benefits is] that emergency fund," Warner told BuzzFeed, which first reported news of the bill. "It might be a fund to take care of a disability if you get hurt. It might work with some existing retirement programs. Part of it would be, depending on what happens with Obamacare, an ability to help deal with health care expenses. I think there will be a variety of models." The funding wouldn't be enough to cover everyone, of course, but if it gets the green light a draft of the bill indicates it would earmark $5 million toward grants doled out by Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta for organizations already looking into portable benefits and $15 million for new programs.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Amazon's Drive-Up Grocery Stores Are Now Open To the Public In Seattle

Slashdot - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 1:15am
Amazon has opened two drive-up grocery stores to the public that will allow Amazon Prime subscribers to place an online order and choose a two-hour pickup window for when they'd like to drive over and retrieve it. The Verge reports: Despite the stores being called "AmazonFresh Pickup," a membership to the company's home delivery grocery service isn't required. But if you do pay for AmazonFresh (an extra $14.99 per month on top of Prime's usual cost), your groceries will be ready within 15 minutes. Regular Prime customers have to wait at least two hours before the earliest pickup window becomes available. According to The Seattle Times, the first time you visit one of the two AmazonFresh Pickup locations, a concierge will enter your name and vehicle's license plate number into Amazon's systems. That way, during subsequent visits a license plate reader will automatically identify you and signal to employees that they should bring your order out to your car. The Times notes that this license plate scanning can be disabled from Amazon's website.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

More Than Half of Streaming Users In US Are Sharing Their Passwords, Says Report

Slashdot - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 12:45am
A new study conducted by Fluent shows a majority of Americans are sharing passwords to their streaming video services. While millennials lead the pack, non-millennials are doing the same. Streaming Observer reports: Nearly 3 out of every 4 (72% exactly) Americans who have cable also have access to at least one streaming service and 8% of cable subscribers plan to eliminate their service in the next year. But that doesn't necessarily mean they're paying for their streaming service. New numbers from a study conducted by Fluent show that the majority of Americans are sharing passwords to their streaming video services. Well over half of millennials (aged 18-34) -- 60% -- are either using someone someone else's password or giving their password to someone else. And just under half -- 48% -- of non-millennials are doing the same. The study also revealed that the main factor in what drives consumers to sign up for streaming video services is price, with 34% of Americans saying that low cost was the primary factor. That number jumps to 38% among millennials. When you take in to account that some streaming TV services start with prices as low as $20, it makes sense that price is the biggest issue. Convenience was the next biggest factor, coming in at just below 25%.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Facebook's Instant Articles Platform To Support Google AMP, Apple News

Slashdot - Fri, 26/05/2017 - 12:05am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: One of the problems publishers face today in making their content more readable on mobile devices is that there are multiple, competing formats available for this purpose. Facebook has Instant Articles, Google is spearheading the AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) project, and the Apple News Format optimizes content for iOS devices. Facebook is today taking a crack at a solution to this problem by rolling out support for both AMP and soon Apple News as a part of its open source Instant Articles software development kit. The updated SDK will now include an extension that lets publishers build content that's publishable in all three formats, beginning with support for Google's AMP in addition to Facebook's own Instant Articles. In the weeks ahead it will also include support for publishing to Apple News, though the company didn't provide an exact launch date for when that feature would be added.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Fruit flies journey to International Space Station to study effects of zero gravity on the heart

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 11:55pm
Researchers have announced that six boxes of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) will travel to the International Space Station (ISS) to study the impact of weightlessness on the heart. The fruit flies are scheduled to launch on June 1, 2017, from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center and will travel to the ISS via a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft.
Categories: Science

'Authentic' teachers are better at engaging with their students

Science Daily - Thu, 25/05/2017 - 11:55pm
Teachers who have an authentic teaching style are more positively received by their students, according to new research.
Categories: Science