New treatment options for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:01pm
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most frequent liver diseases worldwide. The underlying causes involve obesity and decreased physical activity leading to accompanying metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Currently no approved pharmacotherapy is available. Therefore, the aim of a new joint research initiative is to employ a novel and applicable lifestyle intervention that is feasible and exerts a lasting benefit.
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Cryptococcal meningitis should be classified as a 'neglected tropical disease,' researchers say

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:01pm
Crytococcal meningitis is a deadly invasive fungal infection which affects hundreds of thousands of HIV patients in the late stage of their disease every year.
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Secret to cell size found in group underpinning world’s biggest food producer

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:00pm
A gene controlling cell size has been identified in a microalgal group which underpins a fifth of the world’s food chains.
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New chromium-based superconductor has an unusual electronic state

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:00pm
When certain materials are cooled below a critical temperature they become superconductors, with zero electrical resistance. An international research team observed an unusual electronic state in new superconductor chromium arsenide. This finding could prove useful in future superconductor research and material design.
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Possible treatment for deadly weight loss

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:00pm
Many cancer patients are susceptible to potentially lethal weight loss. Now researchers understand better why this happens, and perhaps how to prevent the condition.
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Large single-crystal graphene is possible, say scientists

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:00pm
The target of large, cheap and quick graphene synthesis has been achieved, report researchers in a new article.
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The Perfect Comic to Honor Jack Kirby's 100th Birthday

Wired News - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:00pm
Jack Kirby created scores of famous heroes, but the best way to honor him is this reboot of one of his lesser-known characters.
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Humanscale, the Classic Design Tool, Gets a Second Life

Wired News - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:00pm
The set of nine rotating disks shows how to design objects for people, using more than 60,000 data points.
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How on Earth Did Aaron Judge Bean That Stadium Roof? Physics!

Wired News - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:00pm
Stadiums are designed by engineers so that balls won't hit them—but physics finds a way.
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German Automakers Formed a Secret Cartel In the '90s To Collude On Diesel Emissions, Says Report

Slashdot - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 1:00pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Last week, Der Spiegel published an explosive report alleging that the major German automakers formed a secret cartel in the 1990s to collude on diesel emissions. These companies, including Volkswagen, Audi, BMW, Porsche, and Daimler, met in secret working groups to discuss "the technology, costs, suppliers, and even the exhaust gas purification of its diesel vehicles," the German weekly reported. The meetings were disclosed to German competition officials in letters from VW and Daimler and viewed by Der Spiegel. The secret meetings "laid the basis" for the 2015 diesel emission cheating scandal, in which VW was caught installing secret software in more than half a million vehicles sold in the US that it used to fool exhaust emissions tests. The admission of cheating ultimately cost the automaker tens of billions of dollars in fines and legal fees, making it one of the most expensive corporate scandals in history. Years earlier, VW participated in dozens of secret meetings with its competitors, involving over 200 employees in up to 60 working groups, on how to meet increasingly tough emissions criteria in diesel vehicles. The automakers may have colluded to fix prices of a diesel emission treatment called AdBlue through these working groups, Der Spiegel says. Specifically, VW (which owns Porsche and Audi), Daimler (which owns Mercedes-Benz and Smart), and BMW allegedly agreed to use AdBlue tanks that were too small. AdBlue is a liquid solution used to counteract a vehicle's emissions.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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New strategy to design mechano-responsive luminescent materials

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:59pm
Crystals made from gold complexes change color as they change structure from “chiral” to “achiral” when ground, report researchers.
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Humans imitate in unique ways: Comparing children and bonobos

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:59pm
A new study compared children's capacity to imitate behavior with the same capacity of humans' closest living great ape relatives, the bonobos. The study found that bonobos do not copy actions as children do, which highlights the unique nature of human imitation.
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Violent sleep patterns, stress hormones change after a violent crime in the neighborhood

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:59pm
Violent crime changes youth's sleep patterns the night immediately following the crime and changes patterns of the stress hormone cortisol the following day, new research shows. Both may then disrupt academic performance in students.
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Dragonfly brains predict the path of their prey

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:37pm
New research has shown how a dragonfly's brain anticipates the movement of its prey, enabling it to hunt successfully. This knowledge could lead to innovations in fields such as robot vision.
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Pattern of marijuana use during adolescence may impact psychosocial outcomes in adulthood

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:36pm
A pattern of escalating marijuana use in adolescents is linked to higher rates of depression and lower educational accomplishments in adulthood.
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Ingestible drug-delivery materials may help patients comply with treatment regimens

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:36pm
To ensure patients receive full medicinal treatments, engineers have developed a new set of hydrogel-based drug delivery materials, which can live in the stomach up to nine days, slowly releasing medication.
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People living in rural households have lower risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:36pm
Living in rural households decreases a person's risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease, particularly for young children and adolescents, according to a new study.
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Clues to healing spinal cord injuries

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:36pm
Fresh insights into how zebrafish repair their nerve connections could hold clues to new therapies for people with spinal cord injuries. Researchers have pinpointed key molecules that prompt damaged nerve fibers in the fish to regenerate themselves.
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Thousands of genes exchanged within microbial communities living on cheese

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:36pm
Using cheese as a novel way to study microscopic communities, researchers have found that bacteria living on artisanal cheese varieties have transferred thousands of genes between each other. They also identified regional hotspots where such exchanges take place.
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Toddlers begin learning rules of reading, writing at very early age, study finds

Science Daily - Tue, 25/07/2017 - 12:36pm
New research suggests that children as young as 3 already are beginning to recognize and follow important rules and patterns governing how letters in the English language fit together to make words.
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