Online media use shows strong genetic influence

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 8:14pm
Online media use such as social networking and gaming could be strongly influenced by our genes, according to a new study.
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Lab charts the anatomy of three molecular channels

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 8:14pm
By determining the three-dimensional structures of these molecules down to the level of atoms, the researchers have unlocked key details as to how they function in the body.
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Google Voice Update Makes Google’s Messaging Strategy More Confusing

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 8:14pm
Good news for Voice users, more head-scratching for the rest of us. The post Google Voice Update Makes Google's Messaging Strategy More Confusing appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Bioinvasion is jeopardizing Mediterranean marine communities

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 8:13pm
Non-indigenous species are harming indigenous species and habitats in the Mediterranean Sea, impairing potentially exploitable marine resources and raising concern about human health issues, according to a new study.
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Google Voice Receives First Update in Five Years

Slashdot - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 8:00pm
Google Voice hasn't seen a lot of love or attention since it launched with some fanfare in 2009, but surprisingly Google wants people to know that it still cares about the communication app. In a new sprawling release -- the first of its kind in years -- Google has revamped all versions of its Voice app and site with a clean, modern look, new features, and, perhaps the best news of all, the promise of regular updates. From a report: Google is finally adding two features Google Voice users have long missed out on: MMS support for photo messaging and group chats. Previously workarounds were required to send and receive picture messages, and group chats were flat out not possible.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Arctic melt ponds form when meltwater clogs ice pores

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 7:52pm
A team of researchers, including a mathematician, has determined how Arctic melt ponds form, solving a paradoxical mystery of how a pool of water actually sits atop highly porous ice.
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80-million-year-old dinosaur collagen confirmed

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 7:52pm
Utilizing the most rigorous testing methods to date, researchers have isolated additional collagen peptides from an 80-million-year-old Brachylophosaurus.
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Princess Leia Gave the Women’s March a New Hope

Wired News - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 7:37pm
Princess Leia iconography was seen at many women's marches this weekend. The post Princess Leia Gave the Women's March a New Hope appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Alexa and Google Assistant Have a Problem: People Aren't Sticking With Voice Apps They Try

Slashdot - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 7:20pm
Amazon Echo and Google Home were the breakaway hits of the holiday shopping season. But both devices -- and the voice technologies that power them -- have some major hurdles to overcome if they want to keep both consumers and software developers engaged. From a report on Recode: That's one of the big takeaways from a new report that an industry startup, VoiceLabs, released on Monday. For starters, 69 percent of the 7,000-plus Alexa "Skills" -- voice apps, if you will -- have zero or one customer review, signaling low usage. What's more, when developers for Alexa and its competitor, Google Assistant, do get someone to enable a voice app, there's only a 3 percent chance, on average, that the person will be an active user by week 2, according to the report. (There are outliers that have week 2 retention rates of more than 20 percent.) For comparison's sake, Android and iOS apps have average retention rates of 13 percent and 11 percent, respectively, one week after first use. "There are lots of [voice] apps out there, but they are zombie apps," VoiceLabs co-founder Adam Marchick said in an interview.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

China Cracks Down On International VPN Usage

Slashdot - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 6:40pm
An anonymous reader writes: China's government has announced a 14-month crackdown on the use of unauthorised Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), commonly used by visitors and native activists, amongst others, to communicate with the world beyond the Great Firewall of China. Sunday's announcement [Chinese] from the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology reiterated regulations first outlined in 2002, but which have since been subject to sparse, selective or lenient enforcement. The new announcement promises a 'clean up' regarding the VPN situation in China, beginning immediately and running until March of 2018.

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Tumor-suppressing protein actually promotes cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 6:37pm
The protein PHLDB3, thought to be a potential tumor suppressor, actually allows cancer cells to thrive in pancreatic, prostate, colon, breast, lung, and other common cancers, researchers have found. The discovery could explain how cancer is able to overcome p53 -- a key tumor-suppressing protein.
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Astronomers find seven dwarf-galaxy groups, the building blocks of massive galaxies

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 6:36pm
A team of astronomers has discovered seven distinct groups of dwarf galaxies with just the right starting conditions to eventually merge and form larger galaxies, including spiral galaxies like the Milky Way.
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Clinical trial testing new technique to treat life-threatening ventricular tachycardia

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 6:36pm
A landmark clinical trial is evaluating a new procedure to treat a life-threatening heart rhythm disorder called ventricular tachycardia.
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When Their Shifts End, Uber Drivers Set Up Camp in Parking Lots Across the US

Slashdot - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 6:00pm
A feature report on Bloomberg today illustrates the lives of several Uber drivers, who find shelter in car parking at nights when it's too pricey and tiring to go home. An excerpt from the story: In Chicago, Walter Laquian Howard sleeps most nights at the "Uber Terminal." "I left my job thinking this would work, and it's getting harder and harder," Howard said. "They have to understand that some of us have decided to make this a full-time career." Howard has been parking and sleeping at the 7-Eleven four to five nights a week since March 2015, when he began leasing a car from Uber and needed to work more hours to make his minimum payments. Now that it's gotten cold, he wakes up every three hours to turn on the heater. He's rarely alone. Most nights, two to three other ride-hailing drivers sleep in cars parked next to his. It's safe, he said, and the employees let the drivers use the restroom. Howard has gotten to know the convenience store's staff -- Daddy-O and Uncle Mike -- over the past two years while driving for this global ride-hailing gargantuan, valued at $69 billion. "These guys have become my extended family," said Howard, 53. "It's my second home. We have this joke that I'm the resident. I keep asking them: 'Hey, did my mail come in yet?'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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A gene's journey from covert to celebrated

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 5:56pm
Unmasking a previously misunderstood gene, scientists discover an unlikely potential drug target for gastrointestinal cancers.
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Microscopic submarines for your stomach

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 5:55pm
Tiny 'submarines' that speed independently through the stomach, use gastric acid for fuel (while rapidly neutralizing it), and release their cargo precisely at the desired pH: Though it may sound like science fiction, this is a new method for treating stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs. The technique is based on proton-driven micromotors with a pH-dependent polymer coating that can be loaded with drugs.
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Living environment a powerful factor in the lives of Rwanda's orphans

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 5:55pm
A population study establishes that orphanages are important for Rwanda's orphans mainly because of lower stigma and marginalization they faced from the community. Children in orphanages are emotionally healthier, suffer less from mental distress and are less prone to high-risk behavior than orphans living under other circumstances.
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A new index for the diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 5:55pm
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become a global epidemic. There is not only a great interest worldwide to understand the causes and consequences of fatty liver disease, but also to diagnose fatty liver disease at an early stage. Researchers have now generated a new index from clinical data which can predict the presence of fatty liver disease with high accuracy.
Categories: Science

How do people choose what plants to use?

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 5:55pm
There are about 400,000 species of plants in the world. Humans use approximately 10-15% of them to cover our basic needs, such as food, medicine and shelter, as well as other needs, such as recreation, art, and craft. But why and how have humans selected only a small fraction of all plants to utilize?
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World still 'grossly underprepared' for infectious disease outbreaks

Science Daily - Mon, 23/01/2017 - 5:55pm
The world remains 'grossly underprepared' for outbreaks of infectious disease, which are likely to become more frequent in the coming decades, warn a team of international experts.
Categories: Science