Interventions to prevent cognitive decline, dementia

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 9:14pm
Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report.
Categories: Science

BBC Technical Glitch Leaves TV Presenter In Silence

Slashdot - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 8:40pm
Viewers of BBC's News at Ten were entranced last night when a glitch in its system produced over four minutes of surreal beauty. Two readers share a report: Huw Edwards was left sitting in silence for four minutes at the start of BBC News at Ten on Tuesday night after a technical fault delayed the start of the programme and bemused viewers. Viewers on some devices and channels were left watching the presenter sitting in silence as he waited for his cue to start. The BBC News Channel showed Edwards sitting mute for the entirety of the delay, while BBC1 put up a message apologising for the fault and played saxophone music. On BBC iPlayer an announcer apologised for the glitch and breaking news alerts also appeared during the delay. When the programme started at 22:04, Edwards apologised for what he described as a "few technical problems." The presenter said on Wednesday that nobody had told him he was on air until two minutes into the delay. However, Edwards told Radio 4's The Media Show that he "sensed I might be on" so took "the most conservative approach possible" and sat at his desk reading his notes before the bulletin started. BBC hasn't shared more about those "technical glitches." You can watch the clip here.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

With VR180, YouTube Steps Gingerly Toward Virtual Reality

Wired News - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 8:15pm
VR180 isn't VR, but it’s way more accessible.
Categories: Science

Fireball Browser Hijack Impact Revised After Microsoft Analysis

Slashdot - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 8:01pm
Sean Michael Kerner, writing for eWeek: A browser hijacking operation initially reported to have 250 million victims by security firm Check Point isn't quite that large, according to a new analysis by Microsoft. On June 1, security firm Check Point reported that a browser hijacking operation called "Fireball" had already claimed 250 million victims. According to a Microsoft analysis published June 22, Check Point's estimate of the number of victims was "overblown" and the attack is not nearly as widespread as initially reported. The Fireball attack is a browser hijacking that is potentially able to download malware onto victims' systems, as well as manipulate pageviews and redirect search requests. Check Point's initial analysis claimed that Fireball was being bundled as part of free software downloads to unsuspecting users. "Indeed, we have been working with Microsoft on their analysis, feeding them with some additional data," Maya Horowitz, group manager of threat intelligence at Check Point, said in a statement sent to eWEEK. "We tried to reassess the number of infections, and from recent data we know for sure that numbers are at least 40 million, but could be much more."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Why Net Neutrality Matters

Wired News - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 7:52pm
How Trump's decision on net neutrality impacts everyone
Categories: Science

Chrome and Firefox Headless Modes May Spur New Adware & Clickfraud Tactics

Slashdot - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 7:20pm
From a report: During the past month, both Google and Mozilla developers have added support in their respective browsers for "headless mode," a mechanism that allows browsers to run silently in the OS background and with no visible GUI. [...] While this feature sounds very useful for developers and very uninteresting for day-to-day users, it is excellent news for malware authors, and especially for the ones dabbling with adware. In the future, adware or clickfraud bots could boot-up Chrome or Firefox in headless mode (no visible GUI), load pages, and click on ads without the user's knowledge. The adware won't need to include or download any extra tools and could use locally installed software to perform most of its malicious actions. In the past, there have been quite a few adware families that used headless browsers to perform clickfraud. Martijn Grooten, an editor at Virus Bulletin, also pointed Bleeping Computer to a report where miscreants had abused PhantomJS, a headless browser, to post forum spam. The addition of headless mode in Chrome and Firefox will most likely provide adware devs with a new method of performing surreptitious ad clicks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Tesla Is Talking To the Music Labels About Creating Its Own Streaming Service

Slashdot - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:40pm
An anonymous reader shares a Recode report: Music industry sources say the carmaker has had talks with all of the major labels about licensing a proprietary music service that would come bundled with its cars, which already come equipped with a high-tech dashboard and internet connectivity. Label sources aren't clear about the full scope of Tesla's ambitions, but believe it is interested in offering multiple tiers of service, starting with a Pandora-like web radio offering. The bigger question: Why doesn't Tesla simply integrate existing services, like Spotify or Apple Music, into all of its cars from the start -- especially since Tesla already does a deal with Spotify for Teslas sold outside the U.S.? "We believe it's important to have an exceptional in-car experience so our customers can listen to the music they want from whatever source they choose," a Tesla spokesperson said. "Our goal is to simply achieve maximum happiness for our customers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Flexible wearable electronics use body heat for energy

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:31pm
In a proof-of-concept study, engineers have designed a flexible thermoelectric energy harvester that has the potential to rival the effectiveness of existing power wearable electronic devices using body heat as the only source of energy.
Categories: Science

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:30pm
In an arranged marriage of optics and mechanics, physicists have created microscopic structural beams that have a variety of powerful uses when light strikes them.
Categories: Science

How eggs got their shapes

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:30pm
The evolution of the amniotic egg -- complete with membrane and shell -- was key to vertebrates leaving the oceans and colonizing the land and air but how bird eggs evolved into so many different shapes and sizes has long been a mystery. Now, an international team of scientists took a quantitative approach to that question and found that adaptations for flight may have been critical drivers of egg-shape variation in birds.
Categories: Science

Catalyst mimics the z-scheme of photosynthesis

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:30pm
A new study demonstrates a process with great potential for developing technologies for reducing CO2 levels.
Categories: Science

Previously unknown pine marten diversity discovered

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:30pm
The elusive American pine marten, a little-studied member of the weasel family, might be more diverse than originally thought, according to new research.
Categories: Science

How do genes get new jobs? Wasp venom offers new insights

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:30pm
A new study describes how four closely related species of parasitic wasps change their venoms rapidly in order to adapt to new hosts, and proposes that co-option of single copy genes may be a common but relatively understudied mechanism of evolution for new gene functions, particularly under conditions of rapid evolutionary change.
Categories: Science

First Chikungunya-infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes found in Brazil

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:30pm
While more than 13,000 cases of Chikungunya viral disease were reported in Brazil in 2015, scientists had never before detected the virus in a captured mosquito in this country. Now, researchers have identified a mosquito -- caught in the Brazilian city of Aracaju -- that's naturally infected with the East-Central-South-African (ECSA) genotype of Chikungunya.
Categories: Science

Simulated honeybees can use simple brain circuits for complex learning

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:30pm
Honeybees may not need key brain structures known as mushroom bodies in order to learn complex associations between odors and rewards, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Human genes for coronary artery disease make them more prolific parents

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:30pm
Coronary artery disease may have persisted in human populations because the genes that cause this late-striking disease also contribute to having a greater numbers of children.
Categories: Science

New efficient, low-temperature catalyst for hydrogen production

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:29pm
Scientists have developed a new low-temperature catalyst for producing high-purity hydrogen gas while simultaneously using up carbon monoxide (CO). The discovery could improve the performance of fuel cells that run on hydrogen fuel but can be poisoned by CO.
Categories: Science

How bacterial organelles assemble

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:29pm
Scientists are providing the clearest view yet of an intact bacterial microcompartment, revealing at atomic-level resolution the structure and assembly of the organelle's protein shell. This work could benefit research in bioenergy and pathogenesis, and it could lead to new methods of bioengineering bacteria for beneficial purposes.
Categories: Science

Switchable DNA mini-machines store information

Science Daily - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:29pm
Biomedical engineers have built simple machines out of DNA, consisting of arrays whose units switch reversibly between two different shapes. The arrays' inventors say they could be harnessed to make nanotech sensors or amplifiers. Potentially, they could be combined to form logic gates, the parts of a molecular computer.
Categories: Science

Exoskeletons Don't Come One-Size-Fits-All ... Yet

Wired News - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 6:00pm
Researchers are turning to algorithms to make exoskeletons more efficient.
Categories: Science