Saturn-lit Tethys

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 6:47pm
Cassini gazes across the icy rings of Saturn toward the icy moon Tethys, whose night side is illuminated by Saturnshine, or sunlight reflected by the planet.
Categories: Science

Large asteroid to safely pass Earth on Sept. 1

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 6:45pm
Asteroid Florence, a large near-Earth asteroid, will pass safely by Earth on Sept. 1, 2017, at a distance of about 4.4 million miles, (7.0 million kilometers, or about 18 Earth-Moon distances).
Categories: Science

Brown dwarf weather forecasts improved

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 6:42pm
Dim objects called brown dwarfs, less massive than the Sun but more massive than Jupiter, have powerful winds and clouds -- specifically, hot patchy clouds made of iron droplets and silicate dust. Scientists recently realized these giant clouds can move and thicken or thin surprisingly rapidly, in less than an Earth day, but did not understand why.
Categories: Science

Popular Weather App AccuWeather Caught Sending User Location Data, Even When Location Sharing is Off

Slashdot - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 6:40pm
Zack Whittaker, reporting for ZDNet: Popular weather app AccuWeather has been caught sending geolocation data to a third-party data monetization firm, even when the user has switched off location sharing. AccuWeather is one of the most popular weather apps in Apple's app store, with a near perfect four-star rating and millions of downloads to its name. But what the app doesn't say is that it sends sensitive data to a firm designed to monetize user locations without users' explicit permission. Security researcher Will Strafach intercepted the traffic from an iPhone running the latest version of AccuWeather and its servers and found that even when the app didn't have permission to access the device's precise location, the app would send the Wi-Fi router name and its unique MAC address to the servers of data monetization firm Reveal Mobile every few hours. That data can be correlated with public data to reveal an approximate location of a user's device. We independently verified the findings, and were able to geolocate an AccuWeather-running iPhone in our New York office within just a few meters, using nothing more than the Wi-Fi router's MAC address and public data.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Bizarre Sea Creature Could Teach Humans to Do the Locomotion

Wired News - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 6:38pm
The gelatinous salp pulses at its own frequency, but they live together as a long chain—somehow, moving efficiently as a whole.
Categories: Science

Like adults, children show bias in attributing mental states to others

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 6:27pm
Young children are more likely to attribute mental states to characters that belong to the same group as them relative to characters that belong to an outside group, according to new findings. The study shows that 5- and 6-year-olds were more likely to describe interactions between two characters in terms of what they were thinking and feeling when the characters had the same gender or geographic origin as them.
Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: What Are Some Cloud Backup Solutions That You Recommend?

Slashdot - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 6:00pm
New submitter OneHundredAndTen writes: After having used the services of CrashPlan for my backups for a few years now, I have just learned that CrashPlan is exiting the home backup business. Although this won't be happening for another 14 months, they have the chutzpah of recommending a provider (Carbonite) that does not support Linux. Looking in the net, there are not so many alternatives available -- unless you go with somebody that charges you $5/mo and up for a measly 100GB, or (occasionally) 1TB. Fine for a little phone, but not for the several TB worth of video I have shot over the years. Anybody aware of decent cloud backup solutions that support Linux, and that offer a maximum backup capacity that is not ridiculously small? Reader cornjones asks a similar question: My use case: Backups for several computers, both at my house and scattered family machines Encrypted locally by a key I set, only encrypted bits are stored offsite I have a copy of my data onsite. I primarily want to protect against lost drives or fire (or ransomware attack) Ideally, I would be able to point it at a NAS, which I don't have now. The plan I was on was 10 computers, unlimited data, for 4 years @ $429. Lower is better, but I am willing to pay in that range. Across my machines, I probably have about 1TB of bulk storage and 10 or so machines w/, say, 60GB backups each.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: What Are Some Cloud Backup Solutions That Your Recommend?

Slashdot - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 6:00pm
New submitter OneHundredAndTen writes: After having used the services of CrashPlan for my backups for a few years now, I have just learned that CrashPlan is exiting the home backup business. Although this won't be happening for another 14 months, they have the chutzpah of recommending a provider (Carbonite) that does not support Linux. Looking in the net, there are not so many alternatives available -- unless you go with somebody that charges you $5/mo and up for a measly 100GB, or (occasionally) 1TB. Fine for a little phone, but not for the several TB worth of video I have shot over the years. Anybody aware of decent cloud backup solutions that support Linux, and that offer a maximum backup capacity that is not ridiculously small? Reader cornjones asks a similar question: My use case: Backups for several computers, both at my house and scattered family machines Encrypted locally by a key I set, only encrypted bits are stored offsite I have a copy of my data onsite. I primarily want to protect against lost drives or fire (or ransomware attack) Ideally, I would be able to point it at a NAS, which I don't have now. The plan I was on was 10 computers, unlimited data, for 4 years @ $429. Lower is better, but I am willing to pay in that range. Across my machines, I probably have about 1TB of bulk storage and 10 or so machines w/, say, 60GB backups each.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Code42 Says Crashplan Backup Service Will Discontinue All Personal Backup Plans

Slashdot - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 5:20pm
Reader amxcoder writes: Code42, the company behind the popular Crashplan online backup service has announced that will be discontinuing all of its personal and family backup plan offerings to focus on business backup service plans only. In the letter sent to existing personal plan customers, it says that next year will be the cutoff date for personal plans and all existing personal plan holders will have to upgrade their subscriptions to more expensive business plans or leave for another provider after current subscription runs out. Crashplan personal and family services were one of the best (and most affordable) options available for online backup, providing features that other rivals do not, including backup options for cloud, external local drives, and to other friends/family member's drives (trusted offsite). Looking at Carbonite services (who Code42 is recommending existing personal subscribers switch to), does not offer many of the options and features in their backup software, including multiple backup sets, unlimited deleted file retention, the trusted offsite options and any type of 'family subscription' offerings. Here is a statement from the Code42 CEO Joe Payne.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The moving Martian bow shock

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 5:18pm
Physicists throw new light on the interaction between the planet Mars and supersonic particles in the solar wind.
Categories: Science

When given the chance to pay less, patients choose cheaper prescription drugs

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 5:07pm
As prescription drug spending continues to rise in the United States, along with prices for new and well-established drugs, insurers, employers and patients are searching for ways to cut costs. A new study found that a policy called reference pricing is effective at encouraging patients to spend significantly less on prescription drugs by choosing cheaper drugs over name brand options.
Categories: Science

How cytoplasm 'feels' to a cell's components

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 5:07pm
In a study that may guide drug design, researchers find organelles encounter varying levels of resistance, depending on their size and speed, as they move through a cell's cytoplasm.
Categories: Science

Hormonal tug-of-war helps plant roots navigate their journey through the soil

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 5:07pm
A sophisticated mechanism that allows plant roots to quickly respond to changes in soil conditions has been identified by an international research team.
Categories: Science

Gravity, 'mechanical loading' are key to cartilage development

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 5:07pm
Mechanical loading is required for creating cartilage that is then turned to bone; however, little is known about cartilage development in the absence of gravity. Now, bioengineers have determined that microgravity may inhibit cartilage formation. Findings reveal that fracture healing for astronauts in space, as well as patients on bed rest here on Earth, could be compromised in the absence of mechanical loading.
Categories: Science

People Are Using Recycled Laptop Batteries To Power Their Homes

Slashdot - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 4:40pm
New submitter gooddogsgotoheaven writes: DIY Powerwall builders from around the world are harvesting old laptop batteries and turning them into powerful batteries capable of supplying energy to their entire homes. "It's the future. It's clean, simple, efficient and powerful," Jehu Garcia, one of the most popular powerwall builders, told me. He and people like him are deciding for themselves what the future of alternative energy will look like, instead of waiting for technology companies to shape it for them. "The end result is being able to rely on something I not only built myself but understand the ins and outs of to power some or all of my electricity in my home. That is inspiring," Joe Williams, another powerwall builder, told me.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

miR-122 target sites in liver cancer: study links three genes to patient survival

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 4:39pm
A new study shows that a molecule that regulates liver-cell metabolism and suppresses liver-cancer development interacts with thousands of genes in liver cells, and that when levels of the molecule go down, such as during liver-cancer development, the activity of certain cancer-promoting genes goes up. The findings could one day help doctors better predict survival in liver cancer patients and help determine whether the molecule -- called microRNA-122 -- should be developed as an anticancer drug.
Categories: Science

Getting hold of quantum dot biosensors

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 4:38pm
Harnessing the nano-tractor-beam like abilities of optical tweezers, researchers have developed an all-silicon nanoantenna to trap individual quantum dots suspended in a microfluidic chamber.
Categories: Science

Speeding up chemical screening to prioritize toxicity testing

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 4:38pm
Researchers have developed a high-throughput technique that can determine if a chemical has the potential to activate key genes in seconds rather than the typical 24 hours or more. The technique can be used to prioritize chemicals for in-depth testing to determine their toxicity.
Categories: Science

Microreactor made to study formation of methane hydrate

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 4:38pm
Researchers are using a novel means of studying how methane and water form methane hydrate that allows them to examine discrete steps in the process faster and more efficiently.
Categories: Science

ShAPEing the future of magnesium car parts

Science Daily - Tue, 22/08/2017 - 4:38pm
A new process should make it more feasible for the auto industry to incorporate very lightweight magnesium alloys into structural components. The method has the potential to reduce cost by eliminating the need for rare-earth elements, while simultaneously improving the material's structural properties.
Categories: Science