Verizon Revises Its Deal With Yahoo, Reduces Price Of Acquisition By $350M

Slashdot - 42 min 12 sec ago
Ingrid Lunden, writing for TechCrunch: After the disclosure of two massive data breaches last year, today Yahoo and Verizon finally confirmed new terms for the sale of Yahoo to Verizon: Verizon will pay $350 million less than originally planned, working out to a price of $4.48 billion to acquire Yahoo. The two have also agreed to share legal and regulatory liabilities after the massive data breach at Yahoo, which affected some 1.5 billion users across two hacks, one revealed in September 2016, and another in December 2016.

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Categories: Science

If AI Can Fix Peer Review in Science, AI Can Do Anything

Wired News - 1 hour 41 min ago
Reading a scientific paper is not the same as understanding Shakespeare. The post If AI Can Fix Peer Review in Science, AI Can Do Anything appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

When Apps Get Too Human, They Tumble into the Uncanny Valley

Wired News - 2 hours 41 min ago
The more personalized apps get, the more people like them—until they got too personalized. Then they seem freaky. The post When Apps Get Too Human, They Tumble into the Uncanny Valley appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Motorcycle Sleds + Vodka = A Very Russian Bike Rally

Wired News - 2 hours 41 min ago
Once a year, thousands of riders come together to race DIY motorcycles on the ice and get drunk. It's great. The post Motorcycle Sleds + Vodka = A Very Russian Bike Rally appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Virtual Singapore Looks Just Like Singapore IRL—But With More Data

Wired News - 2 hours 42 min ago
The island city-state's simulated version of itself is scheduled to be up and running by the end of the year. The post Virtual Singapore Looks Just Like Singapore IRL—But With More Data appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

How is The New York Times Really Doing?

Slashdot - 2 hours 42 min ago
Wired magazine did a profile on The New York Times in its this month's issue. Talking about the paper's transition from print to more digital-focus than ever, author Gabriel Snyder wrote, "It's to transform the Times' digital subscriptions into the main engine of a billion-dollar business, one that could pay to put reporters on the ground in 174 countries even if (OK, when) the printing presses stop forever." Veteran journalist Om Malik analyzes the numbers: -> The company reported revenue of nearly $1.6 billion in 2016 -- remarkably consistent with prior years. -> Print advertising revenue dipped by $70 million year-over-year to $327 million in 2016. -> Digital advertising revenue, while a meaningful portion of the Times' revenue, did not grow enough to offset vanishing print ad dollars. -> Total digital ad revenue in 2016 was $206 million, up only 6% from the prior year. -> The key revenue driver for the New York Times has been its digital subscription business, which added more than half a million paid subscribers in 2016. Thanks in part to interest around the presidential election, the newspaper added 276,000 new digital subscribers in Q4, the single largest quarterly increase since 2011 (the year the pay model was launched). The Times' digital success is hinged upon two major drivers: affiliate revenues from services like the Wirecutter and digital subscriptions. Advertising might be a good short term bandaid, but the company needs to focus on how to evolve away from it even more aggressively. The Times needs to simplify their sign-up experience and make it easier for people to pay for the subscriptions. As of now, it is like the sound you hear when scratching your nails on a piece of glass.

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Categories: Science

This Is the Air Force Doctor Who Won NASA's Space Poop Challenge

Space.com - 3 hours 21 min ago
Air Force Col. Thatcher Cardon won the agency's "Space Poop Challenge," an effort to design better ways for astronauts to deal with bodily waste than the current super-absorbent diapers.
Categories: Science

Going Bananas: The Real Story of Kepler, Copernicus and the Church

Space.com - 3 hours 42 min ago
The story of Copernicus' clash with the Church over the arrangement of heavenly bodies is often painted in black and white, but at the time, philosophy, science and religion were all mixed up.
Categories: Science

An AI Hedge Fund Created a New Currency to Make Wall Street Work Like Open Source

Wired News - 3 hours 57 min ago
Wall Street is a Darwinian battle for the almighty dollar. But Richard Craib thinks his AI-powered hedge fund will soar if everyone can just get along. The post An AI Hedge Fund Created a New Currency to Make Wall Street Work Like Open Source appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

New Zealand May Be the Tip of a Submerged Continent

Slashdot - 5 hours 42 min ago
An anonymous reader shares a report on The Outline: A group of geologists believe it is time to name a new continent. A paper published in the March/April edition of GSA Today, the journal for the Geological Society of America, lays out the case for Zealandia as the seventh and youngest geological continent. In the past, New Zealand was thought to be part of a collection of "islands, fragments, and slices," the authors wrote, but it's now understood to be part of a solid landmass. New Zealand is essentially the highest mountains of a 1.9 million square mile landmass that is 94 percent underwater, according to the paper. The authors believe it is both large and isolated enough to qualify as a continent. They note that it is elevated relative to the oceanic crust, as befits a continent, and its distinctiveness and thickness are also on par with continents one through six. What does it matter if Zealandia is officially a continent? Reclassifying the area would encourage geologists to include it in studies of comparative continental rifting and continent-ocean boundaries.

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Categories: Science

Why Astronauts Are Banned From Getting Drunk in Space

Slashdot - 8 hours 42 min ago
Bryan Lufkin, writing for BBC: "Alcohol is not permitted onboard the International Space Station for consumption," says Daniel G Huot, spokesperson for Nasa's Johnson Space Center. "Use of alcohol and other volatile compounds are controlled on ISS due to impacts their compounds can have on the station's water recovery system." For this reason, astronauts on the space station are not even provided with products that contain alcohol, like mouthwash, perfume, or aftershave. Spilling beer during some drunken orbital hijinks could also risk damaging equipment. [...] There could be another reason to avoid frothy drinks like beer -- without the assistance of gravity, liquid and gases can tumble around in an astronaut's stomach, causing them to produce rather soggy burps.

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Categories: Science

Apple Files 14-Point Appeal Against European Commission's $14 Billion Tax Edict

Slashdot - 11 hours 12 min ago
An anonymous reader shares an AppleInsider report: Apple has filed its appeal with the European court of appeals, all declaring that the European Commission's decision to levy $14 billion in taxes on Apple on behalf of the EU is erroneous, against the rule of law, and should be stricken. The 14 points of appeal introduced by Apple on Monday challenge the European Commission (EC) on several fronts. Primarily, Apple contests that the Cork, Ireland, headquarters of Apple's European wing was properly set up, in accordance with all regulations and laws. Additionally, other apparent accounting blunders by the EC while making its decision were brought up as well. Apple points out that the taxable income attributed to the Ireland branch was misapplied, giving more weight to the Irish operation than it should, and that back taxes were being applied to worldwide profits.

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Categories: Science

EU Privacy Watchdogs Say Windows 10 Settings Still Raise Concerns

Slashdot - 14 hours 12 min ago
Julia Fioretti, reporting for Reuters: European Union data protection watchdogs said on Monday they were still concerned about the privacy settings of Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system despite the U.S. company announcing changes to the installation process. The watchdogs, a group made up of the EU's 28 authorities responsible for enforcing data protection law, wrote to Microsoft last year expressing concerns about the default installation settings of Windows 10 and users' apparent lack of control over the company's processing of their data. The group -- referred to as the Article 29 Working Party -- asked for more explanation of Microsoft's processing of personal data for various purposes, including advertising. "In light of the above, which are separate to the results of ongoing inquiries at a national level, even considering the proposed changes to Windows 10, the Working Party remains concerned about the level of protection of users' personal data," the group said in a statement which also acknowledged Microsoft's willingness to cooperate.

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Categories: Science

Long-term heavy drinking may age arteries over time

Science Daily - 14 hours 35 min ago
Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, compared to consistently moderate drinkers.
Categories: Science

Selenium deficiency promoted by climate change

Science Daily - 14 hours 35 min ago
As a result of climate change, concentrations of the trace element selenium in soils are likely to decrease. Because the selenium content of crops may also be reduced, the risk of selenium deficiency could be increased in many regions of the world. This was shown by a recent study which used data-mining to model the global distribution of selenium.
Categories: Science

Tech Still Doesn’t Take Discrimination Seriously

Wired News - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 9:25pm
A blog post accusing Uber of systematic failure to address sexual harassment bolsters the idea that the tech biz isn't taking care of its own The post Tech Still Doesn't Take Discrimination Seriously appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Amazon Quietly Lowered Its Free Shipping Minimum to $35

Slashdot - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 9:05pm
Retailers have been busy over the weekend with Presidents Day promotions and sales, but Amazon had a significant surprise discount of its own. From a report: In a blink-and-miss-it move, the online retail giant quietly reduced its free shipping minimum rate to $35. The change was picked up and reported by a number of news outlets over the weekend, and was spotted by Fortune as well during the online checkout process. Amazon confirmed the change on its shipping guidelines and options page, designating which items and regions for delivery are eligible for free shipping. Amazon's free shipping rate, arguably one of the promotions on the site that has been the most popular and vaulted it to its e-commerce throne in years past, has gone up and down over the years. The free shipping minimum has been as low as $25 in the past and was most recently as high as $49.

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Categories: Science

Of Course Facebook Is Putting a Snapchat Clone Inside WhatsApp

Slashdot - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 7:10pm
Karissa Bell, writing for Mashable: Facebook is about to start pushing its next Snapchat clone on a new set of 1 billion+ users. WhatsApp is now starting to roll out its own version of Stories with an update to its Status feature. Launching now in the Netherlands and France, the feature will eventually be live in all the countries where the messaging app is available. [...] The update, which coincides with the chat app's eighth birthday, makes WhatsApp the last of the major Facebook services to get the Snapchat treatment. (The company started with Instagram last year before adding Snapchat-like features to Messenger and the main Facebook app.) Journalist Casey Newton sums up the situation with this sarcastic tweet, "Honestly whatever you think of Evan Spiegel, it's impressive that he's taking Snap public while serving as Facebook's chief product officer."

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Categories: Science

Poaching drives 80 percent decline in elephants in key preserve

Science Daily - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 6:47pm
Forest elephant populations in one of Central Africa's largest sanctuaries have declined between 78% and 81% because of poaching, a new study finds. More than 25,000 elephants in Gabon's Minkébé National Park may have been killed for their ivory between 2004 and 2014. With nearly half of Central Africa's forest elephants thought to live in Gabon, the loss of elephants from the park is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species.
Categories: Science

The Death of the Click

Slashdot - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 6:10pm
Sara Fischer, writing for Axios: For the past 10 years, we've operated on the premise that the most important digital metric is the click that refers a person to a website. That click usually comes from a social distribution channel, like Facebook or Twitter, or a search engine, like Google or Bing. But according to industry experts, the click referral is becoming an idea of the past, soon to be replaced by content exposure. [...] Most publishers have designed their websites to measure user interaction through clicks, not scroll rates or time spent on stories. As the industry moves away from click-through rates (CTR's) as the most meaningful marketing metric, those publishers will have a difficult time justifying the effectiveness of their platforms for marketers.

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Categories: Science