Facebook Puts Users On Suicide Watch

Slashdot - 46 min 10 sec ago
Mark Wilson writes A few months ago Twitter was criticized for teaming up with suicide prevention charity Samaritans to automatically monitor for key words and phrases that could indicate that someone was struggling to cope with life. Despite the privacy concerns that surrounded Samaritans Radar, Facebook has decided that it is going to launch a similar program in a bid to prevent suicides. Working with mental health organizations including Forefront, Now Matters Now, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, and Save.org, Facebook aims to provide greater help and support for anyone considering suicide or self-harm.

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Categories: Science

Robot Roller-Derby Disco Dodgeball Is as Amazing as You’d Expect

Wired News - 1 hour 42 min ago

You'd think that this game would involve skating around a discotheque throwing balls at other robots, and you'd be right.

The post Robot Roller-Derby Disco Dodgeball Is as Amazing as You’d Expect appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Review: Nocs NS2 Air Monitors v2

Wired News - 1 hour 42 min ago

These wireless speakers from Sweden have been improved from a previous version. They now have three streaming methods: AirPlay, Bluetooth, and Spotify Connect.

The post Review: Nocs NS2 Air Monitors v2 appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

London’s Fantastical Competition to Build Another Iconic Bridge

Wired News - 1 hour 43 min ago

People of London, meet the candidates for your newest bridge.

The post London’s Fantastical Competition to Build Another Iconic Bridge appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

How Google’s Silence Helped Net Neutrality Win

Wired News - 1 hour 43 min ago

Google kept a very low profile during the past year's lobbying over net neutrality. That doesn't mean that the company didn't care about the outcome though. In fact, laying low may have been the best thing Google could have done.

The post How Google’s Silence Helped Net Neutrality Win appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

New Fabric Tech Could Be Outerwear’s Biggest Advance in 40 Years

Wired News - 1 hour 48 min ago

A small Colorado-based company, Voormi, is touting a technology that produces a waterproof, breathable textile with only a single layer of material.

The post New Fabric Tech Could Be Outerwear’s Biggest Advance in 40 Years appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Catching a Fireball in the Cold

Space.com - 1 hour 48 min ago
Sometimes, to catch fire you have to sit in the cold.
Categories: Science

Deep astronomy: automated 3D observations of the universe

Kurzweil AI - 1 hour 57 min ago

The MUSE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope reveals previously invisible galaxies (credit: ESO)

The MUSE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile recently gave astronomers the best-ever 3D view of the deep Universe.

After staring at the Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) region for just 27 hours, the new observations and automated analysis revealed details, distances, motions, spectra, compositions, and other properties of 189 galaxies, more than ten times the number of measurements of distance in this tiny piece of the sky — and did it faster.

Some of the new galaxies studied were in existence when the Universe was less than one billion years old, the astronomers said.


ESO | ESOcast 72 – Looking Deeply into the Universe in 3D  

 

Categories: Science

Kleiner Perkins Says It Didn’t Distribute Gender Discrimination Policy Until 2012

Wired News - 2 hours 8 min ago

Prominent venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers had always had an anti-discrimination policy. But before 2012, it was tucked away in a payroll file and never distributed.

The post Kleiner Perkins Says It Didn’t Distribute Gender Discrimination Policy Until 2012 appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Old PC File Transfer Problem

Slashdot - 2 hours 49 min ago
An anonymous reader writes I have an old Compaq Contura Aero laptop from the nineties (20 Mhz, 12 Mb RAM, Windows 3.11, 16-bit, PCMCIA, COM, LPT, floppy) with 160 Mb drive that I would want to copy in full to a newer machine. The floppies are so unreliable — between Aero's PCMCIA floppy drive and USB floppy disk drive — that it is a total nightmare to try and do it; it just doesn't work. If that option is excluded, what else can I do? I have another old laptop with Windows XP (32-bit, PCMCIA, COM, LPT) that could be used; all other machines are too new and lack ports. Will be grateful for any ideas.

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Categories: Science

Xeroxed Gene May Have Paved the Way For Large Human Brain

Slashdot - 3 hours 33 min ago
sciencehabit writes Last week, researchers expanded the size of the mouse brain by giving rodents a piece of human DNA. Now another team has topped that feat, pinpointing a human gene that not only grows the mouse brain but also gives it the distinctive folds found in primate brains. The work suggests that scientists are finally beginning to unravel some of the evolutionary steps that boosted the cognitive powers of our species. "This study represents a major milestone in our understanding of the developmental emergence of human uniqueness," says Victor Borrell Franco, a neurobiologist at the Institute of Neurosciences in Alicante, Spain, who was not involved with the work.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Xeroxed Gene May Have Paved the Way For Large Human Brain

Slashdot - 3 hours 33 min ago
sciencehabit writes Last week, researchers expanded the size of the mouse brain by giving rodents a piece of human DNA. Now another team has topped that feat, pinpointing a human gene that not only grows the mouse brain but also gives it the distinctive folds found in primate brains. The work suggests that scientists are finally beginning to unravel some of the evolutionary steps that boosted the cognitive powers of our species. "This study represents a major milestone in our understanding of the developmental emergence of human uniqueness," says Victor Borrell Franco, a neurobiologist at the Institute of Neurosciences in Alicante, Spain, who was not involved with the work.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Adults wtih disabilities screened for cancer less often

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 11:35pm
Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities are much less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer, research shows. "As individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities live longer, their risk of developing chronic conditions like cancer increases. Suboptimal screening may contribute to a greater cancer burden in this population," says one researcher.
Categories: Science

Top-precision optical atomic clock starts ticking

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 11:35pm
A state-of-the-art optical atomic clock is now 'ticking away.' As the first of its kind in Poland and one of just a handful of clocks of this caliber in the world, the new clock will keep track of the passage of time with extraordinary precision.
Categories: Science

Poor response to cholesterol drugs may indicate blocked arteries

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 11:35pm
Patients whose bad cholesterol levels don't respond to cholesterol-lowering statin drugs may have more artery blockages than those whose cholesterol levels drop with treatment, scientists report.
Categories: Science

Statin use associated with reduced risk of liver cancer among those in the uk

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 11:35pm
In a nested-case control study of individuals living in the UK, a part of the world with a relatively low incidence of liver cancer, statin use is associated with a decreased risk of liver cancer, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Urine test predicts heart failure patients' risk of kidney injury

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 11:34pm
Urinary angiotensinogen levels at the time of hospital admission predicted acute decompensated heart failure patients' risk of developing acute kidney injury with considerable accuracy, scientists report. Patients' urinary angiotensinogen level at the time of admission also helped clinicians predict patients' risk of being rehospitalized or dying within one year.
Categories: Science

OPSEC For Activists, Because Encryption Is No Guarantee

Slashdot - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 11:28pm
Nicola Hahn writes: "In the wake of the Snowden revelations strong encryption has been promoted by organizations like The Intercept and Freedom of the Press Foundation as a solution for safeguarding privacy against the encroachment of Big Brother. Even President Obama acknowledges that "there's no scenario in which we don't want really strong encryption." Yet the public record shows that over the years the NSA has honed its ability to steal encryption keys. Recent reports about the compromise of Gemalto's network and sophisticated firmware manipulation programs by the Office of Tailored Access Operations underscore this reality. The inconvenient truth is that the current cyber self-defense formulas being presented are conspicuously incomplete. Security tools can and will fail. And when they do, what then? It's called Operational Security (OPSEC), a topic that hasn't received much coverage — but it should.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

3D Printers Making Inroads In Kitchens

Slashdot - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 10:45pm
mpicpp sends an article from Fortune about the tiny industry springing up around food-related 3D printing. While such devices are still too expensive and too special-purpose for home kitchens, professionals in restaurants and large cafeterias are figuring out ways they can automate certain time-intensive tasks. For example, pasta: "If the user is making a recipe for ravioli, for instance, the [device] prints the bottom layer of dough, the filling and the top dough layer in subsequent steps. It reduces a lengthy recipe to two minutes construction time and ensures that no one has to clean a countertop caked with leftover dough and flour." The companies developing these 3D printers hope they'll be this generation's version of the microwave, gradually finding a use in almost every kitchen.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Spinning 'Origami' Antenna Successfully Deployed In Space | Video

Space.com - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 10:16pm
NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission team deployed its spacecraft's large antenna on Feb. 24th, 2015. The mission will track and map soil moisture on Earth.
Categories: Science