There Is No "You" In a Parallel Universe

Slashdot - 1 hour 23 min ago
StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "Ever since quantum mechanics first came along, we've recognized how tenuous our perception of reality is, and how — in many ways — what we perceive is just a very small subset of what's going on at the quantum level in our Universe. Then, along came cosmic inflation, teaching us that our observable Universe is just a tiny, tiny fraction of the matter-and-radiation filled space out there, with possibilities including Universes with different fundamental laws and constants, differing quantum outcomes existing in disconnected regions of space, and even the fantastic one of parallel Universes and alternate versions of you and me. But is that last one really admissible? The best modern evidence teaches us that even with all the Universes that inflation creates, it's still a finite number, and an insufficiently large number to contain all the possibilities that a 13.8 billion year old Universe with 10^90 particles admits."

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Categories: Science

George R. R. Martin's "The Winds of Winter" Wiill Not Be Published In 2015

Slashdot - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 11:52pm
Dave Knott (2917251) writes George R.R. Martin's "The WInds Of Winter", the fifth book of his bestselling fantasy saga "A Song Of Ice And Fire" (known to television fans as "Game Of Thrones") will not be published in 2015. Jane Johnson at HarperCollins has confirmed that it is not in this year's schedule. "I have no information on likely delivery," she said. "These are increasingly complex books and require immense amounts of concentration to write. Fans really ought to appreciate that the length of these monsters is equivalent to two or three novels by other writers."Instead, readers will have to comfort themselves with a collection, illustrated by Gary Gianni, of three previously anthologised novellas set in the world of Westeros. "A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms" takes place nearly a century before the bloody events of the A Song of Ice and Fire series. Out in October, it is a compilation of the first three official prequel novellas to the series, The Hedge Knight, The Sworn Sword and The Mystery Knight, never before collected.

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Categories: Science

George R. R. Martin's "The Winds of Winter" Wiill Not Be Published In 2015

Slashdot - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 11:52pm
Dave Knott (2917251) writes George R.R. Martin's "The WInds Of Winter", the fifth book of his bestselling fantasy saga "A Song Of Ice And Fire" (known to television fans as "Game Of Thrones") will not be published in 2015. Jane Johnson at HarperCollins has confirmed that it is not in this year's schedule. "I have no information on likely delivery," she said. "These are increasingly complex books and require immense amounts of concentration to write. Fans really ought to appreciate that the length of these monsters is equivalent to two or three novels by other writers."Instead, readers will have to comfort themselves with a collection, illustrated by Gary Gianni, of three previously anthologised novellas set in the world of Westeros. "A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms" takes place nearly a century before the bloody events of the A Song of Ice and Fire series. Out in October, it is a compilation of the first three official prequel novellas to the series, The Hedge Knight, The Sworn Sword and The Mystery Knight, never before collected.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tech Time Warp of the Week: Return to 1974, When a Computer Ordered a Pizza for the First Time

Wired News - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 11:15pm

Watch John Sherman use a voice synthesizer to place the first computer-assisted pizza delivery order in history.

The post Tech Time Warp of the Week: Return to 1974, When a Computer Ordered a Pizza for the First Time appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Cutting Through Data Science Hype

Slashdot - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 11:05pm
An anonymous reader writes: Data science — or "big data" if you prefer — has evolved into a full-fledged buzzword, thanks to marketing departments around the world. John Foreman writes that part of the marketing blitz has been focused on how fast big data analysis can be. Most companies offering some kind of analytic service try to sell you on how it'll make it easy for you to quickly find and fix the problems with your business. But he points out that good, robust models need a stable set of inputs, and businesses often change far too quickly for any kind of stable prediction. He takes IBM's analytic services as an example, quoting Kevin Hillstrom: "If IBM Watson can find hidden correlations that help your business, then why can't IBM Watson stem a 3 year sales drop at IBM?" Foreman offers some simple advice: "Simple analyses don't require huge models that get blown away when the business changes. ... If your business is currently too chaotic to support a complex model, don't build one."

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Categories: Science

Scientists Float Soap Bubbles As a More Effective Drug Delivery Method

Slashdot - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 10:23pm
Zothecula writes: As if soap bubbles don't spread enough happiness on their own, scientists have discovered a way of coating them in biomolecules with a view to treating viruses, cancer and other diseases. The technology has been developed at the University of Maryland, where researchers devised a method of tricking the body into mistaking the bubbles for harmful cells, triggering an immune response and opening up new possibilities in the delivery of drugs and vaccines.

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Categories: Science

Scientists Float Soap Bubbles As a More Effective Drug Delivery Method

Slashdot - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 10:23pm
Zothecula writes: As if soap bubbles don't spread enough happiness on their own, scientists have discovered a way of coating them in biomolecules with a view to treating viruses, cancer and other diseases. The technology has been developed at the University of Maryland, where researchers devised a method of tricking the body into mistaking the bubbles for harmful cells, triggering an immune response and opening up new possibilities in the delivery of drugs and vaccines.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Scientists Float Soap Bubbles As a More Effective Drug Delivery Method

Slashdot - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 10:23pm
Zothecula writes: As if soap bubbles don't spread enough happiness on their own, scientists have discovered a way of coating them in biomolecules with a view to treating viruses, cancer and other diseases. The technology has been developed at the University of Maryland, where researchers devised a method of tricking the body into mistaking the bubbles for harmful cells, triggering an immune response and opening up new possibilities in the delivery of drugs and vaccines.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How to See Asteroid Juno in the Night Sky with Binoculars

Space.com - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 10:18pm
Juno, the third largest asteroid in the night sky, is currently visible with binoculars, if you know when and where to look. Here's how to use the bright planet Jupiter and two constellations as your guide.
Categories: Science

The Evolution of the Super Bowl’s Zany Logos

Wired News - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 10:15pm

The Super Bowl’s branding lacked consistency, which was likely the result of the NFL commissioning different firms to design it every year.

The post The Evolution of the Super Bowl’s Zany Logos appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Verizon Will Let Customers Sidestep Its Privacy-Killing ‘Perma-Cookie’

Wired News - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 10:14pm

Good news: Verizon Wireless will soon let its users stop the invasive tracking of its ‘perma-cookie.’

The post Verizon Will Let Customers Sidestep Its Privacy-Killing ‘Perma-Cookie’ appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Moon's Phases Are a Lunar Delight for Stargazers

Space.com - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 9:46pm
When is the best time to observe the moon with a telescope? Most astronomy neophytes might say it is when it's at full phase, but that’s probably the worst time to look at it! The best time to see the moon is during its first and last quarter phases.
Categories: Science

Most Americans Support Government Action On Climate Change

Slashdot - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 9:44pm
mdsolar points out this report in the NY Times: An overwhelming majority of the American public, including nearly half of Republicans, support government action to curb global warming, according to a poll conducted by The New York Times, Stanford University and the nonpartisan environmental research group Resources for the Future. In a finding that could have implications for the 2016 presidential campaign, the poll also found that two-thirds of Americans say they are more likely to vote for political candidates who campaign on fighting climate change. They are less likely to vote for candidates who question or deny the science of human-caused global warming. Among Republicans, 48 percent said they are more likely to vote for a candidate who supports fighting climate change, a result that Jon A. Krosnick, a professor of political science at Stanford University and an author of the survey, called "the most powerful finding" in the poll. Many Republican candidates either question the science of climate change or do not publicly address the issue.

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Categories: Science

Facebook Is Making News Feed Better By Asking Real People Direct Questions

Wired News - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 9:23pm

It’s a well-known fact that Facebook’s flagship feature, News Feed, is run by algorithms. But Facebook knows that it can do better than relying solely on these cold computations.

The post Facebook Is Making News Feed Better By Asking Real People Direct Questions appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Evidence for Cosmic Inflation Theory Bites the (Space) Dust

Space.com - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 9:19pm
The signal that scientists with the BICEP2 experiment believed to be a sign of inflation in the early universe was actually light from interstellar dust. Today, scientists with BICEP2 and the Planck satellite announced their conclusion.
Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: How Do I Engage 5th-8th Graders In Computing?

Slashdot - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 9:01pm
An anonymous reader writes: I volunteer at a inner-city community after school program focused K-8th grade. Right now, due to the volunteer demographic, we spend most of our activity time in arts and crafts and homework. The 5th-8th students are getting restless with those activities. I've been asked to spice it up with some electrical wizardry. What I'd like to do is introduce the students to basic jobs skills through computers. My thoughts are that I could conduct some simple hands-on experiments with circuits, and maybe some bread boards. Ultimately, we're going to take apart a computer and put it back together. How successful this project is will dictate whether or not we will go into programming. However, whatever we do, I want the kids to obtain marketable skills. Anyone know of a curriculum I can follow? What experiences have you had with various educational computing projects?

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Categories: Science

All The Films We’ve Caught in the Past Three Days at Sundance

Wired News - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 8:56pm

There'll be time to sleep, but for now, here’s what the middle stretch of the Sundance Film Festival looked like from our vantage point

The post All The Films We’ve Caught in the Past Three Days at Sundance appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Rejoice: Game of Thrones’ Season 5 Trailer Is Finally Here

Wired News - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 8:23pm

It's been a long seven months, but Game of Thrones has finally given us something to hold onto until its fifth season arrives in April.

The post Rejoice: Game of Thrones’ Season 5 Trailer Is Finally Here appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

US Army Releases Code For Internal Forensics Framework

Slashdot - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 8:18pm
An anonymous reader writes: The U.S. Army Research Laboratory in Maryland has released on GitHub a version of a Python-based internal forensics tool which the army itself has been using for five years. Dshell is a Linux-based framework designed to help investigators identify and examine compromised IT environments. One of the intentions of the open-sourcing of the project is to involve community developers in the creation of new modules for the framework. The official release indicates that the version of Dshell released to Github is not necessarily the same one that the Army uses, or at least that the module package might be pared down from the Army-issued software.

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Categories: Science

How Imgur’s New GIF-Maker Stacks Up Against Other Tools Out There

Wired News - Fri, 30/01/2015 - 7:55pm

Imgur's new Video to GIF feature lets you pop in a URL and get a great-looking GIF within seconds. Here's how it compares to similar tools.

The post How Imgur’s New GIF-Maker Stacks Up Against Other Tools Out There appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science